Bruce Hafley (1920-2011)

Bruce Hafley was born in Atlanta in 1920. He studied architecture at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) in Atlanta and served during World War II (1941-45) with the U.S. Army in Africa and Italy. Hafley painted murals for the Red Cross and the Our Lady of Pompeii Orphanage during the war.
In 1958 Hafley began three years of art education at the Royal Academy of the Art in The Hague in the Netherlands. He returned in 1966 to Atlanta, where his wife, Charlotte Hafley, and his daughter, Rose Hafley, both became painters as well. Hafley was known for his portraits, and his portrait of Georgia governor Lester Maddox is on display in the Georgia Capitol rotunda. Hafley died in Atlanta in 2011, at the age of ninety.
Hafley’s watercolor painting Muhammad Ali (1973), mixed media piece When Tom Moved (1967), and acrylic painting Young Girl with Red Hair Ribbons are part of Georgia’s State Art Collection.


Cite This Article
Dobbs, Chris. "Bruce Hafley (1920-2011)." New Georgia Encyclopedia. 19 July 2017. Web. 11 March 2018.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries