Angelo Herndon Case

Angelo Herndon Case

An African American member of the Communist Party, Angelo Herndon won national and international fame as a symbol of political justice after his arrest and subsequent conviction by Fulton County authorities on charges of attempting to incite insurrection in July 1932. Herndon's case traveled a circular route through Georgia's judicial system, appearing twice before the U.S. Supreme Court, which ultimately granted Herndon his freedom in April 1937.
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Communists

Communists

During the late 1920s and 1930s the Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) waged an ambitious campaign to encourage interracial cooperation and recruit new members in the Deep South. Party organizers experienced little formal success in Georgia but nonetheless aroused the ire of state and local officials who were committed to maintaining the state's racial caste system and conservative labor traditions.
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Stetson Kennedy (1916-2011)

Stetson Kennedy (1916-2011)

Folklorist, investigative reporter, author, and labor activist Stetson Kennedy occupies a unique position in Georgia's literary history.
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Emma Cheves Wilkins (1870-1956)

Emma Cheves Wilkins (1870-1956)

A lifelong resident of Savannah, Emma Cheves Wilkins continued the artistic legacy established by her mother and grandmother, and honored the efforts of earlier generations. She developed a census of paintings that is now part of the Frick Art Reference Library in New York City and supported herself by painting portraits of prominent citizens, while simultaneously gaining a reputation for painting lush, impressionistic landscapes and still lifes.
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Freedmen's Bureau

Freedmen's Bureau

In March 1865 the U.S. Congress created the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands to aid African Americans undergoing the transition from slavery to freedom in the aftermath of the Civil War (1861-65).
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Georgia Northwestern Technical College

Georgia Northwestern Technical College

In July 2009 Coosa Valley Technical College and Northwestern Technical College consolidated operations to form a new institution called Georgia Northwestern Technical College. The merger was one of several designed to reduce administrative costs and improve student access to programs within the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG).
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Alexander Hamilton and Son

Alexander Hamilton and Son

Alexander Hamilton and his son Alexander D. Hamilton were African American builders in Atlanta from the 1890s into the 1920s. Their contracting firm, Alexander Hamilton and Son, began in 1890, when the younger Hamilton joined his father's business.
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AT&T (BellSouth Corporation)

AT&T (BellSouth Corporation)

Atlanta-based BellSouth Corporation was created, along with six other Regional Bell Operating Companies, on January 1, 1984, at the divestiture of American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T). Until its remerger with AT&T in December 2006, BellSouth remained the only Regional Bell still using the universally recognized bell symbol and name as part of its corporate identity. The corporation's headquarters were located in Atlanta at Peachtree and Fourteenth streets.
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Butterfly McQueen (1911-1995)

Butterfly McQueen (1911-1995)

Butterfly McQueen is best remembered for her role as a slave named Prissy in the 1939 movie Gone With the Wind.
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Claude Sitton (b. 1925)

Claude Sitton (b. 1925)

Georgia native Claude Sitton distinguished himself during the 1950s and 1960s as one of the foremost reporters covering the civil rights movement for the New York Times. He later served for twenty years as editor of the News and Observer in Raleigh, North Carolina, and in 1983 he received a Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries