Earl T. Shinhoster (1950-2000)

Earl T. Shinhoster (1950-2000)

Throughout more than thirty years of service to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Earl T. Shinhoster distinguished himself as a tireless and versatile foot soldier for civil rights. From his days as a youth council member in the 1960s to his tenure as acting executive director, Shinhoster devoted his life's work to the organization's progress.
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Hattie Saussy (1890-1978)

Hattie Saussy (1890-1978)

For much of the twentieth century, Hattie Saussy was closely associated with the art community of Savannah, whose fledgling art organizations she supported and led. She also studied and traveled extensively outside the region as a young adult, seeking to perfect her impressionistic style of painting.
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Hamilton Jordan (1944-2008)

Hamilton Jordan (1944-2008)

A self-described "political animal," Hamilton Jordan was among the most influential, and controversial, of U.S. president Jimmy Carter's inner circle of political advisors. He suffered multiple bouts with cancer after leaving the White House, and thereafter distinguished himself as an effective advocate for cancer research and treatment.
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Oliver H. Prince (1782-1837)

Oliver H. Prince (1782-1837)

Justly called "a man of many talents" and "something of a renaissance man," Oliver H. Prince served in the Georgia General Assembly and the U.S. Senate, was instrumental in bringing railroads to Georgia, wrote the first great law book by a Georgian, laid out the streets of one of Georgia's major cities, and penned a short story so brilliantly amusing that it was plagiarized by the novelist Thomas Hardy.
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Genetics of Tobacco

Genetics of Tobacco

Tobacco, once a historically significant crop in Georgia, is a relatively minor agricultural commodity in the twenty-first century. Grown in thirty-five Georgia counties in 2007, tobacco generated a farm gate value (the value of the product when it leaves the farm) of around $65 million, ranking it twenty-seventh in the state's top commodities for that year.
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Genetics of Peanuts

Genetics of Peanuts

As the nation's top producer of peanuts, Georgia is closely associated with the crop both economically and historically. In 2007 peanuts generated a farm gate value (the value of a crop when it leaves the farm) of $382 million, ranking it seventh in the state's top commodities for that year. (Poultry was ranked first, with a farm gate value of more than $4.8 billion, and tobacco was twenty-seventh, with $65 million.)
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Genetics of Cotton

Genetics of Cotton

Cotton was ranked second in Georgia's top ten agricultural commodities for 2007, in terms of farm gate value (the value of the product when it leaves the farm). Farmers, primarily in the southern half of the state, raised 1.66 million bales of cotton that generated more than $600 million in farm gate value. (Peanuts were ranked seventh, with approximately $382 million, and tobacco was twenty-seventh, with around $65 million.)
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Genetic Engineering

Genetic Engineering

The genetic engineering of plants and animals influences the daily lives of Georgians, many of whom consume genetically engineered (or transgenic) crops, wear clothes made from cotton engineered to resist pests, and clean up toxic sites with plants engineered to extract, vaporize, or mineralize toxins.
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Phytoremediation

Phytoremediation

Many types of soil and water pollutants that pose a serious risk to human and environmental health can be removed through a process known as phytoremediation.
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Pulitzer Prizes of Georgia

Pulitzer Prizes of Georgia

Numerous Georgia writers have won Pulitzer Prizes for their work in the various categories of letters, drama, and journalism. Other writers have won for their works about Georgia and its residents.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries