First African Baptist Church

First African Baptist Church

The First African Baptist Church in Savannah is one of the oldest African American Baptist churches in North America.
close

Loading

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), whose adherents are known as Latter-day Saints or Mormons, has a long history in Georgia. While the church's growth came primarily from migration into Georgia, much was also the result of strong local leadership. By the end of the twentieth century, Atlanta had become a major center of Mormonism, and as of 2007 more than 60,000 Mormons lived in the state.
close

Loading

African American Archaeology

African American Archaeology

Georgia is one of the birthplaces of the archaeological study of African American sites and artifacts.
close

Loading

Jackson Lee Nesbitt (1913-2008)

Jackson Lee Nesbitt (1913-2008)

Jackson Lee Nesbitt, a noted printmaker and painter of the American Scene, dedicated his artistic career to the portrayal of ordinary people going about the business of their lives. A native of Oklahoma, Nesbitt created scenes from the Midwest during the 1930s and 1940s, but in the 1950s, when interest in his work diminished, he moved to Atlanta and established a second career in advertising. Thirty years later, Nesbitt sold his business and resumed his artistic career from Atlanta.
close

Loading

Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History

Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History

Anchoring the west end of the Sweet Auburn historic district, the Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History opened May 1994 in Atlanta.
close

Loading

Singer-Moye Mounds

Singer-Moye Mounds

Dating to the Mississippian Period (A.D. 800-1600), the Singer-Moye site, located in south central Stewart County, is home to eight earthen mounds ranging from three to forty-six feet in height.
close

Loading

John Morgan (1842-1894)

John Morgan (1842-1894)

In 1876 Mormon missionary John Morgan traveled to Georgia from Salt Lake City, Utah, in an effort to win converts for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). His most important accomplishment was the establishment of a Colorado colony for emigrating southern Latter-day Saints, an achievement rewarded when he was named president of the Southern States Mission.
close

Loading

Joseph Standing (1854-1879)

Joseph Standing (1854-1879)

Mormon missionary Joseph Standing, an an elder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), was murdered in Whitfield County in 1879 at the hands of a mob comprising twelve local residents. He was laid to rest in Salt Lake City, Utah, where the Latter-day Saints erected a monument bearing the words: "There is no law in Georgia for the Mormons."
close

Loading

Cherokee Indians

Cherokee Indians

The Cherokees, one of the most populous Indian societies in the Southeast during the eighteenth century, played a key role in Georgia's early history. They were close allies of the British for much of the eighteenth century. During the Seven Years' War (1756-63) and American Revolution (1775-83), a breakdown in relations with the British and then the Americans led to repeated invasions of the Cherokee homeland.
close

Loading

Jasper Johns (b. 1930)

Jasper Johns (b. 1930)

For more than fifty years, Augusta-born artist Jasper Johns has set a standard for American art. Over the course of his long career, Johns has produced a complex and challenging body of work, receiving numerous awards and accolades, and exhibiting widely to great acclaim.
close

Loading

Pages

Subscribe to New Georgia Encyclopedia RSS
Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries