Georgia's City Governments

Georgia's City Governments

There are more than 520 cities and towns in Georgia. Each possesses a charter of municipal incorporation approved by the Georgia General Assembly. Because municipalities are creatures of the state legislature, their boundaries, their structure, and even their existence can be altered or abolished by the state.
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English Trade in Deerskins and Indian Slaves

English Trade in Deerskins and Indian Slaves

When the English came to America, the Native Americans of Georgia encountered one of the most profound forces for change: the world economy. European merchants ushered in this new economic system with a commercial trade in dressed animal skins but even more so with a commercial trade in enslaved Indians. The slave trade began in northeastern America and spread quickly.
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Nacoochee Mound

Nacoochee Mound

The Nacoochee Mound site is situated along the banks of the upper Chattahoochee River in the mountains of northeast Georgia.
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Swift Creek Culture

Swift Creek Culture

Swift Creek archaeological culture refers to Woodland prehistoric cultural groups in Georgia who manufactured a distinctive pottery type. This pottery, generally termed Swift Creek Complicated Stamped, is noted for its distinctive decoration.
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Cane Island Site

Cane Island Site

The Cane Island archaeological site is one of Georgia's earliest Native American farming villages. It now lies beneath Lake Oconee in Greene County, between Greensboro and Eatonton.
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Stallings Island Site

Stallings Island Site

Stallings Island, a National Historic Landmark site, was a major settlement of Late Archaic Native Americans from 4,500 to 3,500 years ago.
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Archaic Period: Overview

Archaic Period: Overview

The Archaic Period of Georgia prehistory lasted from about 10,000 to 3,000 years ago. Archaeologists have divided this very long period into three main subperiods: Early, Middle, and Late. Each is distinguished by important changes in cultural traditions, which generally follow a trend toward increasing social complexity.
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Creek Indians

Creek Indians

The history of early Georgia is largely the history of the Creek Indians. For most of Georgia's colonial period, Creeks outnumbered both European colonists and enslaved Africans and occupied more land than these newcomers. Not until the 1760s did the Creeks become a minority population in Georgia. They ceded the balance of their lands to the new state in the 1800s.
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Macon Trading Post

Macon Trading Post

In 1936 archaeologist Arthur R. Kelly located the remains of a fortified trading establishment in the midst of a Creek Indian archaeological site on the Ocmulgee National Monument.
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Etowah Mounds

Etowah Mounds

This nationally famous, prehistoric archaeological site contains one of the largest Indian mounds in North America. A number of rare artifacts were found here. The site of the ancient fifty-four-acre Indian town is located on the Etowah River, some three miles south of Cartersville in Bartow County.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries