Creek Indians

Creek Indians

The history of early Georgia is largely the history of the Creek Indians. For most of Georgia's colonial period, Creeks outnumbered both European colonists and enslaved Africans and occupied more land than these newcomers. Not until the 1760s did the Creeks become a minority population in Georgia. They ceded the balance of their lands to the new state in the 1800s.
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Macon Trading Post

Macon Trading Post

In 1936 archaeologist Arthur R. Kelly located the remains of a fortified trading establishment in the midst of a Creek Indian archaeological site on the Ocmulgee National Monument.
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Etowah Mounds

Etowah Mounds

This nationally famous, prehistoric archaeological site contains one of the largest Indian mounds in North America. A number of rare artifacts were found here. The site of the ancient fifty-four-acre Indian town is located on the Etowah River, some three miles south of Cartersville in Bartow County.
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Indian Warfare

Indian Warfare

Warfare affected the lives of Georgia's Indians in many significant ways. All Indian men considered themselves warriors and trained to use the bow and war club. Valor in battle, demonstrated through the killing of enemies, was a primary means of social advancement as recently as the nineteenth century. Warfare also became a prominent theme in the Indians' belief systems and greatly affected the development and organization of their societies.
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Westo Indians

Westo Indians

The Westo Indians, who lived along the Savannah River near Augusta from about 1660 to 1680, were one of the most important Native American groups in the southeastern United States. They obtained firearms from the English in Virginia before most other Indians in the Southeast did, which gave them a tremendous military advantage over bow-and-arrow Indians. The Westos used this advantage to enslave natives throughout Georgia, Florida, and the Carolinas.
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Kolomoki Mounds

Kolomoki Mounds

The Kolomoki Mounds site is one of the largest prehistoric mound complexes in Georgia. At the time of its highest development, from around A.D. 350 to 600, Kolomoki was perhaps one of the most populous settlements north of Mexico. The site is located in Early County in southwest Georgia.
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Late Prehistoric/Early Historic Chiefdoms (ca. A.D. 1300-1850)

Late Prehistoric/Early Historic Chiefdoms (ca. A.D. 1300-1850)

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The Nature of Chiefdoms

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Spanish Missions

Spanish Missions

The Spanish chapter of Georgia's earliest colonial history is dominated by the lengthy mission era, extending from 1568 through 1684. Catholic missions were the primary means by which Georgia's indigenous Native American chiefdoms were assimilated into the Spanish colonial system along the northern frontier of greater Spanish Florida.
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Marion Montgomery (1925-2011)

Marion Montgomery (1925-2011)

Poet, novelist, intellectual, and literary critic, Marion Montgomery taught composition, literature, and creative writing at the University of Georgia for thirty-three years. He also wrote hundreds of poems, dozens of short stories, three novels, one novella, and more than twenty books of literary and cultural criticism. Montgomery received numerous awards for his fiction and verse in the 1960s and early 1970s. In 2001 he received the Stanley W.
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Frank Manley (1930-2009)

Frank Manley (1930-2009)

The author of poems, plays, novels, and short stories, Frank Manley wrote mostly about southern characters in marginal encounters that force them to engage spiritual questions or dilemmas of faith and reason.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries