Indian Warfare

Indian Warfare

Warfare affected the lives of Georgia's Indians in many significant ways. All Indian men considered themselves warriors and trained to use the bow and war club. Valor in battle, demonstrated through the killing of enemies, was a primary means of social advancement as recently as the nineteenth century. Warfare also became a prominent theme in the Indians' belief systems and greatly affected the development and organization of their societies.
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Westo Indians

Westo Indians

The Westo Indians, who lived along the Savannah River near Augusta from about 1660 to 1680, were one of the most important Native American groups in the southeastern United States. They obtained firearms from the English in Virginia before most other Indians in the Southeast did, which gave them a tremendous military advantage over bow-and-arrow Indians. The Westos used this advantage to enslave natives throughout Georgia, Florida, and the Carolinas.
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Kolomoki Mounds

Kolomoki Mounds

The Kolomoki Mounds site is one of the largest prehistoric mound complexes in Georgia. At the time of its highest development, from around A.D. 350 to 600, Kolomoki was perhaps one of the most populous settlements north of Mexico. The site is located in Early County in southwest Georgia.
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Late Prehistoric/Early Historic Chiefdoms (ca. A.D. 1300-1850)

Late Prehistoric/Early Historic Chiefdoms (ca. A.D. 1300-1850)

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The Nature of Chiefdoms

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Spanish Missions

Spanish Missions

The Spanish chapter of Georgia's earliest colonial history is dominated by the lengthy mission era, extending from 1568 through 1684. Catholic missions were the primary means by which Georgia's indigenous Native American chiefdoms were assimilated into the Spanish colonial system along the northern frontier of greater Spanish Florida.
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Marion Montgomery (1925-2011)

Marion Montgomery (1925-2011)

Poet, novelist, intellectual, and literary critic, Marion Montgomery taught composition, literature, and creative writing at the University of Georgia for thirty-three years. He also wrote hundreds of poems, dozens of short stories, three novels, one novella, and more than twenty books of literary and cultural criticism. Montgomery received numerous awards for his fiction and verse in the 1960s and early 1970s. In 2001 he received the Stanley W.
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Frank Manley (1930-2009)

Frank Manley (1930-2009)

The author of poems, plays, novels, and short stories, Frank Manley wrote mostly about southern characters in marginal encounters that force them to engage spiritual questions or dilemmas of faith and reason.
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Francis Palmer Smith (1886-1971)

Francis Palmer Smith (1886-1971)

Francis Palmer Smith of the architectural firm Pringle and Smith was an academic architect in the prevailing tradition of early-twentieth-century eclecticism. His breadth of interests and range of practice were as extensive as those of any architect of his period in Georgia. He began his career as an architectural educator and ended his long practice as an architect with a reputation as the most accomplished of his generation in Atlanta.
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Community Preservation

Community Preservation

The story of historic preservation in Georgia, as in the nation, is one of the rebirth of neighborhoods and downtowns. In the almost fifty years since the Historic Savannah Foundation began reclaiming that city's historic downtown neighborhoods, historic preservation has increasingly been used in Georgia as the basis for community development.
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Leila Ross Wilburn (1885-1967)

Leila Ross Wilburn (1885-1967)

The practice of Atlanta architect Leila Ross Wilburn emerged from and reflected the values of the Craftsman movement. Craftsman architecture promoted craftsmanship, solid construction, family life, and egalitarian values embodied in small houses for middle-class Americans. Encouraging homeownership for large numbers of clients, Wilburn was the only woman known to have published plan books for contractors and house builders.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries