Burge and Stevens

Burge and Stevens

Burge and Stevens (later Stevens and Wilkinson) was the initial partnership of an architectural firm, still active in the twenty-first century, which has enjoyed one of the longest continuous practices in Atlanta's history. Formed in 1919 by Flippen David Burge (1895-1946) and Preston Standish Stevens Sr. (1896-1989), Burge and Stevens began designing small suburban residences, often in simplified Tudor, colonial revival, or neoclassical styles.
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Ivey and Crook

Ivey and Crook

The architectural firm Ivey and Crook (1923-67) excelled in traditional architecture during a competitive period of eclecticism. The firm built residences, churches, and schools in Atlanta and LaGrange, and occasionally other locations in the Southeast. Its most popular and recognizable residential feature was the four-columned portico adorning single-story homes, a southern colonial image that looked to Thomas Jefferson's neoclassicism for inspiration.
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Edmund G. Lind (1829-1909)

Edmund G. Lind (1829-1909)

Edmund George Lind was one of the few nationally prominent architects to practice in Georgia during the early Victorian era. Born and trained in England, he was a leading figure in the increasingly important American Institute of Architects (AIA). Through his writing, design work, and support of professional organization, he played a significant role during his stay in the state from 1882 to 1893.
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W. T. Downing (1865-1918)

W. T. Downing (1865-1918)

By the end of the nineteenth century, W. T. Downing, at thirty-five, already had developed a reputation as a designer of stylish homes for an elite clientele in Atlanta. His houses were innovative in their combined stylistic references and sophisticated in their up-to-date Late Victorian taste. He was responsible for several of Atlanta's oldest extant churches.
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William H. Parkins (1836-1894)

William H. Parkins (1836-1894)

William H. Parkins was the most significant architect practicing in Georgia in the immediate decades following the Civil War (1861-65). A New Yorker who had lived in South Carolina in the 1850s, he returned to the postbellum South and settled in Atlanta. There Parkins started the state's most successful architectural business, which lasted until his retirement in the late 1880s.
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G. L. Norrman (1848-1909)

G. L. Norrman (1848-1909)

Swedish-born Gottfried Leonard Norrman came to Atlanta in 1881 after an extensive architectural education in Scandinavia and Germany. For the next twenty-eight years he was a major designer, a successful businessman with work in five states, and an active promoter of professionalization.
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Neel Reid (1885-1926)

Neel Reid (1885-1926)

For several generations Neel Reid was the best-known residential architect in Atlanta. His houses enjoyed a pedigree, level of prestige, and quality that made them the most sought after in the city. Owning a Neel Reid house, with its refinement of style, was thought to be a mark of taste and social acceptability.
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John Wellborn Root (1850-1891)

John Wellborn Root (1850-1891)

The architect John Wellborn Root, a Georgia native, became one of the key figures in the nationally significant Chicago school of skyscraper design. He designed one of the most significant buildings in Atlanta, the Equitable Building.
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Carson McCullers (1917-1967)

Carson McCullers (1917-1967)

With a collection of work including five novels, two plays, twenty short stories, more than two dozen nonfiction pieces, a book of children's verse, a small number of poems, and an unfinished autobiography, Carson McCullers is considered to be among the most significant American writers of the twentieth century.
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Janice Daugharty (b. 1944)

Janice Daugharty (b. 1944)

Since 1994 Janice Daugharty has published a volume of short fiction, six novels, and numerous short stories and essays. She has built a national reputation as a chronicler of life and people in south Georgia and is one of the state's most popular and prolific contemporary authors.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries