<i>Heaven Bound</i>

Heaven Bound

Heaven Bound, an African American folk drama that portrays the struggles and pitfalls of a group of pilgrims striving to reach the gates of heaven, was first performed on February 17, 1930, at the Big Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Atlanta. It was hailed soon after as "the first great American folk drama" by the Theatre Guild and has been performed annually ever since.
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Georgia Mountain Fair

Georgia Mountain Fair

The Georgia Mountain Fair is held every summer in Hiawassee, the seat of Towns County. Attendance has grown from 2,000 in its 1950 inaugural event to 100,000 in recent years.
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Crackers

Crackers

The epithet cracker has been applied in a derogatory way, like redneck, to rural, non-elite white southerners, more specifically to those of south Georgia and north Florida. Folk etymology claims the term originated either from their cracking, or pounding, of corn (rather than taking it to mill), or from their use of whips to drive cattle.
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Okefenokee Swamp Folklore

Okefenokee Swamp Folklore

The Okefenokee Swamp and environs are a distinctive folk region, shaped by Celtic ethnicity, geographic isolation, and Primitive Baptist religion. The swamp alone covers more than 700 square miles of southeast Georgia and northwest Florida. Indian peoples occupied the "land of the trembling earth" through the early 1800s, when most were driven out or forcibly removed by Europeans.
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Wiregrass Folklore

Wiregrass Folklore

Wiregrass country, named for its native tall grass (Aristida stricta), is a historic area of the South shared by south central Georgia, southeastern Alabama, and the panhandle of Florida.
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Rafting Folklore

Rafting Folklore

Timber raftsmen played a major role in the economy of Georgia during the great building boom that followed the Civil War (1861-65). Their colorful story has eluded historians, but it survives in the folklore and oral traditions of south Georgia.
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<i>Swamp Gravy</i>

Swamp Gravy

Swamp Gravy, Georgia's 
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Charlie Smith (b. 1947)

Charlie Smith (b. 1947)

A Georgia-born poet, novelist, and short-story writer, Charlie Smith is a frequent contributor to national literary journals and periodicals, including Poetry, the Paris Review, and the New Yorker. Equally adept at poetry and fiction, Smith is a master of notable lyrical description, sensory detail, and candor. In several novels, novellas, and collections of poetry, Smith balances the loneliness and bleakness of his characters' lives with the beauty and transcendence of the natural world.
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Sidney Lanier (1842-1881)

Sidney Lanier (1842-1881)

Sidney Lanier contributed significantly to the arts in nineteenth-century America. His accomplishments as a poet, novelist, composer, and critic reflect his eclectic interests, and his melodic celebrations of Georgia's terrain are among his most widely read poems. His works reflect a love of the land, as well as his concern over declining values and commercial culture in the Reconstruction South. Some of his writings extol the rhythmic natural world and the religious vision it evokes.
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Anne Rivers Siddons (b. 1936)

Anne Rivers Siddons (b. 1936)

Though all of her eighteen books have been set in Georgia or concern southerners living elsewhere, Anne Rivers Siddons is best known for books about Atlanta and its environs. Two novels, Homeplace (1987) and Nora, Nora (2000), take place in a fictionalized version of Fairburn, her hometown, in Fulton County.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries