Roy Blount Jr. (b. 1941)

Roy Blount Jr. (b. 1941)

From the "ring-tailed roarers" of Augustus Baldwin Longstreet's antebellum satire to the "rednecks" of Jeff Foxworthy's New South schtick, Georgia has long been a fertile ground for humorists. A leading modern practitioner in this tradition is Roy Blount Jr.—humorist, journalist, sportswriter, poet, novelist, performer, editor, lyricist, lecturer, screenwriter, dramatist, and philologist.
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William Tappan Thompson (1812-1882)

William Tappan Thompson (1812-1882)

During the middle of the nineteenth century, William Tappan Thompson gained national popularity as a writer of humorous stories. He was best known for creating the fictional character Major Joseph Jones, a down-to-earth Georgia planter who wrote dialect letters about his courtship, rural life, and travels. These letters, originally appearing in periodicals that Thompson edited, were published in Major Jones's Courtship and Major Jones's Sketches of Travel.
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Julien Green (1900-1998)

Julien Green (1900-1998)

Julien Green, novelist, autobiographer, dramatist, critic, and first non-French national elected to the Academie Francaise (1971), was greatly attached to his American nationality and to his roots in Georgia. A large section of his writing constitutes a quest for identity by an American living abroad in France.
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Stephen Corey (b. 1948)

Stephen Corey (b. 1948)

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Poet, essayist, and editor Stephen Corey has lived and worked in Athens since 1983. As assistant, associate, acting, and finally editor of the Georgia Review, he has helped shape the literary landscape in this country for the past two decades. He has also gained national recognition for his own poems and essays.

Early Life and Career

Corey
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Terry Kay (b. 1938)

Terry Kay (b. 1938)

A prolific and award-winning author, Terry Kay has written fiction and screenplays, as well as a children's book and a collection of nonfiction prose. His novel To Dance with the White Dog became a best-seller that was dramatized by the Hallmark Hall of Fame in a televised production.
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Philip Lee Williams (b. 1950)

Philip Lee Williams (b. 1950)

Philip Lee Williams is an award-winning and prolific writer who has lived his entire life in Georgia. Williams has authored books in the genres of fiction, memoir, essay, poetry, and children's literature. He also founded and edited the poetry journal Ataraxia.
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Joel Chandler Harris (1845-1908)

Joel Chandler Harris (1845-1908)

One of the South's most treasured authors, Joel Chandler Harris gained national prominence for his numerous volumes of Uncle Remus folktales. Harris's long-standing legacy as a "progressive conservative" New South journalist, folklorist, fiction writer, and children's author continues to influence our society today.
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Evelyn Hanna (1900-1982)

Evelyn Hanna (1900-1982)

Evelyn Hanna was one of a number of southern women whose writing became known as one of Georgia's new "money crops." Like her contemporary Margaret Mitchell, Hanna used the Civil War (1861-65) as a backdrop for her romantic fiction.
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<i>Tobacco Road</i> and <i>God's Little Acre</i>

Tobacco Road and God's Little Acre

Although Erskine Caldwell wrote more than sixty books, twenty-five novels among them, he is best known for two works of long fiction, Tobacco Road (1932) and God's Little Acre (1933). Tobacco Road was named one of the Modern Library's 100 best novels of the twentieth century, and God's Little Acre remains Caldwell's single most popular work, having sold more than 10 million copies.
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Knights of Labor

Knights of Labor

The largest labor organization in late-nineteenth-century America, the Order of the Knights of Labor claimed more than 700,000 members at its apex in 1886. The Knights' membership peaked simultaneously in Georgia at about 9,000. Although the Knights faded from Georgia by the early 1890s, the Order led some significant labor conflicts and local political challenges and recruited workers regardless of skill, race, or gender.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries