Charlie Smith (b. 1947)

Charlie Smith (b. 1947)

A Georgia-born poet, novelist, and short-story writer, Charlie Smith is a frequent contributor to national literary journals and periodicals, including Poetry, the Paris Review, and the New Yorker. Equally adept at poetry and fiction, Smith is a master of notable lyrical description, sensory detail, and candor. In several novels, novellas, and collections of poetry, Smith balances the loneliness and bleakness of his characters' lives with the beauty and transcendence of the natural world.
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Sidney Lanier (1842-1881)

Sidney Lanier (1842-1881)

Sidney Lanier contributed significantly to the arts in nineteenth-century America. His accomplishments as a poet, novelist, composer, and critic reflect his eclectic interests, and his melodic celebrations of Georgia's terrain are among his most widely read poems. His works reflect a love of the land, as well as his concern over declining values and commercial culture in the Reconstruction South. Some of his writings extol the rhythmic natural world and the religious vision it evokes.
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Anne Rivers Siddons (b. 1936)

Anne Rivers Siddons (b. 1936)

Though all of her eighteen books have been set in Georgia or concern southerners living elsewhere, Anne Rivers Siddons is best known for books about Atlanta and its environs. Two novels, Homeplace (1987) and Nora, Nora (2000), take place in a fictionalized version of Fairburn, her hometown, in Fulton County.
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Roy Blount Jr. (b. 1941)

Roy Blount Jr. (b. 1941)

From the "ring-tailed roarers" of Augustus Baldwin Longstreet's antebellum satire to the "rednecks" of Jeff Foxworthy's New South schtick, Georgia has long been a fertile ground for humorists. A leading modern practitioner in this tradition is Roy Blount Jr.—humorist, journalist, sportswriter, poet, novelist, performer, editor, lyricist, lecturer, screenwriter, dramatist, and philologist.
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William Tappan Thompson (1812-1882)

William Tappan Thompson (1812-1882)

During the middle of the nineteenth century, William Tappan Thompson gained national popularity as a writer of humorous stories. He was best known for creating the fictional character Major Joseph Jones, a down-to-earth Georgia planter who wrote dialect letters about his courtship, rural life, and travels. These letters, originally appearing in periodicals that Thompson edited, were published in Major Jones's Courtship and Major Jones's Sketches of Travel.
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Julien Green (1900-1998)

Julien Green (1900-1998)

Julien Green, novelist, autobiographer, dramatist, critic, and first non-French national elected to the Academie Francaise (1971), was greatly attached to his American nationality and to his roots in Georgia. A large section of his writing constitutes a quest for identity by an American living abroad in France.
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Stephen Corey (b. 1948)

Stephen Corey (b. 1948)

Poet, essayist, and editor Stephen Corey has lived and worked in Athens since 1983. As assistant, associate, acting, and finally editor of the Georgia Review, he has helped shape the literary landscape in this country for the past two decades. He has also gained national recognition for his own poems and essays.
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Terry Kay (b. 1938)

Terry Kay (b. 1938)

A prolific and award-winning author, Terry Kay has written fiction and screenplays, as well as a children's book and a collection of nonfiction prose. His novel To Dance with the White Dog became a best-seller that was dramatized by the Hallmark Hall of Fame in a televised production.
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Philip Lee Williams (b. 1950)

Philip Lee Williams (b. 1950)

Philip Lee Williams is an award-winning and prolific writer who has lived his entire life in Georgia. Williams has authored books in the genres of fiction, memoir, essay, poetry, and children's literature. He also founded and edited the poetry journal Ataraxia.
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Joel Chandler Harris (1845-1908)

Joel Chandler Harris (1845-1908)

One of the South's most treasured authors, Joel Chandler Harris gained national prominence for his numerous volumes of Uncle Remus folktales. Harris's long-standing legacy as a "progressive conservative" New South journalist, folklorist, fiction writer, and children's author continues to influence our society today.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries