Evelyn Hanna (1900-1982)

Evelyn Hanna (1900-1982)

Evelyn Hanna was one of a number of southern women whose writing became known as one of Georgia's new "money crops." Like her contemporary Margaret Mitchell, Hanna used the Civil War (1861-65) as a backdrop for her romantic fiction.
close

Loading

<i>Tobacco Road</i> and <i>God's Little Acre</i>

Tobacco Road and God's Little Acre

Although Erskine Caldwell wrote more than sixty books, twenty-five novels among them, he is best known for two works of long fiction, Tobacco Road (1932) and God's Little Acre (1933). Tobacco Road was named one of the Modern Library's 100 best novels of the twentieth century, and God's Little Acre remains Caldwell's single most popular work, having sold more than 10 million copies.
close

Loading

Knights of Labor

Knights of Labor

The largest labor organization in late-nineteenth-century America, the Order of the Knights of Labor claimed more than 700,000 members at its apex in 1886. The Knights' membership peaked simultaneously in Georgia at about 9,000. Although the Knights faded from Georgia by the early 1890s, the Order led some significant labor conflicts and local political challenges and recruited workers regardless of skill, race, or gender.
close

Loading

Georgia Botanical Society

Georgia Botanical Society

In 1926 the Georgia Botanical Society was founded in Atlanta by Eugene Scofield Heath with the following goals: to promote the understanding and appreciation of plants and their relationship to the environment; to undertake or support the setting apart of appropriate areas in Georgia for the preservation of native and cultivated flora; to encourage the protection of rare and endangered plant species and significant botanical habitats; and
close

Loading

Carl Vinson (1883-1981)

Carl Vinson (1883-1981)

Carl Vinson, recognized as "the father of the two-ocean navy," served twenty-five consecutive terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. When he retired in January 1965, he had served in the U.S. Congress longer than anyone in history. He also set the record for service as chair of a standing committee. He chaired the House Naval Affairs Committee for sixteen years (1931-47) and its successor, the House Armed Services Committee, for fourteen years (1949-53 and 1955-65).
close

Loading

Thomas Holley Chivers (1809-1858)

Thomas Holley Chivers (1809-1858)

Thomas Holley Chivers, poet and physician, published eleven volumes of poetry, plays, and pamphlets. He also contributed to leading antebellum literary periodicals and newspapers, especially the Georgia Citizen, and wrote a biography of Edgar Allan Poe, his friend and kindred spirit. Nevertheless, the eccentric Georgia writer never achieved the critical acclaim that he craved.
close

Loading

Vereen Bell (1911-1944)

Vereen Bell (1911-1944)

Vereen Bell wrote fiction and magazine articles set in the southern outdoors, and he achieved popular success with Swamp Water, a coming-of-age novel set in the Okefenokee Swamp. A World War II (1941-45) naval officer, Bell was killed during the Battle for Leyte Gulf.
close

Loading

Berry Fleming (1899-1989)

Berry Fleming (1899-1989)

Publishers Weekly magazine once called Berry Fleming "the quintessential Southern writer; funny, wise and like the best of those from the South, an incredibly good storyteller." His long career began in 1927 with the publication of
close

Loading

Bailey White (b. 1950)

Bailey White (b. 1950)

Bailey White first achieved popularity reading her local color essays on National Public Radio. Her distinctive, gravelly voice and her gift for portraying eccentric people and unusual situations with a gently self-deprecating wit won her a national following. White has published two essay collections (Mama Makes Up Her Mind and Sleeping at the Starlite Hotel) and one novel (Quite a Year for Plums), and her work has appeared as well in numerous periodicals.
close

Loading

John Rollin Ridge (1827-1867)

John Rollin Ridge (1827-1867)

John Rollin Ridge (also known as Cheesquatalawny and Yellow Bird), considered the first Native American novelist, was born near New Echota (near the present city of Rome) on March 19, 1827. His grandfather Major Ridge, his father, John Ridge, and his uncles Elias Boudinot (Buck Watie) and Stand Watie led the Cherokee "Treaty Party," which signed a removal agreement at New Echota in 1835.
close

Loading

Pages

Subscribe to New Georgia Encyclopedia RSS
Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries