<i>Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil</i>

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

The impact of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil on Savannah has been greater than that of any other book in the city's history.
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Pam Durban (b. 1947)

Pam Durban (b. 1947)

A southern writer who has received much recognition for her gripping, insightful fiction, Pam Durban was professor of creative writing at Georgia State University from 1986 until 2001, when she moved to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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Frances Newman (1883-1928)

Frances Newman (1883-1928)

Frances Newman was a novelist, translator, critic, book reviewer, and librarian. Writing within a feminist tradition of southern fiction that has been nearly forgotten, Newman differed from her feminist contemporaries Ellen Glasgow, Mary Johnston, and Isa Glenn in her playful humor and stylistic experimentation.
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Pat Conroy (1945-2016)

Pat Conroy (1945-2016)

Contemporary southern author Pat Conroy wrote a number of highly popular books, including The Water Is Wide, The Great Santini, The Lords of Discipline, The Prince of Tides, and Beach Music. Conroy also achieved considerable success as a screenwriter.
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Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964)

Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964)

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Flannery O'Connor is considered one of America's greatest fiction writers and one of the strongest apologists for Roman Catholicism in the twentieth century. Born of the marriage of two of Georgia's oldest Catholic families, O'Connor was a devout believer whose small but impressive body of fiction presents the soul's struggle with what she called the "stinking mad shadow of Jesus."

Early Life and Education

Mary Flannery O'Connor 
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Erskine Caldwell (1903-1987)

Erskine Caldwell (1903-1987)

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Over the course of a long career, Erskine Caldwell wrote twelve books of nonfiction, twenty-five novels, and nearly 150 short stories. He was intent on depicting life among the lowly in Georgia and the rest of the South, and his concern for the less fortunate—poor whites and blacks—shines in his great novels and short stories of the 1930s. This concern also permeates the strongest writing of his later years, his nonfiction works of the 1960s.

Early Life and Education

Born
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James Kilgo (1941-2002)

James Kilgo (1941-2002)

James Kilgo, an essayist and novelist, wrote with a reverence for the natural world and a deep and abiding sense of family and history. His essays on hunting, nature, family, and personal introspection won him national attention, and his novel, Daughter of My People, earned him the Townsend Prize for Fiction.
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Anthony Grooms (b. 1955)

Anthony Grooms (b. 1955)

Anthony "Tony" M. Grooms is a writer and arts administrator who is well known in the Atlanta area for his work in organizing arts events and for his support and encouragement of other writers.
Born January 15, 1955, Grooms was raised and educated in rural Louisa County, Virginia, 120 miles south of Washington, D.C. The eldest of six children, he grew up among an extended African American family that also claimed Native American and European heritage.
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Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin (1897-1988)

Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin (1897-1988)

Sociologist, activist, teacher, and writer, Katharine Du Pre Lumpkin spent a lifetime studying and combating economic and racial oppression. She is best known for her autobiography, The Making of a Southerner (1947).
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Corra Harris (1869-1935)

Corra Harris (1869-1935)

Novelist Corra White Harris was one of the most celebrated women from Georgia for nearly three decades in the early twentieth century. She is best known for her first novel, A Circuit Rider's Wife (1910), though she gained a national audience a decade before its publication.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries