Judson Mitcham (b. 1948)

Judson Mitcham (b. 1948)

An award-winning poet and novelist, Judson Mitcham was named poet laureate of Georgia in 2012. His writings, which examine basic human themes within the specific landscape of Georgia, are both poignant and powerful.
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Larry Rubin (b. 1930)

Larry Rubin (b. 1930)

Larry Jerome Rubin has published hundreds of poems in literary magazines and four volumes of selected verse since he came to Atlanta in 1950 and began his long academic career as an English professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1956.
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Kathryn Stripling Byer (1944-2017)

Kathryn Stripling Byer (1944-2017)

Poet and essayist Kathryn Stripling Byer was a native of Georgia but set most of her poems in the mountains of North Carolina. Creating an identity that was both distinct and in line with the concerns of southern culture, Byer reclaimed in her poetry the traditions, customs, and voices of past Appalachian women. In doing so, she defined herself as an artist and, at the same time, addressed the concerns of women in today's South.
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<i>Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil</i>

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

The impact of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil on Savannah has been greater than that of any other book in the city's history.
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Pam Durban (b. 1947)

Pam Durban (b. 1947)

A southern writer who has received much recognition for her gripping, insightful fiction, Pam Durban was professor of creative writing at Georgia State University from 1986 until 2001, when she moved to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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Frances Newman (1883-1928)

Frances Newman (1883-1928)

Frances Newman was a novelist, translator, critic, book reviewer, and librarian. Writing within a feminist tradition of southern fiction that has been nearly forgotten, Newman differed from her feminist contemporaries Ellen Glasgow, Mary Johnston, and Isa Glenn in her playful humor and stylistic experimentation.
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Pat Conroy (1945-2016)

Pat Conroy (1945-2016)

Contemporary southern author Pat Conroy wrote a number of highly popular books, including The Water Is Wide, The Great Santini, The Lords of Discipline, The Prince of Tides, and Beach Music. Conroy also achieved considerable success as a screenwriter.
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Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964)

Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964)

Flannery O'Connor is considered one of America's greatest fiction writers and one of the strongest apologists for Roman Catholicism in the twentieth century. Born of the marriage of two of Georgia's oldest Catholic families, O'Connor was a devout believer whose small but impressive body of fiction presents the soul's struggle with what she called the "stinking mad shadow of Jesus."
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Erskine Caldwell (1903-1987)

Erskine Caldwell (1903-1987)

Over the course of a long career, Erskine Caldwell wrote twelve books of nonfiction, twenty-five novels, and nearly 150 short stories. He was intent on depicting life among the lowly in Georgia and the rest of the South, and his concern for the less fortunate—poor whites and blacks—shines in his great novels and short stories of the 1930s. This concern also permeates the strongest writing of his later years, his nonfiction works of the 1960s.
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James Kilgo (1941-2002)

James Kilgo (1941-2002)

James Kilgo, an essayist and novelist, wrote with a reverence for the natural world and a deep and abiding sense of family and history. His essays on hunting, nature, family, and personal introspection won him national attention, and his novel, Daughter of My People, earned him the Townsend Prize for Fiction.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries