Bobby Jones (1902-1971)

Bobby Jones (1902-1971)

The greatest amateur golfer ever, Bobby Jones dominated his sport in the 1920s. In the eight seasons from 1923 to 1930, Jones won thirteen major championships, including five U.S. Amateurs, four U.S. Opens, three British Opens, and one British Amateur. On September 27, 1930, he became the only man to win all four major titles in one season, completing the "Grand Slam" of golf. Then, while still in his athletic prime at the age of twenty-eight, he retired from competition to devote more time to his family and his law practice.
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Early Victorian Architecture: Overview

Early Victorian Architecture: Overview

In the forty-five years from 1850 to 1895, architecture in Georgia advanced from simple Greek revival forms to the massive steel-frame skyscraper. In between, architects and builders used a myriad of styles as the state endured a disastrous war, Reconstruction, and economic depressions.
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Sapelo Island

Sapelo Island

Sapelo Island, situated about sixty miles south of Savannah, lies in the center of coastal Georgia's well-defined chain of barrier islands. The 16,500-acre island is Georgia's fourth largest and, excepting the 434-acre African American community of Hog Hammock, is entirely state owned and managed.
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<i>Swamp Water</i>

Swamp Water

The first novel by Vereen Bell, Swamp Water was published initially in serial form in the Saturday Evening Post in November and December 1940, and then in book form by Little, Brown in February 1941. It was an immediate sensation in the South and across the nation. Bell, a native of Cairo, Georgia, edited American Boy-Youth's Companion during the late 1930s, and returned home in 1940 to write fiction full-time.
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Lillian Smith (1897-1966)

Lillian Smith (1897-1966)

Lillian Smith was one of the first prominent white southerners to denounce racial segregation openly and to work actively against the entrenched and often brutally enforced world of Jim Crow. From as early as the 1930s, she argued that Jim Crow was evil ("Segregation is spiritual lynching," she said) and that it leads to social and moral retardation.
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Conrad Aiken (1889-1973)

Conrad Aiken (1889-1973)

Over a period of nearly fifty years Conrad Aiken published poems, essays, short stories, novels, and literary criticism. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1930 for Selected Poems (1929) and a National Book Award for Collected Poems (1953). His literary autobiography, Ushant, reveals the international nature of his complex life and literary career.
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Augusta Jane Evans (Wilson) (1835-1909)

Augusta Jane Evans (Wilson) (1835-1909)

Augusta Jane Evans wrote nine novels about southern women that were among the most popular fiction in nineteenth-century America. Her most successful novel, St. Elmo (1866), sold a million copies within four months of its appearance and remained in print well into the twentieth century. The sexual tensions between the book's cynical Byronic hero, St.
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James Dickey (1923-1997)

James Dickey (1923-1997)

James Dickey ranks, along with Conrad Aiken, as one of the two most important Georgia poets in the twentieth century. His strongly visceral, sensory-laden descriptions and a poetic style that deviated from the intellectualism of such high modernist poets as T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, and Gertrude Stein made him a distinctive figure in contemporary American writing.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries