<i>Swamp Water</i>

Swamp Water

The first novel by Vereen Bell, Swamp Water was published initially in serial form in the Saturday Evening Post in November and December 1940, and then in book form by Little, Brown in February 1941. It was an immediate sensation in the South and across the nation. Bell, a native of Cairo, Georgia, edited American Boy-Youth's Companion during the late 1930s, and returned home in 1940 to write fiction full-time.
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Lillian Smith (1897-1966)

Lillian Smith (1897-1966)

Lillian Smith was one of the first prominent white southerners to denounce racial segregation openly and to work actively against the entrenched and often brutally enforced world of Jim Crow. From as early as the 1930s, she argued that Jim Crow was evil ("Segregation is spiritual lynching," she said) and that it leads to social and moral retardation.
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Conrad Aiken (1889-1973)

Conrad Aiken (1889-1973)

Over a period of nearly fifty years Conrad Aiken published poems, essays, short stories, novels, and literary criticism. He won a Pulitzer Prize in 1930 for Selected Poems (1929) and a National Book Award for Collected Poems (1953). His literary autobiography, Ushant, reveals the international nature of his complex life and literary career.
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Augusta Jane Evans (Wilson) (1835-1909)

Augusta Jane Evans (Wilson) (1835-1909)

Augusta Jane Evans wrote nine novels about southern women that were among the most popular fiction in nineteenth-century America. Her most successful novel, St. Elmo (1866), sold a million copies within four months of its appearance and remained in print well into the twentieth century. The sexual tensions between the book's cynical Byronic hero, St.
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James Dickey (1923-1997)

James Dickey (1923-1997)

James Dickey ranks, along with Conrad Aiken, as one of the two most important Georgia poets in the twentieth century. His strongly visceral, sensory-laden descriptions and a poetic style that deviated from the intellectualism of such high modernist poets as T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, and Gertrude Stein made him a distinctive figure in contemporary American writing.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries