Jean Childs Young (1933-1994)

Jean Childs Young (1933-1994)

Jean Childs Young was the first lady of Atlanta during the mayoral terms of her husband, Andrew Young, in the 1980s and was known nationally and internationally as an educator and advocate for children's rights.
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J. Richardson Jones (ca. 1901-1948)

J. Richardson Jones (ca. 1901-1948)

J. Richardson Jones was an actor, a cinematographer, and a journalist for the Atlanta Daily World, the largest circulating black southern newspaper during the first half of the twentieth century.
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<i>Southern Poetry Review</i>

Southern Poetry Review

Southern Poetry Review is one of the oldest and most prestigious poetry journals in the Southeast. It is currently housed at Armstrong State University in Savannah.
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Court of Appeals of Georgia

Court of Appeals of Georgia

The Court of Appeals of Georgia, established in 1906, is a court of statewide jurisdiction whose decisions are binding upon all Georgia trial courts in the absence of a conflicting decision by the Supreme Court of Georgia.
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Welfare and Poverty during the Civil War

Welfare and Poverty during the Civil War

Georgia's civilian population felt the economic effects of the Civil War (1861-65) nearly as soon as soldiers left home to fight. As the war progressed, those on the home front faced growing shortages of food, salt, cloth, and cash. Governor Joseph E.
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Nancy Harts Militia

Nancy Harts Militia

The Nancy Harts militia, formed in LaGrange during the first weeks of the Civil War (1861-65), was a female military unit organized by the wives of Confederate soldiers to protect the home front.
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Confederate Veteran Organizations

Confederate Veteran Organizations

Confederate veteran organizations were formed to alleviate and address many of the challenges facing former soldiers and their communities in the aftermath of the Civil War (1861-65).
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Civil War Reenacting

Civil War Reenacting

Reenactments of the Civil War (1861-65) are the most popular and widely known form of Civil War public commemoration in Georgia. Reenacting is a loosely organized hobby in which men and women dress as Union or Confederate soldiers or civilians to stage re-creations of Civil War battles, encampments, or marches. The hobby also offers fellowship, fun, and education to its participants and to its audiences.
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Desertion during the Civil War

Desertion during the Civil War

Desertion plagued Georgia regiments during the Civil War (1861-65) and, in addition to other factors, debilitated the Confederate war effort. Deserters were not merely cowards or ne'er-do-wells; some were seasoned veterans from battle-hardened regiments.
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Confederate Hospitals

Confederate Hospitals

During the Civil War (1861-65), Confederate military medical authorities established general hospitals behind the lines in at least thirty-nine cities and towns in Georgia, though many of them remained at a particular location for only a short time.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries