Battle of Pickett's Mill

Battle of Pickett's Mill

The Battle of Pickett's Mill was among the more decisive encounters of the Atlanta campaign during the Civil War (1861-65), and today, the Pickett's Mill Battlefield Historic Site in Paulding County is one of the most thoroughly preserved and interpreted Civil War battlefields in the nation.
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Civil War Cemeteries

Civil War Cemeteries

Both during and after the Civil War (1861-65), Georgians faced the task of burying the Confederate and Union soldiers who died within the state's bounds. Many of the fallen were later reburied either in existing cemeteries or in new ones specifically dedicated to Civil War soldiers. Nearly every sizable cemetery in Georgia contains individual graves of Confederate soldiers or veterans who died after the war was over, and several have entire sections devoted to Civil War dead.
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Georgia in 1860

Georgia in 1860

Georgia, uniquely situated among southern states on the eve of the Civil War (1861-65), played a vital part in the formation of the Confederacy. A geographic lynchpin that linked Atlantic seaboard and Deep South states, the "Empire State" was the second-largest state in area east of the Mississippi River (Virginia was larger until West Virginia broke away in 1861), and the second-largest Deep South state (only Texas was larger).
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Civil War Centennial

Civil War Centennial

Between 1961 and 1965 the state of Georgia took part in the commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the Civil War (1861-65). Following the lead of the federal government, which had established the Civil War Centennial Commission in 1957, Georgia created in 1959 a state commission, which subsequently encouraged local communities to carry out commemorative events in their areas.
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Civil War Journals, Diaries, and Memoirs

Civil War Journals, Diaries, and Memoirs

In Patriotic Gore (1962), his classic study of Civil War (1861-65) literature, the literary critic Edmund Wilson asks, "Has there ever been another historical crisis of the magnitude of 1861-1865 in which so many people were so articulate?" Historian Louis Masur later made the same point, stating that "the Civil War was a written war," one in which hundreds of participants and observers "struggled to capture the texture of the extraordinary and t
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Guerrilla Warfare during the Civil War

Guerrilla Warfare during the Civil War

Guerrilla warfare in Georgia during the Civil War (1861-65) often took place in sparsely populated regions where Unionist or anti-Confederate sentiment created divisions among the civilian population. In many cases Unionist and Confederate neighbors clashed for control of their communities. In other instances guerrillas operated against major field armies.
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Civil War Dissent

Civil War Dissent

The Civil War (1861-65) home front in Georgia, far from reflecting unity in a common cause, was rife with conflict and dissent. Though the state was largely spared the impact of invading armies until late in the war, social and economic divisions set Georgians against one another in ever worsening internal conflicts that undermined support for the Confederacy well before the war's end.
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Georgia Health Sciences University

Georgia Health Sciences University

Note from the Editors: In January 2013 Georgia Health Sciences University (GHSU) merged with Augusta State University to form Georgia Regents University (later Augusta University). This article chronicles the history of GHSU from its founding until the time of the merger.
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"Marching through Georgia"

"Marching through Georgia"

"Marching through Georgia" is one of the best-known songs of the Civil War (1861-65). Composed by Henry Clay Work and published soon after the war ended in 1865, it commemorates Union general William T. Sherman's march from Atlanta to Savannah in the fall of 1864.
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United Daughters of the Confederacy

United Daughters of the Confederacy

The Georgia division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) was formed on November 8, 1895.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries