Confederate Monuments

Confederate Monuments

Confederate memorials honor those who fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War (1861-65), and are located across the state, in both large cities and small communities.
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Union Blockade and Coastal Occupation in the Civil War

Union Blockade and Coastal Occupation in the Civil War

The battle between ship and shore on the coast of Confederate Georgia was a pivotal part of the Union strategy to subdue the state during the Civil War (1861-65). U.S.
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USS <i>Water Witch</i>

USS Water Witch

The USS Water Witch, part of the Union fleet assigned to carry out a naval blockade of the Georgia coast during the Civil War (1861-65), was captured by Confederate naval troops in 1864. This rare Confederate naval victory ultimately had minimal significance, however.
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Civil War in Georgia: Overview

Civil War in Georgia: Overview

The South, like the rest of the country, was forever altered by the dramatic events of the Civil War (1861-65).
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Athos Menaboni (1895–1990)

Athos Menaboni (1895–1990)

Italian-born artist Athos Menaboni arrived in Georgia in the late 1920s and remained active until his death at the age of ninety-four. His early career focused primarily on corporate projects, including the creation of murals for clients in Atlanta, before he turned to painting birds from life, usually in pairs and in their natural habitats. Today Menaboni is best known for his numerous paintings of more than 150 different species of birds native to the Atlanta region.
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W. T. Wofford (1824-1884)

W. T. Wofford (1824-1884)

W. T. Wofford was a cavalry captain in the Mexican War (1846-48), a Georgia politician, and a Confederate colonel (later brigadier general) during the Civil War (1861-65). Though originally against secession, Wofford supported his home state when Georgia seceded from the Union, and he participated in several major battles during the course of the Civil War.
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Georgia and the Sectional Crisis

Georgia and the Sectional Crisis

The sectional crisis of the 1850s, in which Georgia played a pivotal role, led to the outbreak of the Civil War (1861-65). Southern politicians struggled during the crisis to prevent northern abolitionists from weakening constitutional protections for slavery
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Civil War Archaeology

Civil War Archaeology

Archaeology offers a unique perspective on the Civil War (1861-65), allowing archaeologists and historians to look at this defining event from a material perspective.
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Civil War Industry and Manufacturing

Civil War Industry and Manufacturing

The manufacturing might of the North during the Civil War (1861-65) often overshadowed that of the South, but the success of the Confederate war effort depended as much on the iron of its industry as the blood of its fighting men.
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<i>Wanderer</i>

Wanderer

The Wanderer was the last ship to bring enslaved people from Africa to Georgia and one of the last ships to smuggle bondsmen to American soil. On November 28, 1858, the Wanderer arrived at Jekyll Island, where its crew smuggled ashore 409 slaves acquired in West Africa.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries