Unionists

Unionists

Historians of the Civil War (1861-65) have only recently begun serious study of Unionists, an often overlooked group of white southerners who played a substantial part in sowing discontent and undermining the Confederate war effort. Unionists found themselves living in a new nation, the Confederacy, to which they chose not to give their allegiance. While their numbers in Georgia (or in any other southern state) are uncertain, much about Unionist presence and activity in the state has come to light in recent years.
close

Loading

Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas (1834-1907)

Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas (1834-1907)

Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas, the daughter and wife of Augusta planters, is best known for the extensive journal she kept of her life before, during, and after the Civil War (1861-65).
close

Loading

Battle of Resaca

Battle of Resaca

Fought on May 14-15, 1864, the Battle of Resaca was the first major engagement of the Atlanta campaign in the Civil War (1861-1865).
close

Loading

<i>Macaria</i>

Macaria

Macaria; or Altars of Sacrifice, the third novel by Columbus native Augusta Jane Evans, was published in April 1864, during the Civil War (1861-65). The book served as propaganda for the Confederate cause and helped to redefine the role of Confederate women during the war.
close

Loading

Annie L. McPheeters (1908-1994)

Annie L. McPheeters (1908-1994)

Annie L. McPheeters was one of the first African American professional librarians in the Atlanta Public Library and an influential proponent of African American culture and history. A librarian, educator, and civil rights activist, she provided library services and resources to segregated communities through educational programs for children and adults. Her efforts were recognized in 1993, when the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System named the Washington Park/Annie L.
close

Loading

Thomas "Blind Tom" Wiggins (1849-1908)

Thomas "Blind Tom" Wiggins (1849-1908)

One of the most famous American entertainers of the nineteenth century, Thomas "Blind Tom" Wiggins was an African American musician and composer. Blind from birth and born into slavery, Wiggins became well known for his piano virtuosity. Though undiagnosed at the time, it is likely that he was autistic as well.
close

Loading

Hugh Peterson Sr. (1898-1961)

Hugh Peterson Sr. (1898-1961)

Hugh Peterson Sr., a native of Ailey, in Montgomery County, served in the Georgia General Assembly from 1923 to 1933. Along with Georgia governor Richard B.
close

Loading

Tyler Perry (b. 1969)

Tyler Perry (b. 1969)

Tyler Perry, an Atlanta-based writer, producer, and performer, is one of the most commercially successful African American filmmakers in history. Tyler Perry Studios, which opened in Atlanta in 2008, is the first major film studio in the nation to be owned by an African American. Perry is best known for his signature character, Madea, whom he has portrayed in both stage plays and films.
close

Loading

<i>On the Plantation</i>

On the Plantation

On the Plantation: A Story of a Georgia Boy's Adventures during the War (1892), written by famed New South journalist and folklorist Joel Chandler Harris, is a fictionalized memoir of Harris's adolescence during the Civil War (1861-65).
close

Loading

Civil War on the Chattahoochee River

Civil War on the Chattahoochee River

As part of the Union naval strategy to blockade Southern ports during the Civil War (1861-65), the U.S. Navy closed access to the Chattahoochee River system at Apalachicola, Florida, on June 11, 1861, and maintained its coastal presence there for the remainder of the war.
close

Loading

Pages

Subscribe to New Georgia Encyclopedia RSS
Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries