CSS <i>Savannah</i>

CSS Savannah

Over the course of the Civil War (1861-65), three different fighting ships of the Confederate navy were given the name Savannah. All three ships saw only limited action along the Georgia coast during the war.
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Deborah Norville (b. 1958)

Deborah Norville (b. 1958)

Georgia native Deborah Norville, a journalist and author, is best known for her brief stint as the co-anchor of NBC's Today show and as the longtime host of the nationally syndicated television newsmagazine Inside Edition.
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Mirabeau B. Lamar (1798-1859)

Mirabeau B. Lamar (1798-1859)

Georgia native Mirabeau B. Lamar, a state senator, journalist, poet, and soldier, served as the second president of the Republic of Texas, from 1838 to 1841.
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Jim Fowler (b. 1930)

Jim Fowler (b. 1930)

Jim Fowler, a native of Dougherty County, enjoyed a long career as co-host and then host of the popular television series Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom, which aired from the mid-1960s through the mid-1980s. Fowler's mission as a naturalist includes educating the public about wildlife species throughout the world and preserving the environments in which the animals live.
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Cecil Alexander (1918-2013)

Cecil Alexander (1918-2013)

Cecil Alexander was a prominent Atlanta architect and civic leader. As a partner in the architectural firm FABRAP, he was responsible for some of the city's most notable public buildings.
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John Twiggs (1750-1816)

John Twiggs (1750-1816)

A prominent militia leader during the Revolutionary War (1775-83), John Twiggs led Georgia forces against both the British and the Cherokee Indians in the backcountry. After the war he remained active on a variety of political and military fronts, statewide and in and around Augusta, including involvement in the Yazoo land fraud.
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Lugenia Burns Hope (1871-1947)

Lugenia Burns Hope (1871-1947)

Lugenia Burns Hope was an early-twentieth-century social activist, reformer, and community organizer. Spending most of her career in Atlanta, she worked for the improvement of black communities through traditional social work, community health campaigns, and political pressure for better education and infrastructure.
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Herman J. Russell (1930-2014)

Herman J. Russell (1930-2014)

Herman J. Russell, the founder and former chief executive officer of H. J. Russell and Company, was a nationally recognized entrepreneur and philanthropist, as well as a highly influential leader in Atlanta. Over the course of fifty years, Russell amassed one of the nation's most profitable minority-owned business empires, turning a small plastering company into a construction and real estate conglomerate.
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<i>Atlanta Daily World</i>

Atlanta Daily World

The Atlanta Daily World, the oldest African American newspaper in Atlanta, has provided coverage of and commentary on events and issues pertinent to the African American community since 1928. The Atlanta Daily World remained in the hands of one family, the Scotts, until its purchase in 2012 by Real Times Media.
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Woolfolk Murder Case

Woolfolk Murder Case

The most infamous crime in nineteenth-century Georgia occurred in Bibb County, about twelve miles west of Macon, in the early morning hours of August 6, 1887, when Tom Woolfolk (pronounced WUHL-fork) murdered nine members of his family with an ax.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries