Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA)

Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA)

The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), passed on October 17, 1986, amends the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, or Superfund), which the U.S. Congress passed in 1980 to help solve the problems of hazardous-waste sites.
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Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle D

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle D

The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is a federal law that describes how to handle solid and hazardous waste in the United States. Subtitle D of RCRA specifically concerns the management of nonhazardous solid waste. Waste disposal is an important issue for citizens in all states, including Georgia, because poor waste management can have negative effects on both the environment and human health.
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Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle C

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle C

Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) is a comprehensive plan developed to manage hazardous waste from its point of origin through disposal. Georgia is home to numerous producers of hazardous and biohazardous materials, including power-generating facilities, manufacturing businesses, hospitals, and some government agencies.
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Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)

The federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) was established in 1976 as an amendment to the 1965 Solid Waste Disposal Act, with the dual purpose of protecting human and environmental health and reducing waste. In Georgia, RCRA is enforced by the Hazardous Waste Management Branch of the Environmental Protection Division (EPD), which is a part of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.
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Industrial Toxins

Industrial Toxins

Industries in Georgia, including paper manufacturing, agriculture, and electrical power generation, produce and manage thousands of tons of industrial toxins each year. A toxin, by definition, is a substance that is highly poisonous to living creatures. Toxins generally originate from such living sources as plants, animals, and bacteria. In today's highly industrialized world, however, humans create toxins as by-products of the processes used to produce goods, food, and energy.
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Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund)

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (Superfund)

The federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, or Superfund) allows the federal government to clean up toxic-waste sites and pursue those responsible for dumping toxic substances. Toxic-waste sites subject to Superfund are placed on the National Priority List (NPL), which in 2009 included fifteen sites in Georgia, as well as one proposed site.
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Brownfields

Brownfields

Located on former industrial sites, brownfields are abandoned properties that are contaminated, or potentially contaminated, with hazardous pollutants. An estimated 450,000 brownfields exist in the United States. Land developers often view such properties as being too difficult to clean up, causing them to sit as unproductive and polluted plots of land. However, qualified entities can apply to the U.S.
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Redemption

Redemption

In the context of southern politics, the term Redemption refers to the overthrow or defeat of Radical Republicans (white and black) by white Democrats, marking the end of the Reconstruction era in the South.
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David Emanuel (ca. 1744-1808)

David Emanuel (ca. 1744-1808)

David Emanuel was a leader in the Revolutionary War (1775-83), a state legislator, and an acting governor. Because so few records remain of his life, he is one of Georgia's least-known governors. Emanuel County, in the wiregrass region, is named for him.
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Writ of Habeas Corpus

Writ of Habeas Corpus

Georgia has played an influential role in the development of the "Freedom Writ" of habeas corpus, and its original constitution was the first in history to make access to the writ a constitutional right.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries