Latino Immigration

Latino Immigration

Beginning in the late 1960s, Georgia, like many of its Deep South neighbors, witnessed an unprecedented wave of immigration from abroad. In 1970 Georgia's foreign-born population was approximately 33,000, or 0.7 percent of the total state population; in 2013 the foreign-born population totaled more than 970,000, or 9.7 percent of the population.
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Georgia Project

Georgia Project

The Georgia Project was established in 1997 in Dalton to address the dual issues of the city's growing Hispanic student population with little or nonexistent English proficiency and a lack of resources for educating those children. The pioneering program, which centers on a teacher exchange with Mexico, is a nonprofit organization recognized nationally as a leader in multicultural education.
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Georgia History: Overview

Georgia History: Overview

In many ways Georgia's history is integrally linked to that of the rest of the South and the rest of the nation. But as the largest state east of the Mississippi, the youngest and southernmost of the thirteen colonies, and by 1860 the most populous southern state, Georgia is in certain respects historically distinctive.
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Dalton

Dalton

Dalton, the carpet capital of the world, is located eighty miles north of Atlanta and thirty miles south of Chattanooga, Tennessee, in the Valley and Ridge province of northwest Georgia.
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Leah Ward Sears (b. 1955)

Leah Ward Sears (b. 1955)

Leah Ward Sears served as the chief justice of the Supreme Court of Georgia from 2005 until 2009. During those same years she was also chair of the Judicial Council of Georgia. In 1992, when she was appointed by Georgia governor Zell Miller, Sears became the first woman and the youngest justice to sit on the Supreme Court of Georgia.
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John Henry "Doc" Holliday (1851-1887)

John Henry "Doc" Holliday (1851-1887)

Georgia native Doc Holliday, a noted gambler and gunman of the Old West, or Wild West, became famous for his role at the O.K. Corral gunfight in Tombstone, Arizona, in 1881, and for his lifelong friendship with Wyatt Earp. Holliday, an icon of American folk history, has been immortalized in numerous film and television productions.
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Cotton Gins

Cotton Gins

The modern cotton gin, first patented by Massachusetts native Eli Whitney while in Georgia in 1793, is a simple machine that separates cotton fibers from the seeds. The gin (short for engine) consists of wire teeth mounted on a boxed rotating cylinder that, when cranked, pulls cotton fiber through small grates to separate the seeds, while a rotating brush removes lint from the spikes to avoid jams.
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River Basins

River Basins

Georgia's natural resources include fourteen river basins, which support a rich diversity of native fish and mussel species. A river basin consists of the entire geographic area (hillside, valley, plain) from which water flows into the primary river, which is made up of an intricate network of smaller rivers and streams. Rain falling within a river basin, or watershed, runs downhill until it reaches a stream. Small streams join other streams and flow into a river, and eventually that river flows into the sea.
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Civilian Conservation Corps

Civilian Conservation Corps

Among the numerous New Deal programs of Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) is remembered as one of the most popular and effective.
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John Portman (1924-2017)

John Portman (1924-2017)

John Portman, a prominent twentieth-century architect, established his early reputation in Atlanta by combining the role of architect with that of developer. Because he often personally contributed to the financing of his projects, Portman enjoyed a degree of independence in fulfilling his architectural visions.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries