Goats

Goats

Goats
Rural residents in Georgia have raised goats for many years. Goats provide food products and cash income and in some cases serve as pets. Goats are generally of three types: those that produce large quantities of milk, those that are raised for meat, and those kept for fiber (mohair and cashmere). In Georgia very few goats (Angoras) are kept for fiber production. Pygmy goats often serve as pets and show animals.
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Sheep

Sheep

Sheep have been raised in Georgia and the Southeast for centuries. Writings from the 1700s and 1800s suggest that lamb and wool production were important in those societies. The production and marketing of lamb and wool have been declining both nationally and in Georgia in recent decades. From a national high of nearly 40 million sheep in the 1940s, there are now about 7.5 million in the United States and fewer than 10,000 in Georgia.
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Elbert County

Elbert County

Lake Russell
In the northeast Georgia Piedmont, between the Savannah and Broad rivers,
lies Elbert County. The area was originally settled before the American Revolution (1775-83) by pioneers filtering into the region from Virginia and the Carolinas.
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Baxley

Baxley

Baxley, the seat of Appling County, is located in the wiregrass region of southeastern Georgia. Most of the town's early economic development stemmed from the timber rafting and naval stores industries that dominated southeast Georgia during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. According to the 2010 U.S.
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Roswell

Roswell

Roswell City Hall
Located twenty miles north of Atlanta on the Chattahoochee River, Roswell was originally in Cobb County but in 1932 was annexed to
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Augusta

Augusta

Rains Hall
Augusta is Georgia's second oldest and second largest city and is the seat of Richmond County. Nature helped determine the course of Augusta's history.
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Johnny Mercer (1909-1976)

Johnny Mercer (1909-1976)

Johnny Mercer
While Johnny Mercer had the talent, Georgia provided the inspiration that made him one of America's most popular and successful songwriters of the twentieth century. Between 1929 and 1976 Mercer penned lyrics to more than 1,000 songs, received nineteen Academy Award nominations, wrote music for a number of Broadway shows, and cofounded Capitol Records.
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Xeriscape Gardening

Xeriscape Gardening

Xeriscape Gardening
Xeriscape (pronounced "zera-scape"), a term coined in Colorado in 1981, is loosely defined as a water-conserving method of landscaping in dry climates. Xeriscape gardening refers to a seven-step approach to conserving landscape water without sacrificing environmental quality. Its importance in Georgia has increased as water shortages and restrictions on outdoor water use have become more common and population growth has placed increasing strain on available water supplies.
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Henry Clay White (1848-1927)

Henry Clay White (1848-1927)

Henry Clay White
An internationally known scientist, Henry Clay White served as professor of chemistry at the University of Georgia from 1872 to 1927. White was especially interested in the application of chemistry to the improvement of crops, and he advanced agricultural science and education in Georgia.
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Jasper Guy Woodroof (1900-1998)

Jasper Guy Woodroof (1900-1998)

Jasper Guy Woodroof
Guy Woodroof, a pioneer in food science and technology and often called the "father of food science," made outstanding scientific and technical contributions to the food industry over the course of his professional career. These ranged from the development of processes and methods for the preservation of fruits and vegetables by freezing and canning to revolutionary techniques for the long-term storage of U.S. military rations.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries