<i>Strange Fruit</i>

Strange Fruit

In hindsight, the controversy that greeted the publication of Lillian Smith's Strange Fruit in 1944 seems unusually heated today. This novel of interracial love was denounced in many places for its "obscenity," although sex is barely mentioned. Massachusetts banned it for a short time; so did the U.S. Post Office. But the book has had many admirers in the years since its publication. It was a commercial success—a best-seller, a Broadway play briefly—and it remains in print in many languages.
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<i>Wise Blood</i>

Wise Blood

One of two novels by Georgia writer Flannery O'ConnorWise Blood is a masterpiece of allegory and farce (a blending of humor and tragedy). O'Connor takes issue with a world in which Jesus is but another moral man, in which the Incarnation is valid only to the unintellectual, and in which people can—through their own actions or natural goodness—save themselves. Published in 1952, Wise Blood is a compelling portrait of isolated characters in their search for spiritual truth.
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Francis Orray Ticknor (1822-1874)

Francis Orray Ticknor (1822-1874)

Physician, poet, and horticulturist, Francis Orray Ticknor wrote memorable Civil War (1861-65) poetry and earned a lasting literary reputation on the merit of a single poem, "Little Giffen," a ballad about a young Tennessee soldier named Isaac Newton Giffen.
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<i>The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter</i>

The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter

The first novel by Georgia writer Carson McCullers, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter is commonly treated as a coming-of-age story by readers and critics alike. Many of the characters in the novel are grotesques, a term in southern literature for those who are known for their exaggerated attributes, unusual characteristics, or obsessive-compulsive thought processes or behaviors.
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Bettie Sellers (1926-2013)

Bettie Sellers (1926-2013)

Bettie Sellers lived and wrote poetry in Young Harris, a small college town in the mountains of north Georgia, for most of her life. She is best known for her poems about life in southern Appalachia. Although Sellers was reared in the Piedmont region, near Griffin, her grandmother grew up in north Georgia's Nacoochee Valley. This heritage stimulated Sellers's interest in Appalachia. After earning a B.A.
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Arthur Crew Inman (1895-1963)

Arthur Crew Inman (1895-1963)

Arthur Crew Inman was a reclusive and unsuccessful poet whose 17-million word diary, extending from 1919 to 1963, provides a panoramic record of people, events, and observations from more than four decades of the twentieth century.
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Bobby Jones (1902-1971)

Bobby Jones (1902-1971)

The greatest amateur golfer ever, Bobby Jones dominated his sport in the 1920s. In the eight seasons from 1923 to 1930, Jones won thirteen major championships, including five U.S. Amateurs, four U.S. Opens, three British Opens, and one British Amateur. On September 27, 1930, he became the only man to win all four major titles in one season, completing the "Grand Slam" of golf. Then, while still in his athletic prime at the age of twenty-eight, he retired from competition to devote more time to his family and his law practice.
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Early Victorian Architecture: Overview

Early Victorian Architecture: Overview

In the forty-five years from 1850 to 1895, architecture in Georgia advanced from simple Greek revival forms to the massive steel-frame skyscraper. In between, architects and builders used a myriad of styles as the state endured a disastrous war, Reconstruction, and economic depressions.
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Sapelo Island

Sapelo Island

Sapelo Island, situated about sixty miles south of Savannah, lies in the center of coastal Georgia's well-defined chain of barrier islands. The 16,500-acre island is Georgia's fourth largest and, excepting the 434-acre African American community of Hog Hammock, is entirely state owned and managed.
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<i>Swamp Water</i>

Swamp Water

The first novel by Vereen Bell, Swamp Water was published initially in serial form in the Saturday Evening Post in November and December 1940, and then in book form by Little, Brown in February 1941. It was an immediate sensation in the South and across the nation. Bell, a native of Cairo, Georgia, edited American Boy-Youth's Companion during the late 1930s, and returned home in 1940 to write fiction full-time.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries