Preservation of Historic Buildings and Places

Throughout Georgia, people preserve historic buildings, districts, and archaeological sites as community revitalization and economic development tools. Since 1966 the National Historic Preservation Act, coupled with state and local legislation, has provided the framework of laws, programs, and incentives to assist citizens with their preservation goals and to protect historic and archaeological properties for current and future generations.
Rehabilitated historic buildings increase the community tax base, enhance property values, generate sales of goods and services, and create jobs. Preserving archaeological sites and artifacts provides valuable scientific, educational, and recreational benefits.
In Georgia core preservation services are provided by the Historic Preservation Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, the office of Public Service and Outreach at the University of Georgia (UGA), the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation, and the state's Regional Preservation Services System.
The Historic Preservation Division administers a wide range of services and programs, including the National Register of Historic Places, federal and state grants and tax incentives, Section 106 (of the National Historic Preservation Act) review, and archaeological technical assistance.
The Public Service and Outreach office at UGA provides hands-on assistance and training through the Certified Local Government program for local designation and design review ordinances, information and education services, community planning, and design assistance.
The Georgia Trust offers a variety of services, including heritage education, neighborhood reinvestment, and Main Street design assistance. The Trust also maintains a statewide revolving fund for advocacy, grants scholarships and awards, and provides information and education.
Preservation planners in Georgia's network of sixteen Regional Development Centers provide preservation assistance to local governments, organizations, and individuals. Working with the Historic Preservation Division, planners effectively bring a full range of preservation-related programs and services to regional and local constituents.
Together these and other agencies and organizations provide education and preservation services to assist Georgia's citizens with the identification and maintenance of the state's historic resources.
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Further Reading
Caring for the Past: Preserving, Rehabilitating and Restoring Historic Buildings ([Washington, D.C.]: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, National Center for Cultural Resources, Heritage Preservation Services Program, Technical Preservation Services, 2001-2).

From the Ground Up: A Preservation Plan for Georgia, 2001-2006 (Atlanta: Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Historic Preservation Division, 2001).

Adam King, ed., "Resources at Risk: Defending Georgia's Hidden Heritage," Early Georgia: A Special Issue (May 2001).
Cite This Article
Talley-McRae, Helen. "Preservation of Historic Buildings and Places." New Georgia Encyclopedia. 07 April 2015. Web. 29 August 2015.
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