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1868-1936

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Explore Georgia’s rich music history

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Color photograph of the National Center for Civil and Human Rights in downtown Atlanta.

National Center for Civil and Human Rights (NCCHR)

Located in downtown Atlanta, the National Center for Civil and Human Rights (NCCHR) is a museum that explores the connections between the U.S. civil rights movement and the global struggle for human rights.

Photograph by Bradley Huchteman

Color photograph of a two-story lobby in the National Center for Civil and Human Rights.

NCCHR Main Lobby

The NCCHR's 42,000 square-foot facility opened in 2014 and receives approximately 200,000 visitors each year.

Photograph by Marco Correa

Color photograph of the American civil rights movement exhibit at Atlanta's National Center for Civil and Human Rights.

NCCHR Exhibit

The center's primary exhibit, "Rolls Down Like Water: The American Civil Rights Movement," incorporates historical images, oral histories, and film footage alongside interactive features.

Photograph from the National Center for Civil and Human Rights

Helen Lewis

Helen Lewis

Helen Lewis, activist and scholar, was a founder of the Appalachian Studies discipline. After moving to Wise, Virginia, in the heart of coal country, in 1955, she came to despise the human and environmental devastation caused by the coal and chemical industry.

Courtesy of Appalachian State University, W.L. Eury Appalachian Collection.

Living Social Justice in Appalachia

Living Social Justice in Appalachia

Living Social Justice in Appalachia was published by the University Press of Kentucky in 2012. Compiled by longtime colleagues Judith Jennings and Patricia Beaver, it contains biographical essays, oral histories, and interviews with Helen Lewis.

Southern Regional Technical College

Southern Regional Technical College

The administrative campus for Southern Regional Technical College, formed in 2015 by the merger of Moultrie Technical College with Southwest Georgia Technical College, is located in Thomasville. The Thomasville campus of Southwest Georgia Tech was established in 1947 for the education of World War II veterans.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Moultrie Technical College

Moultrie Technical College

The main campus of Moultrie Technical College was located in Moultrie, the seat of Colquitt County. Established in 1964, the school catered to the agricultural industry of its service area, which encompassed Colquitt, Tift, Turner, and Worth counties. In 2015 it merged with Southwest Georgia Technical College to form Southern Regional Technical College.

Image from Michael Rivera

Workmen’s Circle Awards Banquet

Workmen’s Circle Awards Banquet

The first Organized Labor and Workmen's Circle Banquet took place in May 1969 at the Sheraton-Biltmore Hotel in Atlanta. Seated from left to right: E. L. Abercrombie, Oliver Singleton, Gid Parham, Joe Jacobs, Robert Shadix, and Harold Bauman. Standing from left to right: Joe Baylan, Irving Gordon, E. T. Kehrer, George Caudelle, Harris Jacobs, John Wright, and James Howard (?).

James Sala and William R. Pullen

James Sala and William R. Pullen

James Sala, a leader in the AFL-CIO, presents a check to William R. Pullen for the establishment of the Southern Labor Archives at Georgia State University in Atlanta, circa 1969.

David B. Gracy

David B. Gracy

David B. Gracy, appointed in 1971 as the first director of the Southern Labor Archives at Georgia State University, sits at his desk in 1974. He remained in the position until 1976.

Leslie Hough

Leslie Hough

Leslie Hough, the second director of the Southern Labor Archives at Georgia State University, is pictured in 1985. Under Hough, the Archives acquired the records of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO) and the United Garment Workers of America, as well as the papers of U.S. secretary of labor W. J. Usery Jr. and labor activist Stetson Kennedy.

Thrash Hall

Thrash Hall

Thrash Hall, on the campus of South Georgia College in Coffee County, is named for the first president of the college and originally housed the school's library. Today the building, pictured circa 2002, serves as the president's office. Founded in 1907, South Georgia College is a four-year institution of the University System of Georgia.

Courtesy of South Georgia College

North Georgia College and State University

North Georgia College and State University

The Blue Ridge Mountains surround the campus of North Georgia College and State University, one of six senior military colleges in the United States.

Courtesy of NGCSU Relations

Middle Georgia College

Middle Georgia College

Courtesy of Tommy Thompson

Rains Hall

Rains Hall

Rains Hall houses the offices of the university president, advancement, and public relations and publications at Augusta State University. The building is named in honor of Colonel George W. Rains, who reopened the Academy of Richmond County after its closure during the Civil War.

Courtesy of Augusta State University

Haygood Hall

Haygood Hall

Haygood Hall (left) and Holsey Hall are pictured in 1899 on the campus of Paine College, a historically Black liberal arts college in Augusta.

Courtesy of Paine College

Lucius Holsey

Lucius Holsey

As bishop of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, Lucius Holsey oversaw the growth of the denomination in his native state of Georgia. He was also instrumental in the establishment of Paine Institute (later Paine College), which opened in Augusta in 1884.

Photograph by Mathew B. Brady. Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration

1891 Paine Institute Class

1891 Paine Institute Class

The 1891 class of the Paine College normal school, which trained preachers and teachers, is pictured. The college was founded in Augusta in 1884 to provide a liberal arts education to African American students of both genders.

Courtesy of Paine College

Paine College Faculty, 1936

Paine College Faculty, 1936

The faculty of Paine College, a historically Black college in Augusta, is pictured in 1936. The faculty was all white upon the college's opening in 1884 and was integrated four years later, when its first Black faculty member, John Wesley Gilbert, was hired.

Courtesy of Paine College

Paine College Basketball Team

Paine College Basketball Team

The Paine College men's basketball team is pictured in 1930. Sitting, left to right: A. Moore, C. Mack, Fair, McFall, Mills. Standing, left to right: Beckham, W. Moore, Snyder, Wallace, Bowman, and Wiggins (coach).

Courtesy of Paine College

Haygood-Holsey Hall

Haygood-Holsey Hall

Haygood-Holsey Hall, pictured in 2010, serves as the administration building for Paine College, a historically Black college in Augusta. The building was constructed in 1978 to replace Haygood Hall, which burned in 1968.

Courtesy of Paine College

Lucius H. Pitts

Lucius H. Pitts

Dr. Lucius Holsey Pitts, a member of the Paine College class of 1941, is pictured in 1971, when he became the college's first Black president.

Courtesy of Paine College

Mary Helm Hall

Mary Helm Hall

Mary Helm Hall, pictured in 2011, is a residence hall at Paine College, a historically Black college in Augusta. The hall was built in 1926 and renovated in 2008.

Courtesy of Paine College

GGC Building B

GGC Building B

Building B, pictured in 2012, is the main administrative and classroom building at Georgia Gwinnett College in Lawrenceville. It was designed by prominent Atlanta architect John Portman.

Photograph by and reprinted by permission of Michael Gagnon

GGC Library

GGC Library

The library at Georgia Gwinnett College, pictured in 2012, was completed in fall 2010. The school was the first four-year public college of the twenty-first century to be created in the United States.

Photograph by and reprinted by permission of Michael Gagnon

GGC Student Center

GGC Student Center

The student center at Georgia Gwinnett College in Lawrenceville, pictured in 2012, was completed in 2010. Georgia Gwinnett, a four-year institution of the University System of Georgia, was created in 2005 and opened with 118 students in 2006.

Photograph by and reprinted by permission of Michael Gagnon

GGC Library Interior

GGC Library Interior

Students gather in the library at Georgia Gwinnett College in Lawrenceville near the end of the 2012 spring semester. Enrollment at the college reached almost 8,000 at the beginning of the 2011-12 school year.

Photograph by and reprinted by permission of Michael Gagnon

GGC Dormitories

GGC Dormitories

Student dormitories, pictured in 2012, opened to students at Georgia Gwinnett College in 2010. Classes began at Georgia Gwinnett, a four-year college in Lawrenceville, in fall 2006.

Photograph by and reprinted by permission of Michael Gagnon

Oconee Fall Line Technical College

Oconee Fall Line Technical College

The administrative campus for Oconee Fall Line Technical College, known as the North Campus, is located in Sandersville. The college was formed in 2011 as a merger of Sandersville Technical College andHeart of Georgia Technical College.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

South Campus, Oconee Fall Line Technical College

South Campus, Oconee Fall Line Technical College

The South Campus of Oconee Fall Line Technical College is located in Dublin, the seat of Laurens County. The college was formed in 2011 as a merger of Heart of Georgia Technical College and Sandersville Technical College.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Flint River Campus

Flint River Campus

The Flint River campus of Southern Crescent Technical College is located in Thomaston, the seat of Upson County. The campus opened in 1961 as the Upson County Area Vocational-Technical School.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Southern Crescent Technical College

Southern Crescent Technical College

The administrative campus for Southern Crescent Technical College is located in Griffin. The college was formed in 2010 as a merger of Griffin Technical College and Flint River Technical College.

Photograph by Michael Rivera

Wiregrass Georgia Technical College

Wiregrass Georgia Technical College

The administrative campus for Wiregrass Georgia Technical College is located in Valdosta. The college was formed in 2010 as a merger of Valdosta Technical College and East Central Technical College.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Ben Hill–Irwin Campus

Ben Hill–Irwin Campus

The Ben Hill–Irwin campus of Wiregrass Georgia Technical College is located in Fitzgerald, the seat of Ben Hill County. The campus opened in 1970 as the Ben Hill–Irwin Area Vocational Institute.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Medical Department Staff

Medical Department Staff

Members of the operating room staff at the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University) in Augusta are pictured in the early 1900s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ric034.

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Georgia Health Sciences University

Georgia Health Sciences University

The original building on the campus of Georgia Health Sciences University, completed in Augusta in 1837, was designed by the architect Charles B. Cluskey. The structure, Cluskey's first major building, is an excellent example of the Greek revival style.

Courtesy of Georgia Health Sciences University

GHSU’s Children’s Medical Center

GHSU’s Children’s Medical Center

Children's Medical Center, a facility of Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta, opened in 1998 and focuses on pediatric and adolescent health care.

Courtesy of Ted Eytan, M.D.

Milton M. Antony

Milton M. Antony

Milton M. Antony, a physician in Augusta, was instrumental in the 1828 founding of the Medical Academy of Georgia, which later became Georgia Health Sciences University.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Augusta City Hospital

Augusta City Hospital

The city hospital in Augusta, built in 1818, served as the first home for Georgia Health Sciences University, from 1828 until the mid-1830s.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Medical Department’s Graduating Class, 1881

Medical Department’s Graduating Class, 1881

Pictured is the 1881 graduating class of the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University). Although women began attending classes at the college in 1875, they were not permitted to enroll as medical students until the 1920s.

Courtesy of Hall County Library System, Georgia Historical Photograph Collection.

New City Hospital

New City Hospital

A new city hospital in Augusta, which opened in 1869 and served for many years as the clinical training site for students at the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University), is pictured in 1894, following a renovation.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

University Hospital

University Hospital

University Hospital, completed in Augusta in 1915, was built for the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University) with the city's backing.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Newton Building

Newton Building

The Newton Building, on the campus of the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University) in Augusta, was occupied by the college from 1913 until 1956. The structure was demolished in 1960.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Expanded University Hospital

Expanded University Hospital

University Hospital, part of Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta, was expanded in the mid-1930s as part of an effort to restore the good rating of the college and its membership in the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

G. Lombard Kelly

G. Lombard Kelly

G. Lombard Kelly served as dean of the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University) from 1934 until 1950, and as the college's first president from 1950 to 1953.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Eugene Talmadge Memorial Hospital

Eugene Talmadge Memorial Hospital

The Eugene Talmadge Memorial Hospital in Augusta, built by the state for the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University), opened in June 1956 with six buildings.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Annie L. McPheeters

Annie L. McPheeters

Annie L. McPheeters, pictured circa 1940, was appointed assistant librarian at the Auburn Branch of the Carnegie Library of Atlanta in 1934. McPheeters was responsible for developing the library's core Negro History Collection, housed today at the Auburn Avenue Research Library.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System. Photograph by Lane Brothers

Library Booktruck

Library Booktruck

Annie L. Watters (McPheeters), pictured in 1934, stands beside the booktruck that she used as a librarian in Greenville, South Carolina. That same year she arrived at the Auburn Branch of the Atlanta Public Library, where she became one of the city's first African American professional librarians.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Annie L. McPheeters

Annie L. McPheeters

Annie L. Watters (McPheeters) stands outside the Auburn Branch of the Atlanta Public Library, circa 1938. McPheeters worked at the Auburn Branch from 1934 until 1949, during which time she launched and expanded the Negro History Collection, housed today at the Auburn Avenue Research Library.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

WERD Broadcast

WERD Broadcast

Atlanta librarian Annie L. McPheeters (center), pictured circa 1955, participates in a Friends of the Library Broadcast on WERD radio. With her are Ernestine Brazeal (left), president of Friends of the Library, and Vivian Beavers, member of Friends of the Library.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Georgia Project Teachers

Georgia Project Teachers

Participants in the Georgia Project attend a summer exchange program in 1998 at the University of Monterrey in Mexico. The Georgia Project was established in 1997 to provide more effective bilingual education to Latino students in the Dalton school system.Reprinted by permission of Erwin Mitchell.

Erwin Mitchell

Erwin Mitchell

Former U.S. congressman Erwin Mitchell, pictured in 1999, founded the Georgia Project in Dalton to improve bilingual education in the city's school system. Active from 1997 until 2007, the Georgia Project sponsored a teacher exchange between instructors in Dalton and Monterrey, Mexico.

Reprinted by permission of Georgia Magazine. Photograph by Kim Bancroft

Monterrey School

Monterrey School

Teachers from Dalton visited Monterrey, Mexico, to improve their understanding of Mexican culture and educational practices as part of the Georgia Project, a teacher exchange program founded in Dalton in 1997.Reprinted by permission of Erwin Mitchell.

Mitchell and Students

Mitchell and Students

Erwin Mitchell visits elementary students in 2000 at Roan Street School in Dalton. In 1997 Mitchell founded the Georgia Project, an innovative teacher exchange program that provided training opportunities for Dalton educators working in bilingual classrooms until 2007.Reprinted by permission of Christopher Lancette.

Georgia Northwestern Technical College

Georgia Northwestern Technical College

The administrative campus of Georgia Northwestern Technical College is located in Rome, in Floyd County. The college's service delivery area includes Catoosa, Chattooga, Dade, Floyd, Gordon, Polk, and Walker counties.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Walker County Campus

Walker County Campus

The Walker County campus of Georgia Northwestern Technical College, formerly known as Northwestern Technical College, is located in Rock Spring. The campus opened in 1966 as the Walker County Area Vocational-Technical School.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Auburn Avenue Research Library

Auburn Avenue Research Library

The Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, pictured in 1994, is located on the west end of the Sweet Auburn historic district in Atlanta. The library offers reference and archival collections dedicated to African American culture and history.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Auburn Branch of the Carnegie Library of Atlanta

Auburn Branch of the Carnegie Library of Atlanta

The Auburn Branch of the Carnegie Library of Atlanta, pictured circa 1935, opened in 1921 and closed in 1959. It was the city's first public library branch for African Americans.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

West Hunter Branch

West Hunter Branch

Pictured circa 1960, the West Hunter Branch of Atlanta's public library system opened in 1949, during the era of public segregation, to serve African American patrons. All the city's libraries were integrated in 1959.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Negro History Collection

Negro History Collection

The Negro History Collection is pictured in 1949 at the West Hunter Branch of the Atlanta Public Library. Renamed the Samuel W. Williams Collection on Black America in 1971, the collection today forms the core archive at the Auburn Avenue Research Library.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System. Photograph by Lane Brothers

Story Hour

Story Hour

Eva Thomas (far left), a public school teacher, leads a story hour program for children in 1944, outside the Auburn Branch of the Carnegie Library of Atlanta. The story hour was a collaborative project between the Atlanta Public Library and the Atlanta Board of Education.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Dedication Program

Dedication Program

The dedication ceremony for the Samuel W. Williams Collection on Black America was held on November 21, 1971, at the Carnegie Library building in downtown Atlanta. Formerly known as the Negro History Collection, the archive is housed today at the Auburn Avenue Research Library.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Westville Potter

Westville Potter

A potter demonstrates his craft to schoolchildren at Historic Westville, a living history museum in west Georgia. The village of Westville opened in 1970 and depicts an 1850s community.

Westville Fiddle Contest

Westville Fiddle Contest

A musician competes in the annual fiddle contest at Westville, a living history museum in west Georgia that re-creates an 1850s village. Past events have included a spring festival, vintage baseball game, and reenactment of a battle between Creek Indians and white settlers.

Tullie Smith Farm

Tullie Smith Farm

The Tullie Smith Farm, located on the the grounds of the Atlanta History Center in Atlanta, re-creates a working farm from the 1840s.

Image from Jim Bowen

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Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village

Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village

Staff members of the Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village, located in Tifton, dress in period costume and interpret the history of the wiregrass region by re-creating the daily activities of the community in the late nineteenth century.

Westville

Westville

A blacksmith is heating iron over forge at Historic Westville, a living history museum in west Georgia.

Image from Historic Westville

Seabrook Village

Seabrook Village

A staff member at Seabrook Village in Liberty County demonstrates the craft of broom making. Seabrook Village depicts an African American Geechee community of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Westville Quilter

Westville Quilter

A quilter at Historic Westville, a living history museum in west Georgia, displays her finished work. The museum depicts a village from the 1850s and includes a church, a school, and several residences.

Forbes Hall

Forbes Hall

Forbes Hall, on the campus of Thomas University in Thomasville, houses the president's office, as well as the administration and athletic offices. The building originally served as the main house of Birdwood Plantation, which was built in 1932 as a winter resort for W. Cameron Forbes, a U.S. ambassador to Japan.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Cameron Forbes

Cameron Forbes

W. Cameron Forbes, a U.S. ambassador to Japan and one-time governor of the Philippines, established Birdwood Plantation in Thomas County in 1932. During the 1950s his plantation was converted into Birdwood College, which later became Thomas University.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Birdwood College Students

Birdwood College Students

Students attend class at Birdwood College, which later became Thomas University, in Thomasville during the 1960s. Enrollment at Birdwood College declined during this decade due to its lack of accreditation and limited academic offerings.

Courtesy of Thomas University

J. Harley Chapman

J. Harley Chapman

J. Harley Chapman founded Birdwood College, a school originally affiliated with the Primitive Baptist denomination, in Thomasville in 1950, and classes began four years later. Known today as Thomas University, the school is a nonsectarian, private, and independent institution offering associate's, bachelor's, and master's degrees.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Birdwood College Graduates

Birdwood College Graduates

Graduates of Birdwood College are pictured in the 1960s. The college, founded in Thomasville by Primitive Baptists, opened in 1954 and operated until 1977, when the school became a nonsectarian institution called Thomas County Community College. By 2000 the college had evolved into Thomas University.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Birdwood Annex

Birdwood Annex

The Birdwood Annex (left) is attached to Forbes Hall, the administration building on the campus of Thomas University in Thomasville. The annex houses faculty offices, as well as the office for institutional advancement.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Thomas University Students

Thomas University Students

Students at Thomas University in Thomasville are pictured circa 2008. The university's student body comes primarily from south Georgia and north Florida to pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees at the private institution.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Georgia Southern University

Georgia Southern University

The 634-acre campus of Georgia Southern University in Statesboro features landscaped lawns, pine forests, and two lakes. Walkways wind through the campus and connect the main academic buildings.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern University

University of Georgia

University of Georgia

An early sketch, circa 1850, of the University of Georgia in Athens depicts the Franklin College quadrangle as seen from the southwest across Broad Street. The architecture of the campus was modeled after that of Yale University in Connecticut, the alma mater of Abraham Baldwin, UGA's first president.

West Georgia College

West Georgia College

The campus of West Georgia College in Carrollton, pictured in 1941, was originally designed as a quadrangle with buildings along three sides. Founded as an agricultural and mechanical school in 1908, the college is known today as the University of West Georgia.

Courtesy of Irvine Sullivan Ingram Library Special Collections, University of West Georgia

Georgia Normal and Industrial College

Georgia Normal and Industrial College

Georgia Normal and Industrial College in Milledgeville, circa 1913. The college, known today as Georgia College and State University, was founded in 1889. The campus employs a quadrangle design on land originally used for a state prison.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #bal001.

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Spelman Seminary

Spelman Seminary

Spelman Seminary in Atlanta, pictured circa 1912-13, was founded in 1881 and became Spelman College in 1924. Five years later, the Atlanta University Center formed, joining the school with other African American institutions in the city.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # ful0992c-86.

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Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School

Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School

Located in Rabun County, in north Georgia, the Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School is one of the largest college-preparatory boarding schools in the South.

Courtesy of Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School

Farm Family at Rabun Gap

Farm Family at Rabun Gap

Just after World War I (1917-18) the Rabun Gap school created the Farm Family Settlement Program. Entire families lived at Rabun Gap; the men learned agriculture, the women learned homemaking and health care, and the children attended school. The Speed family is pictured.

Courtesy of Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School

Rabun Gap Industrial School

Rabun Gap Industrial School

Rabun Gap Industrial School students gather for a photograph outside the school's first building circa 1910. The building was designed by Atlanta architect Haralson Bleckley (son of Rabun County native and judge Logan Bleckley).

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
rab107.

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Andrew and Addie Ritchie

Andrew and Addie Ritchie

Andrew Jackson Ritchie and his wife, Addie Corn Ritchie, founded the Rabun Gap Industrial School in 1905 to serve poor children in the area.

Courtesy of Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School

Wagon and Mules

Wagon and Mules

A couple of Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School students direct a wagon with mules in the late 1920s. The Coit boys' dormitory can be seen in the background.

Courtesy of Rabun Gap-Nacoochee School

Georgia Archives Month, 2009

Georgia Archives Month, 2009

The theme for Georgia Archives Month, 2009, was "Quench Your Thirst for History." Sponsored by the Society of Georgia Archivists, Georgia Archives Month is held each October and celebrated with a variety of exhibitions and programs at archives, libraries, and museums around the state.

Courtesy of Society of Georgia Archivists

Georgia Archives Month, 2014

Georgia Archives Month, 2014

The Society of Georgia Archivists selected the theme "Sweet Tea and Southern Breezes" for Georgia Archives Month in 2014. The monthlong event is held each October and highlights the work and holdings of archives around the state.

Courtesy of Society of Georgia Archivists

Travel Back in Time

Travel Back in Time

Georgia Archives Month, held each year in October, is a celebration of the state's preserved historical record and is sponsored by the Society of Georgia Archivists. The theme for 2010 was "Travel Back in Time."

Courtesy of Society of Georgia Archvists

Carroll Technical Institute

Carroll Technical Institute

Carroll Technical Institute opened in Carrollton in 1968 and retained that name until 2000, when it became West Central Technical College. In 2009 the college merged with West Georgia Technical College.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

LaGrange Campus

LaGrange Campus

The LaGrange campus of West Georgia Technical College is located in LaGrange, the seat of Troup County. The campus opened in 1966 as the Troup County Area Vocational-Technical School.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Video Students

Video Students

Video production, a popular program at West Georgia Technical College, is offered through the school's Digital Media Program and Video Services Department. Students at West Georgia Tech produce television programs and have made award-winning documentaries.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Quick Start

Quick Start

A representative from Quick Start, a nationally recognized program offering free workforce training to new and exisiting companies in Georgia, makes a presentation to business leaders. Quick Start's services help to attract new investment and job creation in the state.

Courtesy of Quick Start

Columbus Technical College

Columbus Technical College

Columbus Technical College serves Chattahoochee, Harris, Muscogee, Quitman, and Stewart counties. The school's most popular programs are in health sciences, including nursing, pharmacy technology, and dental assisting.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Appalachian Campus

Appalachian Campus

The Appalachian campus of Chattahoochee Technical College, formerly known as Appalachian Technical College, is located in Jasper. The campus opened in 1967 as the Pickens Area Vocational-Technical School.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Chattahoochee Technical College

Chattahoochee Technical College

The administrative campus of Chattahoochee Technical College, the largest college in the Technical College System of Georgia, is located in Marietta, in Cobb County. The college's service delivery area covers Bartow, Cherokee, Cobb, Gilmer, Paulding, and Pickens counties.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

North Metro Campus

North Metro Campus

The North Metro campus of Chattahoochee Technical College, formerly known as North Metro Technical College, is located in Bartow County. The campus opened in 1985 to serve northwest Atlanta.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Central Georgia Technical College

Central Georgia Technical College

The Warner Robins campus, pictured circa 2007, serves as the administrative campus of Central Georgia Technical College, following the merger between Central Georgia Tech and Middle Georgia Technical College in 2013.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Central Georgia Technical College

Central Georgia Technical College

The Macon campus of Central Georgia Technical College is pictured circa 2007. In 2013 Central Georgia Tech merged with Middle Georgia Technical College to create an institution with a service delivery area of eleven counties.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Augusta Technical College

Augusta Technical College

The only technical school in Georgia to win the U.S. Secretary of Education's Award of Excellence, Augusta Technical College is especially strong in the areas of computer systems networking and emergency medical technology.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Georgia State University

Georgia State University

Georgia State University, one of four major research institutions in the state, is located in downtown Atlanta. Along with the Augusta University, Georgia Institute of Technology, and the University of Georgia, GSU boasts a high percentage of HOPE scholarship recipients among its in-state freshmen each year.

Courtesy of Georgia State University

Zell Miller

Zell Miller

Zell Miller, the governor of Georgia from 1991 to 1999, created the HOPE scholarship program, which was implemented in 1993. Miller designed the program with the threefold purpose of improving the quality of education in Georgia's high schools and colleges, encouraging top Georgia students to attend college in the state, and addressing racial and economic disparities in student enrollment at state institutions.

Oil portrait by Thomas V. Nash, Roswell

Fort Valley State University

Fort Valley State University

Fort Valley State University, located in Peach County, is one of ten historically Black colleges and universities in the state. Since the advent of the HOPE scholarship program in 1993, enrollment by Georgia students at historically Black schools in other states has decreased.

Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College was chartered in 1879 and built in Milledgeville, a former state capital, on property formerly used to house state government. Today its students are current and future members of the U.S. military.

Courtesy of Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College Drill Team

Georgia Military College Drill Team

Members of the prize-winning Georgia Military College drill team are pictured in 1887 outside the Old Capitol Building, on the school's campus in Milledgeville.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal036.

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Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College

The Old Capitol Building in Milledgeville can be seen through the Georgia Military College gateway, circa 1940. The Gothic Revival building became the main facility for the college in 1880. In 1941 the building was severely damaged by fire and later rebuilt.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal060.

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Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College

Students at Georgia Military College in Milledgeville participate in a chemistry laboratory class. Chartered in 1879, the college developed a close relationship with the U.S. military during the 1930s and was designated a military junior college in 1950.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal159.

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Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College

In 2005 the New Academic Building opened at Georgia Military College in Milledgeville.