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Georgiacetus vogtlensis

Georgiacetus vogtlensis

Though scientists long believed that proto-whales may have been amphibious, the discovery of a nearly complete Georgiacetus skeleton by researchers at Georgia Southern University suggests that it was fully marine as depicted in this artist's rendering.  

Photograph by Nobu Tamura

Georgiacetus vogtlensis

Georgiacetus vogtlensis

Three individual Georgiacetus whales were unearthed from 40-million-year-old sediments during the construction of Plant Vogtle. Researchers named the fossils Goergiacetus vogtlensis, meaning "Georgia Whale from Plant Vogtle."

Courtesy of Georgia Southern University Museum

Georgiacetus vogtlensis

Georgiacetus vogtlensis

The living Georgiacetus whale was estimated to be eleven feet long, based on the skull, which was itself about thirty inches long. 

Courtesy Georgia Southern University Museum

Georgiacetus Whale

Georgiacetus Whale

The Georgiacetus whale, an early ancestor of the modern whale, lived in the shallow sea that covered Georgia during the Eocene epoch (of the Paleogene period). The whale's hind legs and hips were functional.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Map of Georgia, 1851

Map of Georgia, 1851

William G. Bonner's Pocket Map of the State of Georgia was published in Milledgeville in 1851. Bonner was a civil engineer who published a series of pocket maps in the mid-nineteenth century.

Eliza Ann Grier

Eliza Ann Grier

Eliza Ann Grier was the first African American woman licensed to practice medicine in the state of Georgia. After her graduation in 1897 from the Woman's Medical College in Pennsylvania (later part of Drexel University College of Medicine), she practiced in Atlanta for a few years.

Image from National Library of Medicine

Henry Rutherford Butler

Henry Rutherford Butler

Henry Rutherford Butler, pictured circa 1883, was a prominent physician and pharmacist on Atlanta's Sweet Auburn Avenue in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His wife, Selena Sloan Butler, was a well-known education advocate in the city.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Henry Rutherford Butler

Henry Rutherford Butler

Henry Rutherford Butler, a pioneer in medicine and health care for African Americans, served in 1891 as surgeon of the Second Georgia Battalion, Colored Volunteers, with the rank of first lieutenant. That same year Rutherford began his medical practice on Atlanta's Wheat Street (later Auburn Avenue).

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Thomas Heathe Slater

Thomas Heathe Slater

Thomas Heathe Slater (third row, far right) and Henry Rutherford Butler (top row, fourth from left) were classmates together at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. After graduating in 1890, they became the first African Americans to obtain a pharmacy license in Georgia. In 1891 the two opened a drugstore together in Atlanta and operated it for two decades.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System

Medical Department Staff

Medical Department Staff

Members of the operating room staff at the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University) in Augusta are pictured in the early 1900s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ric034.

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Georgia Health Sciences University

Georgia Health Sciences University

The original building on the campus of Georgia Health Sciences University, completed in Augusta in 1837, was designed by the architect Charles B. Cluskey. The structure, Cluskey's first major building, is an excellent example of the Greek revival style.

Courtesy of Georgia Health Sciences University

GHSU’s Children’s Medical Center

GHSU’s Children’s Medical Center

Children's Medical Center, a facility of Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta, opened in 1998 and focuses on pediatric and adolescent health care.

Courtesy of Ted Eytan, M.D.

Milton M. Antony

Milton M. Antony

Milton M. Antony, a physician in Augusta, was instrumental in the 1828 founding of the Medical Academy of Georgia, which later became Georgia Health Sciences University.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Augusta City Hospital

Augusta City Hospital

The city hospital in Augusta, built in 1818, served as the first home for Georgia Health Sciences University, from 1828 until the mid-1830s.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Medical Department’s Graduating Class, 1881

Medical Department’s Graduating Class, 1881

Pictured is the 1881 graduating class of the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University). Although women began attending classes at the college in 1875, they were not permitted to enroll as medical students until the 1920s.

Courtesy of Hall County Library System, Georgia Historical Photograph Collection.

New City Hospital

New City Hospital

A new city hospital in Augusta, which opened in 1869 and served for many years as the clinical training site for students at the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University), is pictured in 1894, following a renovation.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

University Hospital

University Hospital

University Hospital, completed in Augusta in 1915, was built for the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University) with the city's backing.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Newton Building

Newton Building

The Newton Building, on the campus of the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University) in Augusta, was occupied by the college from 1913 until 1956. The structure was demolished in 1960.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Expanded University Hospital

Expanded University Hospital

University Hospital, part of Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta, was expanded in the mid-1930s as part of an effort to restore the good rating of the college and its membership in the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

G. Lombard Kelly

G. Lombard Kelly

G. Lombard Kelly served as dean of the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University) from 1934 until 1950, and as the college's first president from 1950 to 1953.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Eugene Talmadge Memorial Hospital

Eugene Talmadge Memorial Hospital

The Eugene Talmadge Memorial Hospital in Augusta, built by the state for the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University), opened in June 1956 with six buildings.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Transgenic Tobacco Plants

Transgenic Tobacco Plants

Transgenic, or genetically modified, tobacco plants grow in the laboratory of geneticist Richard Meagher at the University of Georgia.

Photograph by Sarah E. McKee, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Tobacco

Tobacco

A tobacco farm in south Georgia. While researchers in Georgia have made advances in the field of genetic engineering to develop crops that are resistant to weeds and insects, most genetics research on tobacco in the state examines the plant's impact on public health.

Photograph from CAES Newsire, University of Georgia

Peanuts

Peanuts

Georgia is the top producer of peanuts in the United States. Farmers in the state rely on genetics research, conducted at the National Peanut Research Laboratory in Dawson, the University of Georgia Tifton campus, and the Georgia Experiment Station in Griffin, to enhance peanut plants for higher yield and quality.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive.

National Peanut Research Laboratory

National Peanut Research Laboratory

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Peanut Laboratory in Dawson conducts a range of peanut breeding and genetics research to enhance the agricultural production and quality of peanuts.

Courtesy of Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Bedspring Peanut Pickers

Bedspring Peanut Pickers

One of the many innovations introduced by Naomi Chapman Woodroof, an early pioneer in peanut research, was the use of bedsprings to separate peanuts from the plant during harvest. Woodroof worked at the Coastal Plain Experiment Station (later University of Georgia Tifton campus) from 1933 to 1967.

Courtesy of Jane Woodroof Akers

Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

Transgenic arabidopsis plants grow in the laboratory of geneticist Richard Meagher at the University of Georgia. Arabidopsis plants are commonly used in genetic engineering research because they grow and produce seeds quickly, allowing researchers to produce many generations in a relatively short period of time.

Photograph by Sarah E. McKee, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Gene Gun

Gene Gun

A gene gun shoots small gold particles coated with selected genes from one organism into the plasma membrane of a target organism. The genes contain information for desirable traits, such as disease resistance, that researchers hope will be expressed by the target organism.

Photograph by Sarah E. McKee, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Transgenic Arabidopsis Seedlings

Transgenic Arabidopsis Seedlings

Arabidopsis seedlings genetically engineered to resist toxic heavy metals grow on the right side of a petri dish in Richard Meagher's genetics laboratory at the University of Georgia. (Wild-type plants grow on the left.) Plants resistant to heavy metals and other toxins are used to clean the environment in a process known as phytoremediation.

Photograph by Melissa Pischke LeBlanc

Transgenic Pearl Millet Plants

Transgenic Pearl Millet Plants

Genetically engineered, or transgenic, pearl millet plants grow in the lab of Peggy Ozais-Akins at the Coastal Plain Experiment Station (later University of Georgia Tifton campus) in Tifton. Ozais-Akins developed a system to make a transgenic pearl millet cell that can be genetically modified quickly and then coaxed to grow into a fertile plant.

Courtesy of Peggy Ozais-Akins

Transgenic Yellow Poplar

Transgenic Yellow Poplar

Transgenic (genetically modified) yellow poplar trees grow in the laboratory of geneticist Richard Meagher at the University of Georgia. Researchers at UGA engineered a strain of yellow poplar capable of growing in soil contaminated with mercury and converting the metal into a less harmful form. The process of using plants to remove toxins from the environment is called phytoremediation.

Photograph by Sarah E. McKee, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Cotton Plants

Cotton Plants

Cotton plays a significant role in the state's economy. In order to increase crop yield and minimize dangerous pesticide use, many Georgia farmers grow cotton plants that are genetically modified to resist insects and specific herbicides. By 2004 such transgenic cotton accounted for 95 percent of Georgia's total crop.

Courtesy of Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Budworms

Budworms

Budworms are pest insects that cause significant problems for cotton farmers in Georgia. Through advances in genetic engineering, scientists have developed a cotton plant resistant to budworms and other pests, including bollworms and spider mites.

Courtesy of Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Piedmont Hospital

Piedmont Hospital

Piedmont Hospital, located in the Buckhead community of Atlanta, is a private, not-for-profit institution founded in 1905. An acute tertiary-care facility, Piedmont Hospital is the flagship institution of Piedmont Healthcare.

Courtesy of Piedmont Hospital Archives

Piedmont Hospital

Piedmont Hospital

The first facility for Piedmont Hospital, pictured circa 1915, was a fifteen-room home located at the corner of Capitol Avenue and Crumley Street in downtown Atlanta. The hospital, founded in 1905 as Piedmont Sanatorium, remained in this location until 1957.

Courtesy of Piedmont Hospital Archives

Ludwig Amster

Ludwig Amster

Dr. Ludwig Amster, a specialist in gastrointestinal diseases, stands outside the Piedmont Sanatorium circa 1920. Amster founded the facility, known today as Piedmont Hospital, in 1905 with surgeon Dr. Floyd W. McRae Sr.

Courtesy of Piedmont Hospital Archives

Floyd W. McRae Sr.

Floyd W. McRae Sr.

Dr. Floyd W. McRae Sr., pictured in 1895, was a surgeon and the cofounder of Piedmont Sanatorium (later Piedmont Hospital), which opened in 1905 in downtown Atlanta.

Photograph from C. W. Motes, in Piedmont Hospital Archives

Piedmont Hospital

Piedmont Hospital

In 1957 Piedmont Hosptial, pictured circa 1960, moved from downtown Atlanta to the Buckhead community of Atlanta. At that time the facility had 250 beds and a staff of 127 physicians.

Courtesy of Piedmont Hospital Archives

Congregation Mickve Israel

Congregation Mickve Israel

Congregation Mickve Israel in Savannah is the oldest Jewish congregation in the South and the third oldest in the United States. The congregation was founded during the establishment of the colony in 1733, and the current temple building was completed in 1878.

Photograph by Mark Kortum 

Coastal Plain Sediments

Coastal Plain Sediments

Strata of nonmarine sediments are pictured just across the state line in Phenix City, Alabama. Alternating layers of marine and nonmarine rock formations in the Coastal Plain reveal that long-term fluctuations in sea level occurred in Georgia throughout the Late Cretaceous period.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Columbus Fall Line

Columbus Fall Line

One end of Georgia's fall line, which marks the boundary between the hard rocks of the Piedmont geologic province and the softer rocks of the Coastal Plain, is located in Columbus. Marked by waterfalls and rapids, the fall line stretches across the state to Augusta.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

High Falls

High Falls

High Falls is located along the fall line at High Falls State Park in Butts County. The fall line crosses the state from Augusta to Columbus and marks the point at which the hard rocks of the Piedmont meet the softer rocks of the Coastal Plain.

Image from Stephen Rahn

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Geographic Regions of Georgia

Geographic Regions of Georgia

Georgia encompasses parts of five distinct geographic regions: the Appalachian Plateau, the Valley and Ridge, the Blue Ridge, the Piedmont, and the Coastal Plain.

Courtesy of Pamela J. W. Gore

Triassic Rock Cores

Triassic Rock Cores

Rock cores dating from the Triassic Period represent the oldest geologic layer in Georgia, which is composed of red sandstones, conglomerates, shales, and other nonmarine sediments. Triassic-age rocks are not visible at the surface in Georgia and were detected through seismic profiling and deep drilling.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Late Cretaceous Clam

Late Cretaceous Clam

This fossil of a Late Cretaceous clam, Crassatellites roodensis, features a hole bored by a type of snail known as a naticid. Such holes were a cause of mortality for many clam species during this period.

Photograph by David R. Schwimmer

Late Cretaceous Oyster

Late Cretaceous Oyster

The Late Cretaceous oyster, Crassostrea cusseta, pictured alongside a hammer measuring 33 centimeters in length, could grow to 60 centimeters. This specimen was found at the Blufftown Formation in Stewart County.

Photograph by David R. Schwimmer

Providence Canyon

Providence Canyon

Providence Canyon, in Stewart County, reveals the white Providence Sand, which dates to the Late Cretaceous period, lying beneath the reddish Clayton Formation, which formed during the Paleogene period.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Kaolin Mine

Kaolin Mine

Kaolinite clay, which formed in Georgia during the Late Cretaceous and Early Paleogene periods, is found in deposits running parallel to the fall line, which stretches from Augusta to Columbus. The mining of kaolin mining, which is used in the manufacture of various products, is an important industry in the state.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Tivola Limestone

Tivola Limestone

Pictured near Perry, in Houston County, the Tivola Limestone formed during the Late Eocene epoch, when sea levels in the region were particularly high. The Tivola is considered to be an extension of the Ocala Limestone, a white, fossiliferous limestone that formed during the Late Eocene in the Dougherty Plain of southwest Georgia.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Shark Teeth

Shark Teeth

This set of shark teeth (Scapanorhyhcus texanus) was found in the Blufftown Formation, a highly fossilferous Cretaceous formation in the Chattahoochee Valley of southwest Georgia.

Courtesy of David R. Schwimmer

Georgiaites

Georgiaites

Georgiaites, or tektites, are natural glasses formed when an asteroid or meteorite collides with the earth. Many scientists believe that georgiaites formed as a result of the meteorite impact that created the Chesapeake Bay Crater in Virginia around 35 million years ago.

Photograph by Edward Albin

Georgia State Capitol

Georgia State Capitol

The state capitol building, completed in 1889, features a cornerstone, interior floor and steps, and many walls made of Georgia marble. Marble mined in the state was also used to construct 60 percent of the monuments and the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Georgia Marble Company

Georgia Marble Company

A gang saw at the first plant built by the Georgia Marble Company in Pickens County is pictured circa 1885. The company was founded in 1884 by Samuel Tate, who in the 1830s purchased large tracts of land containing marble in north Georgia.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck285-85.

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Tate and Foremen

Tate and Foremen

Colonel Sam Tate (second from left), the grandson of Georgia Marble Company founder Samuel Tate, poses with a group of foremen at the Pickens County plant, circa 1925. Colonel Sam served as president of the company from 1905 until his death in 1938.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck111-82.

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Georgia Marble Company

Georgia Marble Company

Colonel Sam Tate, the president of the Georgia Marble Company, oversees the production of a marble bench in the Pickens County plant, circa 1930. The marble industry in the state prospered during the early 1930s but suffered losses from 1933 through the rest of the decade.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck250-85.

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Ground Marble Products

Ground Marble Products

Sacks of ground or pulverized marble are produced at the Calcium Products Division of the Georgia Marble Company in Tate (Pickens County), circa 1950. The division was created in 1947 to sell "waste" marble, which is used as filler in paints and plastics. Ground marble products became the company's main product by the late 1980s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #pck253-85.

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Marble Slabs

Marble Slabs

Marble slabs used to make columns during reconstruction work on the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., are cut at the Georgia Marble Company in Pickens County, circa 1958.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck043-82.

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Marblehill Quarry

Marblehill Quarry

Workers for the Georgia Marble Company sit for a portrait during the 1920s at the Marblehill Quarry in Pickens County. Marble from Pickens County is reported to have been used in around 60 percent of the monuments in Washington, D.C.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
pck018-82.

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Saint Joseph’s Nurses

Saint Joseph’s Nurses

Graduates of Saint Joseph's Nursing School in Atlanta pose in 1906. The nursing school opened in 1900 and operated until 1973, graduating a total of more than 1,300 nurses.

Courtesy of Saint Joseph's Hospital

Saint Joseph’s Hospital

Saint Joseph’s Hospital

Saint Joseph's Hospital, located on a thirty-two-acre campus in north Atlanta since 1973, is the oldest medical facility in Atlanta. Founded by Catholic nuns in 1880, Saint Joseph's is nationally recognized for excellence in both patient care and research.

Courtesy of Saint Joseph's Hospital

Surgery at Saint Joseph’s

Surgery at Saint Joseph’s

Saint Joseph's Hospital in Atlanta has been a forerunner in the Southeast for developing surgical procedures, from performing the region's first open-heart surgery in 1957 to utilizing minimally invasive robotic surgery in the twenty-first century.

Courtesy of Saint Joseph's Hospital

Atlanta Hospital

Atlanta Hospital

Saint Joseph's Hospital, originally known as Atlanta Hospital, first opened in a home on Baker Street in Atlanta. The facility later moved to a building on Courtland Street before dedicating its current location in north Atlanta in 1973.

Courtesy of Saint Joseph's Hospital

Mercy Care Services

Mercy Care Services

As part of its original mission to offer medical care to the poor, Saint Joseph's Hospital in Atlanta operates the Mercy Care Services program, which includes two health clinics and eight mobile satellite locations as of 2007.

Courtesy of Saint Joseph's Hospital

Leila Denmark

Leila Denmark

Leila Denmark, a pediatrician in Alpharetta, examines a patient. Denmark opened her practice in 1931 and retired in 2001, at the age of 103, as the oldest practicing pediatrician in the nation. In addition to running her private practice, Denmark conducted research that led to the development of the pertussis (or whooping cough) vaccine.

Courtesy of Jack Tarver Library Special Collections, Mercer University

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta was formed in 1998 by the merger of Egleston Children's Health Care System and the Scottish Rite Children's Medical Center. A not-for-profit pediatric hospital, Children's served approximately 493,000 patients in 2005.

Courtesy of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Scottish Rite Convalescent Home

Scottish Rite Convalescent Home

The Scottish Rite Convalescent Home for Crippled Children, pictured circa 1916, consisted of two wood-frame cottages. The facility opened in Decatur in 1915 and provided post-surgical care to indigent children.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
dek014.

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Liver Transplant Patient

Liver Transplant Patient

In 2003 Dante Priebe (right) underwent a successful liver-transplant operation, performed by Dr. Thomas Heffron (left) at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

Courtesy of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Scottish Rite Hospital

Scottish Rite Hospital

Patients at the Scottish Rite Hospital for Crippled Children in Decatur are pictured circa 1920. Founded in 1915, the Scottish Rite Hospital merged with the Henrietta Egleston Hospital for Children in 1998 to form Children's Healthcare of Atlanta.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
dek022.

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Cloudland Canyon

Cloudland Canyon

Exposed layers of sandstone are visible in the walls of Cloudland Canyon, part of the Appalachain Plateau geologic province in the northwest corner of Georgia. The vegetated slopes below the sandstone contain gray shale with interbedded sandstone, siderite, and coal.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Lookout Mountain

Lookout Mountain

Lookout Mountain, located in Dade County, is part of the Appalachian Plateau geologic province. Georgia shares the mountain with Alabama and Tennessee.

Image from Andy Montgomery

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Appalachian Plateau

Appalachian Plateau

Lookout Mountain, in Walker County, which is part of the Appalachian Plateau.

Railroad Cut

Railroad Cut

An old coal-mining railroad cut runs near Lula Lake and Falls in Walker County, part of the Appalachian Plateau geologic province. The coalfield beneath the Appalachian Plateau, which extends from New York to Alabama, has had a significant economic and cultural impact on the region.

Rock Town

Rock Town

Rock Town, located on Pigeon Mountain in Walker County, is a natural rock formation composed of sandstone layers interbedded with shales. Pigeon Mountain is part of the Appalachian Plateau geologic province.

Emory University Hospital

Emory University Hospital

Emory University Hospital, located on the campus of Emory University in Atlanta, is a tertiary care facility. Staffed by 1500 physicians, the facility has been the site of several important milestones in the medical history of Georgia, including the performance of the state's first heart, kidney, and lung transplants.

Courtesy of Emory University Hospital

Wesley Memorial Nurses

Wesley Memorial Nurses

A class of graduating nurses poses outside Wesley Memorial Hospital in Atlanta, later Emory University Hospital, in 1916. Wesley Memorial, chartered in 1904, was located in a mansion on Courtland Street until 1922, when the hospital moved to the Emory University campus in DeKalb County.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ful0408.

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CARE in Afghanistan

CARE in Afghanistan

Students in the Out of School Girls Project, instituted by CARE in 2003, attend school in Afghanistan. CARE, an Atlanta-based humanitarian organization, focuses on the education of women as one means toward fulfilling its mission of eradicating global poverty.

Courtesy of CARE, Photograph by Phil Borges.

CARE Savings and Loan

CARE Savings and Loan

Clara Chinyama, with her daughter Alinafe, poses at the construction site of her new tea shop in Malawi. The shop is funded through a savings and loan program provided by CARE, an Atlanta-based organization that works with women around the world to overcome poverty, disease, and environmental problems.

Courtesy of CARE, Photograph by Valenda Campbell.

Rhesus Macaques

Rhesus Macaques

Rhesus macaques are among the seven species of nonhuman primates studied at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, based in Atlanta at Emory University. These macaques are pictured at the center's field station in Lawrenceville.

Courtesy of Yerkes National Primate Research Center

Yerkes National Primate Research Center

Yerkes National Primate Research Center

The main center of the Yerkes National Primate Research Center comprises the Neuroscience Building (left), the original building (center), and the Emory Vaccine Center (right). Emory University assumed ownership of the center in 1956.

Courtesy of Yerkes National Primate Research Center

Robert Mearns Yerkes

Robert Mearns Yerkes

Robert Mearns Yerkes, pictured in Orange Park, Florida, founded the Yale Laboratories of Primate Biology in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1928. A year later the facility moved to Orange Park, where it remained until Yerkes's death in 1956. The center was renamed in his honor and relocated to Emory University in Atlanta that same year.

Courtesy of Yerkes National Primate Research Center

Yerkes Researcher

Yerkes Researcher

A researcher at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, based at Emory University in Atlanta, works in the Biomarkers Core laboratory. The biomedical research conducted at the center helps to provide treatment and prevention strategies for human illnesses.

Courtesy of Yerkes National Primate Research Center

Arthritis Foundation Headquarters

Arthritis Foundation Headquarters

Arthritis Today, a bimonthly magazine produced by the Arthritis Foundation, provides information and support to arthritis patients around the country. Established in 1948 and based in Atlanta, the Arthritis Foundation is the largest voluntary health organization in the United States.

Photograph by Daniel Mayer

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Fernbank Science Center

Fernbank Science Center

The Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta offers a variety of science education programs to the public in its planetarium, observatory, and exhibit hall. The center also offers tours through the Fernbank Forest, a sixty-five acre primeval forest adjoining the center's grounds.

Courtesy of Fernbank Science Center

Fernbank Forest

Fernbank Forest

One of the few stands of original oak and hickory forests remaining in Georgia is located at Fernbank Forest in Atlanta. Trail guides at the Fernbank Science Center offer programs in the forest for both students and the general public throughout the year.

Courtesy of Fernbank Science Center

Fernbank Planetarium

Fernbank Planetarium

The Jim Cherry Memorial Planetarium at the Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta houses more than 200 projectors, including the Carl Zeiss Mark V projector, which are used to simulate the night sky for students and visitors.

Image from Ryan Stavely

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Pine Mountain

Pine Mountain

Pine Mountain, located in Harris County, is part of the Piedmont geologic province. Located between the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Coastal Plain, the Piedmont forms the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, which formed during the Paleozoic era.

Graves Mountain

Graves Mountain

Graves Mountain, located in Lincoln County, is part of the Piedmont geologic province. Among the many minerals found on the mountain are kyanite, which is used in ceramics and for insulation, and rutile, a major ore of the metal alloy titanium.

Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River

The Chattahoochee River flows through Columbus, one of the cities located along the fall line marking the boundary between the Piedmont and Coastal Plain geologic provinces. The hard rocks of the Piedmont form outcrops that create rapids and waterfalls along the fall line.

Photograph by andrewI04 

Ammonite

Ammonite

Ammonites, now extinct, were a type of cephalopod found in the Coastal Plain during the Late Cretaceous. This specimen of Placenticeras benningi measures 10 centimeters in diameter and was found at the Eutaw Formation in Chattahoochee County.

Photograph by David R. Schwimmer

State Fossil

State Fossil

The state fossil of Georgia is the tooth of Carcharocles megalodon, a large shark that became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous period. The pictured specimen, which dates to the Late Miocene, was found near Savannah and measures 11 centimeters.

Photograph by David R. Schwimmer

Late Cretaceous Oyster

Late Cretaceous Oyster

This specimen of Exogyra erraticostata, an oyster common during the Late Cretaceous period on Georgia's Coastal Plain, was found at the Blufftown Formation in Stewart County. It measures approximately 12 centimeters.

Photograph by David R. Schwimmer

Giant Crocodylian

Giant Crocodylian

This composite reconstruction of a skull of Deinosuchus rugosus, a giant crocodylian found on the Coastal Plain of Georgia during the Late Cretaceous, measures 1.1 meters. The crocodylians were larger than the carnivorous dinosaurs found along the coast and are believed to have been the top predators in the region around 82 to 75 million years ago.

From King of the Crocodylians, by D. R. Schwimmer. Reproduced by permission of David R. Schwimmer

Mastodon Tooth

Mastodon Tooth

This molar tooth of the mastodon Mammut americanum, with a crown length of 14 centimeters, was found in Stewart County. Both mastodons and mammoths roamed the Coastal Plain during the Ice Age.

Photograph by David R. Schwimmer

Bored Lignite

Bored Lignite

This specimen of Late Cretaceous wood, preserved as lignite, was found at the Eutaw Formation in Chattahoochee County. The wood contains holes that were bored by clams, or "shipworms."

Photograph by David R. Schwimmer

Crab Burrows

Crab Burrows

Fossilized crab burrows on Cumberland Island were formed in sand deposits during the Pleistocene. Such burrows are found throughout the barrier islands and are typically about one meter deep.

Photograph by David R. Schwimmer

Rising Fawn Thrust Fault

Rising Fawn Thrust Fault

The Rising Fawn thrust fault, located in the Valley and Ridge geologic province of northwest Georgia, was formed during the Alleghanian orogeny, the third mountain-building event of the Paleozoic Era.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Taylor Ridge

Taylor Ridge

Rock strata of Taylor Ridge, part of the Valley and Ridge geographic province, are visible from Interstate 75, which runs through Ringgold Gap in northwest Georgia. The ridges of the province are formed of hard layers of sandstone or chert, while the valleys are composed of softer shale and limestone.

Courtesy of Tim Chowns

Rockmart Slate Folds

Rockmart Slate Folds

Slate folds, which formed during the mountain-building events of the Paleozoic Era, are visible around Rockmart in the Valley and Ridge geologic province of northwest Georgia.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Carters Dam Fault

Carters Dam Fault

The Carters Dam Fault, located near Cartersville, is part of the fault system that separates the Piedmont region from the Valley and Ridge. Cambrian shale of the Valley and Ridge is visible to the left of the fault, while the metamorphic rock of the Piedmont is visible on the right.

Photograph by Chuck Cochran

Medical Research

Medical Research

Jin-Xiong She, the director of the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University) in Augusta, observes a researcher at work, circa 2006. The center engages in interdisciplinary research to develop treatments for such diseases as diabetes and cancer.

Photograph by Phil Jones

Center for Medical Genomics

Center for Medical Genomics

Mark Bouzyk, director of the Center for Medical Genomics at Emory University, watches a research assistant prepare samples for DNA extraction. Emory supports one of the nation's largest academic genetics departments.

Photograph by Janet Nichols

Georgia Health Sciences University

Georgia Health Sciences University

Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta supports the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, which promotes genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics research in an interdisciplinary setting.

Photograph by Phil Jones

Malthus Ward Grave site

Malthus Ward Grave site

The Athens Garden Club installed a marker at the grave site of Malthus Ward, the first professor of natural history at the University of Georgia, in 1987. After leaving the university in 1842, Ward opened a commercial garden in Athens and founded the Horticultural Society of Georgia.

Photograph by LeAnna Biles Schooley

Malthus Ward Home

Malthus Ward Home

Trees planted by natural historian Malthus Ward during the 1830s still stand outside his former home on Dearing Street in Athens. During his tenure as a professor at the University of Georgia, Ward maintained a botanical garden on the property.

Photograph by LeAnna Biles Schooley

Robert B. Greenblatt

Robert B. Greenblatt

Robert B. Greenblatt, a native of Montreal, Canada, is credited with pioneering the discipline of endocrinology during his tenure at the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University) in Augusta, where he served as chair of the endocrinology department from 1946 to 1972.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Robert B. Greenblatt

Robert B. Greenblatt

During World War II, noted endocrinologist Robert B. Greenblatt joined the U.S. Navy. During his service, Greenblatt studied the effects of the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library

Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library

In 1988 the library at Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta was renamed in memory of Robert B. Greenblatt, the renowned endocrinologist who performed groundbreaking infertility research at the institution.

Photograph by Phil Jones, Georgia Health Sciences University

Central State Hospital

Central State Hospital

Central State Hospital in Milledgeville, pictured in 2000, has provided mental health care in Georgia since 1837. Today the hospital's services include specialized care for adolescents and adults, as well as secure facilities for the state's criminal-justice system.

Courtesy of Central State Hospital

Georgia State Sanitarium

Georgia State Sanitarium

This tinted postcard of the Georgia State Sanitarium (later Central State Hospital) depicts the grounds of the institution circa 1905. During this time the hospital was under the leadership of Theophilus O. Powell, who implemented more precise methods of diagnosis.

Courtesy of Melinda Smith Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Vandiver Visits Sanitarium

Vandiver Visits Sanitarium

Governor Ernest Vandiver (second from left) inspects the food at the Georgia State Sanitarium (later Central State Hospital) in 1959. As governor, Vandiver encouraged the hospital to move from a medical to a mixed-therapy model of mental health care. Journalist Celestine Sibley stands behind Vandiver.

Lula Lake and Falls

Lula Lake and Falls

Lula Lake and Lula Falls in Walker County showcase Georgia's natural geologic beauty, which draws visitors to the state each year.

Image from Jeff Moore

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Blue Ridge Mountains

Blue Ridge Mountains

Cove Road, a few miles east of Jasper in the Blue Ridge geological province of Georgia, cuts through an outcrop of red mica schist and white marble in the Murphy marble belt.

Courtesy of T.E. LaTour

Providence Canyon

Providence Canyon

The unconsolidated sandstone bluffs of Providence Canyon in Stewart County were formed during the Cretaceous Period and are among the oldest exposed Coastal Plains rock formations in the state.

Courtesy of Matthew M. Moye

Dinosaur Tooth

Dinosaur Tooth

A tooth of the Appalachiosaurus montgomeriensis, a relative of Tyrannosaurus rex, was discovered among other fossil remains in Stewart County. The tooth is 4 cm long.

Courtesy of David Schwimmer

Kaolin

Kaolin

Kaolin, a clay used for the production of ceramics, medicine, and paper, is an important economic resource in Georgia. Formed during the Paleogene Period, kaolin is found in the central and eastern areas of the Coastal Plain.

Courtesy of Forrest Shropshire

Cumberland Island Dunes

Cumberland Island Dunes

Sand dunes form along the coast of Cumberland Island off the coast of Georgia. Dunes are the primary geological feature of the state's barrier islands and represent the youngest geological deposits in the state.

Image from anoldent

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Granite

Granite

The Oglesby Quarry in Elberton, abandoned in 2003, is one of the many granite quarries to contribute to Georgia's economy. Formed approximately 1 billion years ago, granite is one of the oldest rock types found in Georgia.

Photograph by Clay Ouzts

Tallulah Falls

Tallulah Falls

Tallulah Falls are today part of the Tallulah Gorge State Park in northeast Georgia.

Image from Rain0975

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Grenville Gneiss

Grenville Gneiss

The Grenville gneisses were formed around 1 billion years ago during the Grenville Orogeny. The oldest rocks in Georgia, these gneisses form the "basement" upon which younger rocks were deposited during the formation of the Appalachian mountain chain.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Chattanooga Shale

Chattanooga Shale

The Chattanooga Shale, located in northwest Georgia, was formed approximately 350 million years ago, when the area was covered by a shallow sea.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Stone Mountain

Stone Mountain

Stone Mountain Park encompasses 3,200 acres just sixteen miles east of downtown Atlanta. Formed around 300 million years ago during the Paleozoic Era, the mountain itself is the world's largest mass of exposed granite.

Image from Darryl Pierce

Diabase Dike

Diabase Dike

Diabase dikes, such as the one pictured in Gwinnett County, are composed of a fine-grained igneous rock. They were formed between 180 and 230 million years ago as rifts opened in the Atlantic Ocean basin.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Hadrosaur Fossil

Hadrosaur Fossil

A duck-billed hadrosaur fossil found in Alabama is pictured in 2006. Fossils of the duck-billed hadrosaur, along with those of the carnivore Albertosaurus, are also found in west central Georgia. Dinosaurs lived in Georgia during the Late Cretaceous Period, 65 to 100 million years ago.

Copyright 2006 by David R. Schwimmer. All rights reserved

Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory

Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory

Charles Herty (seated, fourth from left) is pictured with staff members at his Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory, circa 1933. Herty founded the lab in 1931 to develop techniques for producing newsprint from southern pine trees.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ctm033.

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Charles H. Herty

Charles H. Herty

Charles Herty, a native of Milledgeville, was a renowned chemist known for his contributions to both the forestry and paper industries during his career. While a professor at the University of Georgia in the 1890s, Herty also established the university's athletic program.

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society, Foltz Photography Studio (Savannah, Ga.), photographs, 1899-1960, #1360-25-10-14.

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Herty Field

Herty Field

University of Georgia students play baseball in 1893 at a field located on the northwest corner of campus. Charles Herty, a chemistry professor who was named director of the Department of Physical Culture at UGA in 1894, enlarged the field and built a grandstand in 1896. The site was later named Herty Field in his honor.

Herty’s Blanket Award

Herty’s Blanket Award

Charles Herty (far right) is honored as the "father of Georgia athletics" by the University of Georgia's Athletic Association, which presented him with a blanket award in 1934. Other UGA alumni honored on that day include George "Kid" Woodruff, a future Georgia coach (far left), and Sandy Beaver (center).

Foresty Industry Meeting

Foresty Industry Meeting