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Explore Georgia’s rich music history

From blues and soul to classical and country—our Spotify playlists feature 130+ songs written and performed by Georgians.

October 1950

October 1950

GEORGIA Magazine, originally called RURAL GEORGIA, is the state's oldest magazine. 

Courtesy of GEORGIA Magazine

July 1990

July 1990

In 1990 RURAL GEORGIA changed its name to GEORGIA Magazine to reflect its growing popularity in the state's metropolitan centers. 

Courtesy of GEORGIA Magazine

November 2016

November 2016

The November 2016 issue of GEORGIA Magazine featured a cover story on restoration work at Pasaquan, a folk art installation outside Buena Vista. 

Courtesy of GEORGIA Magazine

July 1976

July 1976

RURAL GEORGIA, which later became GEORGIA Magazine, was published in Millen until 1977, when its offices moved to Atlanta. 

Courtesy of GEORGIA Magazine

January 1995

January 1995

The January 1995 issue of GEORGIA Magazine featured articles on winemaking and filmmaking in Georgia. 

Courtesy of GEORGIA Magazine

American Burying Beetle

American Burying Beetle

The American burying beetle, Nicrophorus americanus, is an endangered species and is no longer found in Georgia. Beetles, order Coleoptera, are the largest group of insects, and thousands of species can be found in Georgia.

Photograph by the Frost Museum

European Honeybees

European Honeybees

European honeybees are not native to Georgia, but records show they arrived in the state by 1743. They were named the state insect in 1975. In addition to creating honey, honeybees pollinate several crops, including blueberries, apples, melons, and gourds.

Photograph by Waugsberg

Bombyx mori

Bombyx mori

An adult silkmoth, Bombyx mori. This species's caterpillar, the mulberry silkworm, has produced silk textiles for millennia. Eighteenth-century Georgia colonists tried and failed to establish a silk industry in Savannah.

Photograph by Nikita

Fire Ant

Fire Ant

Solenopsis invicta are an invasive ant species from South America. The species has interbred with native ants to create hybrid ant species that threaten soybean production. All ants are eusocial, which means they live in strict social hiearchies.

Varroa Mite

Varroa Mite

Researchers have attributed recent declines in apiary honeybee populations to parasitic varroa mites, pictured between the bee's wings above. Varroa mites suck drone and developing brood blood, weakening individuals. An untreated varroa infestation may kill colonies.

Photograph by the U.S. Department of Agriculture

Golden Garden Spider

Golden Garden Spider

The golden garden spider, Argiope aurantia, is a member of the orb-web family. Here, an individual uses its spinnerets, located on its abdomen, to trap prey. Spiders are exclusively carnivorous, though the golden garden spider is no danger to humans.

Photograph by Tom McC

Widow Spider

Widow Spider

Widow spiders produce cobwebs and seclude themselves in dark, isolated areas. They have a painful bite, which requires medical attention, but they are rarely fatal.

Photograph by Charaj

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

The eastern tiger swallowtail, Papilo glaucus, is the state butterfly of Georgia. It's common across the eastern United States.

Courtesy of Loy Xingwen

Gus Whalen

Gus Whalen

Gus Whalen, the fourth-generation president and CEO of the Warren Featherbone Company, was a major employer in Gainesville and a noted philanthropist. His advocacy of "intergenerational community learning" brought him national attention in the 2000s. 

©Billy Howard

Bill Hardman Day

Bill Hardman Day

Bill Hardman recieves an award in Atlanta during Bill Hardman Day.

Columbus Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony

Columbus Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony

Governor Carl Sanders cuts the ribbon at the opening of the Columbus Welcome Center, off Interstate 185 on June 8, 1965. Bill Hardman, in glasses, looks on.

Bill Hardman

Bill Hardman

While serving as Georgia's tourism director from 1959 to 1970, Bill Hardman revolutionized the state's image among vacationers. He was the driving force behind the creation of the state's welcome centers and of clever campaigns like "See Georgia First" and "Stay and See Georgia." Through his efforts, the state shed its reputation for speed traps, clip joints, and poor roads.From William Hardman Sr.'s Papers.

Hardman with Tourism Posters

Hardman with Tourism Posters

Hardman, in center with glasses, looks on as Georgia Welcome Center hostesses debut new Georgia tourism posters for 1966.

Vacation in Georgia

Vacation in Georgia

Bill Hardman promoted Georgia at every opportunity through parades, radio and television spots, and trade shows. By 1967 tourist spending in Georgia reached more than $570 million.

Travel South USA

Travel South USA

Bill Hardman became the founding president of the Southern Travel Directors' Council in 1965. The council adopted the "Travel South USA" motto in 1971.

E. D. Rivers

E. D. Rivers

E. D. Rivers speaks in 1939, during his second gubernatorial term, at a gathering in Union County, located in the north Georgia mountains. During his first term, Rivers secured federal funding to support public housing and rural electrification in the state.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #uni005.

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Soybeans

Soybeans

The soybean plant, first introduced to Georgia in 1765, originated in China. The plant was brought to the Georgia colony by Samuel Bowen, who planted it after settling in Savannah. In the latter part of the nineteenth century, the U.S. Department of Agriculture encouraged the cultivation of soybeans in the state.

Photograph by Carl Dennis, Auburn University. Courtesy of IPM Images

Franklin D. Roosevelt at the Little White House

Franklin D. Roosevelt at the Little White House

In 1924, three years after Roosevelt contracted polio, he began visiting Warm Springs in Georgia. The springs were thought to be beneficial for polio victims. Roosevelt, who became the U.S. president in 1932, is pictured in front of the Little White House in Warm Springs.

Cotton Farmers

Cotton Farmers

Members of a Heard County family pose in front of their cotton crop, circa 1900. Residents of the county began raising cotton in the nineteenth century, but many were forced to abandon the crop during the first decades of the twentieth century, in the wake of the boll weevil devastations and the Great Depression.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
hrd005.

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Soybean Pod

Soybean Pod

Soybeans were introduced to the United States by Samuel Bowen, a seaman who brought the seeds from China. At Bowen's request, Henry Yonge planted the first soybean crop on his farm in Thunderbolt, a few miles east of Savannah, in 1765.

Photograph by the United Soybean Board

Oat Harvesting

Oat Harvesting

Alonzo Fields (far right), the farm supervisor at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County, directs the harvesting of oats in 1939. Flint River Farms was an experimental planned community established in 1937 for African American sharecroppers.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF33- 030402-M1 [P&P].

School Campus

School Campus

The school building at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community, an experimental farm established in Macon County for African American sharecroppers, included a schoolhouse, teacher's residence, and related buildings.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

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Farm Houses

Farm Houses

An old and a new house at Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County are pictured in 1937. Cotton grows in the foreground.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection.

Health Clinic

Health Clinic

Dr. Thomas M. Adams and project nurse Lillie Mae McCormick, pictured in 1937, administer a typhoid shot in the health clinic at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF34- 051634-D [P&P] LOT 1541.

Wheat Field

Wheat Field

Project manager Amos Ward (left?) and Farm Security Administration borrower Simon Joiner inspect wheat in 1939 at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County. A variety of crops, including wheat, oats, cotton, pecans, and peaches were grown at the farms.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF33- 030398-M4 [P&P] LOT 1541.

Flint River Farms School

Flint River Farms School

Students, pictured in 1939, gather outside the schoolhouse at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County. A field of oats grows in front of the school.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF34- 051647-D [P&P] LOT 1541.

Elementary Schoolchildren

Elementary Schoolchildren

A classroom of first graders is pictured in 1939 at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County. The school opened to elementary-age children in 1938, and by 1946 it offered classes in all twelve grades.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF34- 051617-D [P&P] LOT 1541.

Home Economics Class

Home Economics Class

Evelyn M. Driver (center) instructs students in home economics and management in 1939 at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF33- 030379-M3 [P&P] LOT 1541.

Farm House

Farm House

An original home from the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community, established in 1937 in Macon County, is pictured in 2006.

Courtesy of Robert Zabawa

Flint River Farms Marker

Flint River Farms Marker

A historical marker commemorating the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County, erected by the Georgia Historical Society, was dedicated in 2005.

Courtesy of Tasha Hargrove

Sidney Root

Sidney Root

Sidney Root, a prominent Atlanta businessman, was an integral part of the Confederate war effort during the Civil War. He later served as the director of the International Cotton Exposition of 1881 in Atlanta and, as park commissioner for the city, was instrumental in the building of Grant Park.

Sidney Root’s House

Sidney Root’s House

After the fall of Atlanta in 1864, during the Civil War, Union troops occupied the home of Atlanta businessman Sidney Root. Root moved his family to New York City after the war and did not return until 1878. In the interim, he sold his house on South Collins Street to Joseph E. Brown, who served as the governor of Georgia during the war.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Primary Bible Questions for Young Children

Primary Bible Questions for Young Children

Sidney Root, a prominent Atlanta business leader and philanthropist, was a devout Baptist. In 1861 he published a booklet called Primary Bible Questions for Young Children, which sold around 20,000 copies. Pictured is the title page from the 1864 edition.

Robert Woodruff and Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans

Robert Woodruff and Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans

Robert Woodruff, the president of the Coca-Cola Company, is pictured with Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans at the Stork Club in New York City, during the 1940s. Evans owned the Atlanta Coca-Cola Bottling Company, founded by her husband Joseph Whitehead, for several decades before selling it to Woodruff in 1932.

Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans

Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans

Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans, a Virginia native, was a prominent businesswoman and philanthropist in Atlanta during the first half of the twentieth century. In 1932 she joined the board of directors for the Coca-Cola Company, becoming one of the first women in the country to serve on the board of a major corporation.

Herman J. Russell

Herman J. Russell

Georgia governor Joe Frank Harris (left) presents Herman J. Russell, an Atlanta entrepreneur and community leader, with the award for the Atlanta Business League's CEO of the Year in 1986.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, Harmon Perry Photograph Collection.

Atlanta Leaders

Atlanta Leaders

Three prominent civil rights leaders from Atlanta gather in 1987 to endorse the candidacy of Richard Arrington Jr. for mayor of Birmingham, Alabama. Arrington won the election to become the first Black mayor of that city. From left, Herman J. Russell, Andrew Young, Richard Arrington, and Jesse Hill.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta–Fulton Public Library System, Harmon Perry Photograph Collection.

Herman J. Russell

Herman J. Russell

Herman J. Russell (left), founder of the Atlanta-based construction and real estate conglomerate H. J. Russell and Company, consults in 1983 with developer Robert Holder on plans for the Delta Air Lines building in College Park.

Herman J. Russell

Herman J. Russell

A nationally recognized entrepreneur and philanthropist, Herman J. Russell, an Atlanta native, founded H. J. Russell and Company, one of the nation's most profitable minority-owned business empires.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, Hosea Williams Photograph Collection.

BellSouth Telecommunications Building

BellSouth Telecommunications Building

The BellSouth Telecommunications Building, located at 675 West Peachtree Street in Atlanta, was built in 1980 by the Atlanta-based firm FABRAP, in conjunction with Skidmore Owings and Merrill of New York. It served as headquarters for both Southern Bell and BellSouth. In 2006 BellSouth was absorbed by AT&T, and today the building is part of the AT&T Midtown Center.

Courtesy of AT&T

Southern Bell Line Gang

Southern Bell Line Gang

Members of a floating line gang for Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company are pictured in 1928, probably near Covington. Southern Bell, a regional operating company of American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T), served Georgia from around 1879 until 1984.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives,
Virtual Georgia, #
VRG180.

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BellSouth Van

BellSouth Van

A BellSouth service van contains installation and repair equipment for such products as local and long-distance telephone service, Internet service, and satellite television. BellSouth offered these services in Georgia from 1984 until its merger with AT&T in 2006.

Courtesy of AT&T

Department of Labor

Department of Labor

The central office of the Georgia Department of Labor is pictured in 2008 at the corner of Piedmont Avenue and Andrew Young International Boulevard in Atlanta. The Department of Labor, created in 1937, provides workforce and vocational rehabilitation services, in addition to overseeing workplace safety programs and gathering labor and occupational statistics in Georgia.

Courtesy of Georgia Department of Labor

Mark Butler

Mark Butler

Mark Butler, the commissioner of the Georgia Department of Labor, was elected in 2010.

Courtesy of Georgia Department of Labor

Valdosta Career Center

Valdosta Career Center

The Valdosta Career Center, pictured circa 2008, is one of fifty-three career centers administered by the Georgia Department of Labor. These career centers, which aim to assist Georgia workers through training, educational resources, and financial support, replace traditional unemployment offices in the state.

Courtesy of Georgia Department of Labor

Athens Career Center

Athens Career Center

The Athens Career Center, pictured circa 2008, provides computers and other resources to job seekers in the Clarke County area. The center is administered by the Georgia Department of Labor.

Courtesy of Georgia Department of Labor

Michael L. Thurmond

Michael L. Thurmond

Michael L. Thurmond, the commissioner of the Georgia Department of Labor, was elected in 1998 and served until 2011.

Courtesy of Dekalb County

Atlanta Business Chronicle

Atlanta Business Chronicle

The Atlanta Business Chronicle, founded by Bob Gray and Mike Weingart in 1978, is a weekly journal that covers business and industry news in Atlanta. Today the publication is owned by American City Business Journals.

John D. Gray

John D. Gray

John D. Gray was the first major railroad contractor in the South and served as president of the Monroe Railroad in Georgia. During the Civil War he manufactured weaponry for the Confederacy.

Courtesy of Nancy Eubanks

Brumby Chair Company

Brumby Chair Company

Workers at the Brumby Chair Company in Marietta pause for their noon break in the summer of 1903. Under the leadership of Thomas Brumby, who helmed the company from 1888 to 1923, the Brumby Chair Company became one of the largest employers in Marietta and one of the largest chair factories in the Southeast.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
cob106.

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Brumby Delivery Truck

Brumby Delivery Truck

A Brumby Chair Company delivery truck is pictured, circa 1928. The Brumby Chair Company, based in Marietta, was incorporated in 1884 by brothers Jim and Thomas Brumby. The company, which the family continues to operate, is best known for its iconic rocking chair.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
cob299.

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Otis Brumby Sr.

Otis Brumby Sr.

Marietta leaders gather in the law office of Rip Blair (seated right) to honor Niles Trammel (seated left), circa 1940. Otis Brumby Sr. (standing far left) was the vice president of Brumby Chair Company. Also standing, from left: Stanton Read, Ed Massey, Jake Northcutt, Eugene McNeel Sr., unknown, Ryburn Clay, J. J. Daniell, Morgan McNeel.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
cob498.

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Carpet Machine

Carpet Machine

While the introduction of new machinery to textile factories in the 1970s resulted in workforce reductions across the state, the carpet industry of north Georgia weathered such changes, producing around 80 percent of the world's carpets in the twenty-first century.

Courtesy of Carpet and Rug Institute

Hosiery Mill

Hosiery Mill

A hosiery mill at Union Point, in Greene County, produces socks in 1941. Textile mills in Georgia began producing a variety of cotton products, including hosiery, carpet yarn, and twine, after 1900.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Young Mill Worker

Young Mill Worker

A young girl, pictured in 1909, works as a spinner in a Georgia cotton mill. Children were a signficant presence in the state's textile mills, accounting for 24 percent of the workforce in 1890.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

New Manchester Mill Ruins

New Manchester Mill Ruins

During the Civil War, Union forces burned the New Manchester Manufacturing Company on July 9, 1864. Today its ruins lie in the Sweetwater Creek State Park in Douglas County. The creek, mill ruins, and surrounding land were preserved by the Georgia Conservancy in the late 1960s.

Image from Travis Hudgons

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Seal of the Trustees

Seal of the Trustees

One face of the seal adopted by the Georgia Trustees features a silkworm, mulberry leaf, and cocoon, representing their hopes that the colonists would establish a thriving silk industry. The Latin motto Non sibi sed aliis  translates as "Not for self, but for others."

Mulberry Tree

Mulberry Tree

The white mulberry tree (Morus alba) was introduced to Georgia in 1734, when James Oglethorpe established the Trustee Garden in Savannah. Mulberry leaves are used to feed silkworms, which the colonists raised to make silk for shipment to England.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River

The Chattahoochee River flows through Columbus, one of the cities located along the fall line marking the boundary between the Piedmont and Coastal Plain geologic provinces. The hard rocks of the Piedmont form outcrops that create rapids and waterfalls along the fall line.

Photograph by andrewI04 

Whitehall Mill Store

Whitehall Mill Store

The Whitehall Mill Store (1850) served the employees of the Georgia Factory, which opened in Athens in 1829. In 1835 Whitehall, the state's first mill village, was established near the factory, on the banks of the North Oconee River. The two-story brick shotgun building features a romanesque facade topped by a two-level battlement.

Courtesy of Owens Library, School of Environment and Design, University of Georgia, John Linley Collection.

New Manchester Mill Ruins

New Manchester Mill Ruins

The ruins of the New Manchester Manufacturing Company, a textile mill burned during the Civil War, are located at Sweetwater Creek State Park, in Douglas County. The mill, one of the largest factories in Georgia, was destroyed in 1864 by Union general William T. Sherman's troops during their march to the sea.

Photograph by Evangelio Gonzalez

Eagle and Phenix Mills

Eagle and Phenix Mills

Eagle and Phenix Mills, built in Columbus around 1868, was eventually acquired by the W. C. Bradley Company, which was founded in 1895 by financier and philanthropist W. C. Bradley. In 2003 the company began a redevelopment project on the old mill site.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Engineering Record, #HAER GA,108-COLM,17-19.

Laurel Woolen Mill

Laurel Woolen Mill

Workers gather in front of the Laurel Woolen Mill in Roswell, circa 1890. The state's textile industry experienced strong growth during the last decades of the nineteenth century, with many northern investors choosing to locate mills in the South.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ful0525.

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Mill Houses

Mill Houses

Mill houses line a street in Dalton, circa 1930. The carpet and textile industries in the city began in the late nineteenth century with the tufted bedspreads of Catherine Evans Whitener and by the 1940s had developed into a mechanized industry in Whitfield County.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
wtf013a.

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Callaway Mills

Callaway Mills

Workers at the Callaway Mills in LaGrange operate weaving machinery, circa 1930. The mills were founded by Fuller Callaway Sr., who operated a number of profitable mills in LaGrange in the early twentieth century.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
trp252.

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Crown Cotton Mill

Crown Cotton Mill

Crown Cotton Mill No. 2, located on Chattanooga Avenue in Dalton, is pictured in the late 1920s. Established in 1884, Crown Cotton Mill brought much-needed economic activity to Whitfield County and by 1916 employed 1,000 workers.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
wtf014b.

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Cotton Billboard

Cotton Billboard

A billboard along a Georgia highway, pictured in 1939, endorses the continuation of the cotton industry in the state. In the years between the two world wars, the textile industry floundered, as numerous small mills closed and workers protested labor code violations.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Textile Strike

Textile Strike

Striking textile workers outside the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mill, 1934. Despite promises of reform made after the General Textile Strike of 1934, conditions in many mills did not improve until 1941, when the United States entered World War II.

Cotton Mill Worker

Cotton Mill Worker

A mill worker is pictured in October 1941 at the Mary-Leila Cotton Mill in Greensboro. Mills in Georgia were profitable during World War II (1941-45), producing such items as nylon and silk, as well as life rafts and uniforms for the war effort.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Thomaston Mills

Thomaston Mills

Employees of Thomaston Mills work in the plant during the late 1990s. Thomaston Mills was a major employer in Upson County from its beginning in 1899 until 2001, when the company declared bankruptcy.

Courtesy of Thomaston-Upson Archives

Banning Mill

Banning Mill

Banning Mill, initially known as Bowen's Mill, was founded along Snake Creek in Carroll County during the 1840s. Until its closure in 1971, Banning Mill was the oldest continuously operated mill in Georgia.

Photograph by Ed Schipul

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Callaway Mills Strike

Callaway Mills Strike

Mill workers went on strike at Callaway Mills in LaGrange during the General Textile Strike of ’34, along with approximately 44,000 others in Georgia.

Courtesy of Troup County Archives

Quick Start

Quick Start

A representative from Quick Start, a nationally recognized program offering free workforce training to new and exisiting companies in Georgia, makes a presentation to business leaders. Quick Start's services help to attract new investment and job creation in the state.

Courtesy of Quick Start

Georgia State Capitol

Georgia State Capitol

The state capitol building, completed in 1889, features a cornerstone, interior floor and steps, and many walls made of Georgia marble. Marble mined in the state was also used to construct 60 percent of the monuments and the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Georgia Marble Company

Georgia Marble Company

A gang saw at the first plant built by the Georgia Marble Company in Pickens County is pictured circa 1885. The company was founded in 1884 by Samuel Tate, who in the 1830s purchased large tracts of land containing marble in north Georgia.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck285-85.

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Tate and Foremen

Tate and Foremen

Colonel Sam Tate (second from left), the grandson of Georgia Marble Company founder Samuel Tate, poses with a group of foremen at the Pickens County plant, circa 1925. Colonel Sam served as president of the company from 1905 until his death in 1938.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck111-82.

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Georgia Marble Company

Georgia Marble Company

Colonel Sam Tate, the president of the Georgia Marble Company, oversees the production of a marble bench in the Pickens County plant, circa 1930. The marble industry in the state prospered during the early 1930s but suffered losses from 1933 through the rest of the decade.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck250-85.

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Ground Marble Products

Ground Marble Products

Sacks of ground or pulverized marble are produced at the Calcium Products Division of the Georgia Marble Company in Tate (Pickens County), circa 1950. The division was created in 1947 to sell "waste" marble, which is used as filler in paints and plastics. Ground marble products became the company's main product by the late 1980s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #pck253-85.

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Marble Slabs

Marble Slabs

Marble slabs used to make columns during reconstruction work on the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., are cut at the Georgia Marble Company in Pickens County, circa 1958.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck043-82.

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Marblehill Quarry

Marblehill Quarry

Workers for the Georgia Marble Company sit for a portrait during the 1920s at the Marblehill Quarry in Pickens County. Marble from Pickens County is reported to have been used in around 60 percent of the monuments in Washington, D.C.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
pck018-82.

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Terry College of Business

Terry College of Business

The Terry College of Business at the University of Georgia is housed in Brooks Hall (middle), located on the university's historic north campus. Terry College offers seven degree programs and is consistently ranked as one of the best business schools in the nation.

Courtesy of Terry College of Business, University of Georgia

Brooks Hall

Brooks Hall

Brooks Hall, designed by prominent Atlanta architect Neel Reid, was built in 1928 on the north campus of the University of Georgia in Athens. The building houses the Terry College of Business, which was founded in 1912 as the School of Commerce.

Image from Coxonian

C. Herman Terry

C. Herman Terry

C. Herman Terry, for whom the Terry College of Business is named, was an alumnus and benefactor of the school. In 1990 he and his wife, Mary Virginia Terry, donated $6 million, the largest cash gift in the college's history. The money was used to fund fellowships and scholarships and to endow faculty chairs.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Photographic Services

Executive Education Center

Executive Education Center

The Executive Education Center of the Terry College of Business is located in the Buckhead area of Atlanta. The center opened in 2005 and houses the school's Executive MBA program, in addition to facilitating interactions between Terry College and the Atlanta business community.

Courtesy of Terry College of Business, University of Georgia

Mills B. Lane Jr.

Mills B. Lane Jr.

Mills B. Lane Jr., a native of Savannah, was president of Citizens and Southern National Bank, based in Atlanta, from 1946 to 1973. During his tenure Lane financed several major projects in the city, including the Atlanta Stadium, and worked to establish peaceful race relations in both Atlanta and Savannah.

Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

An International League baseball game is played at the Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium in 1965, the same year in which the facility was completed. In addition to sporting events, the stadium was used for concerts and other large gatherings before it was destroyed in 1997 to make way for Turner Field (later Center Parc Stadium).

Crawford & Company Headquarters

Crawford & Company Headquarters

The headquarters for Crawford & Company, the world's largest independent insurance adjuster, are located in Atlanta. As of 2007 the company, which comprises the Broadspire, Global Property & Casualty, and Legal Settlement Administration divisions, operates 700 offices in 63 countries.

Courtesy of Crawford & Company

Jim Crawford

Jim Crawford

In 1941 Jim Crawford founded Crawford & Company, an independent insurance claims-adjusting firm, in Columbus. Five years later Crawford developed an internal training program, known today as Crawford University, which helped employees fulfull the company's mission of "Top Quality, Promptly."

Courtesy of Crawford & Company

Catastrophe Adjuster

Catastrophe Adjuster

A catastrophe adjuster for Crawford & Company, an Atlanta-based independent insurance adjusting company, examines damage caused by Hurricane Katrina along the Gulf Coast in 2005. Crawford introduced catastrophe services in the early 1970s.

Courtesy of Crawford & Company

Chateau Elan

Chateau Elan