Bleckley County

Bleckley
County, in central Georgia, was named for state chief justice Logan Bleckley. The 219-square-mile county was carved from Pulaski County by constitutional amendment in October 1912, when it became Georgia's 147th county. The area was originally inhabited by the Creek Indians.
The seat of Bleckley County, Cochran, originally known as Dykesboro, was incorporated in 1869 and named for Judge Arthur E. Cochran, president of the Macon and Brunswick (later Southern) Railroad. The current courthouse was built in 1914 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. Among the town's most memorable events are several tornadoes, the two most devastating occurring in 1929 and 1958. Six people were killed in the earlier storm, and sixteen people were injured in the latter. Newspaper reports of the 1958 tornado describe the funnel cloud picking up a church building and depositing it onto a city street.
Other towns in the county are Allentown and Empire. Allentown existed first as Cross Roads, then as Cool Spring, and later as Allen's Crossroads, named for one of the first postmasters, John Allen. The current name was taken in 1891, when the Macon, Dublin, and Savannah Railroad began running through the town. Empire has existed since 1886, when sawmill owners John Anderson and John W. Hightower named it. Like many other small towns of the era, Empire was located at the junction of two rail lines, the Macon and Brunswick division of the Southern Railroad and the Wrightsville and Tennille Railroad. The county also includes the community of Cary.
Descriptions of the county from its earliest days emphasize the amount of acreage devoted to pine forest. Where the forest was cleared, rich soil promoted an active agricultural economy with an emphasis on row crops (especially cotton, soybeans, and peanuts), fruit orchards (primarily peaches, apples, and pecans), and livestock.
Bleckley is home to Middle Georgia College, a two-year residential college in the University System of Georgia.
Points of interest in the county include the Ocmulgee River and Game Preserve, and Hillcrest (also known as Cedar Hall), an early-twentieth-century home in Cochran built in the Classical Revival style and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
According to the 2010 U.S. census, the population of the county is 13,063, an increase from the 2000 population of 11,666.
close

Loading

Further Reading
Susan R. Boatright and Douglas C. Bachtel, eds., Georgia County Guide (Athens: Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, University of Georgia, annual).

Daughters of the American Revolution, Hawkinsville Chapter, History of Pulaski and Bleckley Counties, Georgia, 1808-1956 (Macon, Ga.: n.p., 1957-58).

Antoinette F. Johnson and Linda Pettey Lander, eds., Our Heritage: Bicentennial, 1776-1976 (Cochran, Ga.: Cochran-Bleckley Bicentennial Committee, 1976).
Cite This Article
Cooksey, Elizabeth B. "Bleckley County." New Georgia Encyclopedia. 30 April 2013. Web. 21 December 2014.
From Our Home Page
Alliance Theatre

The Alliance Theatre, the largest regional theater in the Southeast, is recognized nationwide as a great critical and commercial success.

Read more...
Albany Movement

According to traditional accounts the Albany Movement began in fall 1961 and ended in summer 1962.

Read more...
Georgia Ornithological Society

The Georgia Ornithological Society (GOS) was founded in Atlanta on December 13, 1936, to promote interest in and appreciation of the i

Read more...
Gone With the Wind (Film)

Few films are so closely identified with a geographical region as Gone With the Wind is identified with Georgia and the Old South.

Read more...
Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries