Updated Recently

Christian Science

Christian Science

17 hours ago
Alice Walker

Alice Walker

22 hours ago
Etowah Mounds

Etowah Mounds

2 days ago
Baptists Today

Baptists Today

4 days ago

Explore Georgia’s rich music history

From blues and soul to classical and country—our Spotify playlists feature 130+ songs written and performed by Georgians.

Tugaloo Dam

Tugaloo Dam

The Tugaloo Dam, located on the Tugaloo River in northeast Georgia, is one of many impoundments that occur within the Savannah River basin. Such dams provide hydroelectric power and water reserves to municipal areas, but they also threaten the health of the watershed's ecosystem.

Photograph by Joel Shiver

Ogeechee River

Ogeechee River

The Ogeechee River is one of five rivers that form a collective river basin in Georgia's Coastal Plain. The tea-colored water of these rivers, which are known as blackwater rivers, is caused by high concentrations of dissolved organic material.

Image from Jet Lowe

Georgia River Basins

Georgia River Basins

Fourteen river basins, or watersheds, lie within Georgia's borders. The Altamaha, Ocmulgee, Oconee, Ogeechee, Satilla, Savannah, and St. Marys basins drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The Chattahoochee, Coosa, Flint, Ochlockonee, Suwanee, Tallapoosa, and Tennessee basins drain into the Gulf of Mexico.

Courtesy of Georgia Water Coalition

Ogeechee River Watershed

Ogeechee River Watershed

The Ogeechee River, one of only forty-two free-flowing rivers in the United States longer than 200 kilometers, drains from the eastern part of Georgia to the Atlantic Ocean.

Courtesy of Georgia Rivers LMER

Savannah River

Savannah River

The Savannah River, which forms the boundary between Georgia and South Carolina, begins at Lake Hartwell in northeast Georgia and flows south to Savannah, where it empties into the Atlantic Ocean.

Image from jpellgen (@1179_jp)

View on source site

Savannah River Watershed

Savannah River Watershed

The Savannah River, which forms the border between Georgia and South Carolina, drains into the Atlantic Ocean. It begins at the confluence of the Seneca and Tugaloo rivers in northeast Georgia.

Courtesy of Georgia Rivers LMER

Tallapoosa River

Tallapoosa River

The Tallapoosa River (pictured in Elmore County, Alabama) originates in Georgia's Paulding County, west of Atlanta. The river covers 720 square miles in Georgia before entering Alabama, where its remaining 3,960 square miles lie.

Image from cmh2315fl

View on source site

Coosa River

Coosa River

The Coosa River, formed by the confluence of the Etowah and Oostanaula rivers in Rome, empties into the Gulf of Mexico. The river supports more than 147 species of fish and contains the world's largest diversity of freshwater snails and mussels.

Image from CarolinePope22

Upper Tennessee River Basin

Upper Tennessee River Basin

The Tennessee River basin is part of the Coosa and Tallapoosa river basins in north Georgia. The Tennessee River basin covers portions of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia, and joins with the Ohio River, a tributary of the Mississippi River. The Mississippi River drains into the Gulf of Mexico.

Courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

Conasauga Logperch

Conasauga Logperch

The Conasauga logperch (Percina jenkinsi) is an endangered species found in the Coosa, Tallapoosa, and Tennessee rivers. The logperch grows to approximately six inches in length.

Courtesy of USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station

Flint River

Flint River

The Flint River, which begins in Georgia's Piedmont region, is part of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basin, which drains portions of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. It flows to the Chattahoochee River in southwest Georgia.

Photograph from Doug Bradley

Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River

The Chattahoochee River, part of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basin, is one of the nation's most endangered rivers. In addition to providing habitat for birds, mammals, and reptiles, the river supports six endangered or threatened mussel species. The river begins in the Blue Ridge Mountains and flows to southwest Georgia.

Photograph by Dianne Frost

Amber Darter

Amber Darter

The amber darter (Percina antesella), native to the Coosa, Tallapoosa, and Tennessee rivers, has been federally listed as an endangered species since 1985.

Photograph by Dick Biggins, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

West Point Lake

West Point Lake

A popular boating destination, West Point Lake in Troup County is formed by an impoundment of the Chattahoochee River. The lake covers 25,900 acres in area and has a shoreline of 525 miles.

Courtesy of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Oconee River

Oconee River

The Oconee River begins in the Appalachian Mountains and joins with the Ocmulgee River to form the Altamaha River in Georgia's Upper Coastal Plain. The cities of Athens, Milledgeville, and Dublin are located along the Oconee.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Altamaha River Watershed

Altamaha River Watershed

The Altamaha River, formed by the convergence of the Oconee and Ocmulgee rivers, drains into the Atlantic Ocean at Darien. The Altamaha watershed is the largest in Georgia and the third largest in the United States to drain into the Atlantic.

Courtesy of Georgia Rivers LMER

Altamaha River

Altamaha River

The Altamaha River watershed provides habitat for numerous nesting and migratory birds, as well as for more than 100 rare and endangered aquatic species.

Image from Electronic Collection of Georgia Birds

View on source site

St. Marys River Watershed

St. Marys River Watershed

The St. Marys River, which forms the boundary between Georgia and Florida, drains to the Atlantic Ocean.

Courtesy of Georgia Rivers LMER

Ogeechee River Tributary

Ogeechee River Tributary

A third-order tributary of the Ogeechee River, a blackwater river that begins in Greene County, flows through a densely forested area in the Coastal Plain.

Courtesy of J. L. Meyer

Satilla River Watershed

Satilla River Watershed

The Satilla River, one of five blackwater rivers in Georgia, begins in Ben Hill County and lies entirely within the Coastal Plain. It drains to the Atlantic Ocean. Pollution levels are very low in the Satilla, which is bordered by cypress and black gum forests.

Courtesy of Georgia Rivers LMER

Savannah Port

Savannah Port

One of the busiest ports on the East Coast of the United States, Savannah handles approximately 80 percent of the shipborne cargo entering Georgia.

Photograph by Ron Cogswell 

Savannah River

Savannah River

The Savannah River, which originates in Hart County at the confluence of the Seneca and Tugaloo rivers, flows for 313 miles to the Atlantic Ocean. The river has played in important role in the state's human history and forms the basis for one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Diversion Dam

Diversion Dam

A diversion dam on the Savannah River pushes water to the headgate and locks of the Savannah-Ogeechee-Altamaha Canal, in Augusta. Along its route from the Piedmont to the Atlantic Ocean, the Savannah River is diverted for various purposes, including navigation, the generation of electricity, and water for human consumption.

Image from Stacie Wells

View on source site

Russell Dam

Russell Dam

The Savannah River is impounded along its upper stretch to form Lake Richard B. Russell at the Russell Dam. Other reservoirs along the upper Savannah are Lake Hartwell and Clarks Hill Lake.

Photograph by Darby Carl Sanders

False Rue Anemone

False Rue Anemone

False rue anemone is one of the more than seventy-five rare plant species native to the Savannah River basin. The anemone, along with bottle-brush buckeye and relict trillium, is found along river bluffs near Augusta.

Courtesy of Joseph O'Brien, USDA Forest Service, www.forestryimages.org

Savannah Riverfront

Savannah Riverfront

The Savannah River flows past downtown Savannah. The river has played an integral role in the development of human settlements in Georgia, from the Paleoindian period to the present day.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Cotton Shipping

Cotton Shipping

Workers load cotton bales onto a ship docked on the Savannah River at Savannah, circa 1880. The river served as an important shipping channel throughout the nineteenth century and into the early twentieth.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ctm345-86.

View on partner site

Chattooga River

Chattooga River

The fifty-mile Chattooga River begins in North Carolina and flows through South Carolina and Georgia. One of the few rivers to qualify for the national designation of a Wild and Scenic River, the Chattooga is protected from development and motorized vehicles along its banks by a one-fourth-mile-wide corridor on each side.

Photograph by Brenda Wiley

Chattooga River

Chattooga River

The Chattooga Rivers flows through the Ellicott Rock Wilderness Area, located on the shared borders of Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. The forests adjacent to the river are among the most biologically diverse in the nation.

Photograph by Joel Shiver

Chattooga Town Site

Chattooga Town Site

A 1993 aerial view shows the site of Chattooga Town, a Cherokee settlement along the Chattooga River during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. An English census conducted in 1721 lists about ninety people in the town, which included numerous structures.

Photograph by SkyShots. Courtesy of Frank H. McClung Museum, University of Tennessee

Forest Removal

Forest Removal

The effects of the timber industry are visible in this photograph taken from the Chattooga River, at the mouth of the Tallulah River. During the late nineteenth century, extensive logging in southern forests threatened the fragile ecosystem of the Chattooga River watershed.

Courtesy of Mars Hill College, Appalachian Room Archives, Gennett Collection.

Chattooga Paddlers

Chattooga Paddlers

Paddlers travel down the Chattooga River through Rabun County. The river, designated a Wild and Scenic River by the federal government in 1968, is a popular destination for rafters, canoers, and kayakers.

The Flint River

The Flint River

The Flint River, named for the stone along much of its shore, supports many varieties of local wildlife. Originating near Atlanta, the river flows south for more than 200 miles, feeding two power-producing lakes along the way, as well as providing farmers with water for crop irrigation.

Photograph by J. S. Clark

Sprewell Bluff State Park

Sprewell Bluff State Park

The Flint River flows through Sprewell Bluff State Park in Upson County. The bluff ecosytem supports an unusual mixture of plants and trees that are generally found in either the Piedmont or mountainous regions of the state.

Halloween Darter

Halloween Darter

In the early 1990s, researchers at the University of Georgia's Institute of Ecology (later Odum School of Ecology) discovered the Halloween darter (Percina crypta), which is unique to the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint system.

Photograph by Bud Freeman

Flint River Foods

Flint River Foods

Flint River Foods in Montezuma processes vegetables for packaging. The company is located in the Flint River watershed, which irrigates the surrounding land for the cultivation of peanuts, soybeans, vegetables, and wheat.

Flint River Shore

Flint River Shore

Fishing is a popular activity on the Flint River, which flows for more than 200 miles from the Piedmont region to the Chattahoochee River in southwest Georgia. Fishermen prize the river's shoal bass, a fish unique to the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system.

Photograph from Wikimedia

Flint River Flood of 1925

Flint River Flood of 1925

Two men attempt to rescue a cow in high water near Albany during the Flint River flood of 1925. The Flint River has overrun its banks several times in Albany's history; the most severe flood occurred in the summer of 1994, when the river crested in the city at more than forty-three feet.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
dgh246-86.

View on partner site

Flint RiverQuarium Blue Hole

Flint RiverQuarium Blue Hole

Fish swim in the constructed "blue hole" at the Flint RiverQuarium, which opened in Albany in 2004. The 22-foot-deep tank is modeled on the natural blue holes, or springs rising from underground caverns, that occur along the Flint River in southwest Georgia.

Courtesy of Flint RiverQuarium

Flint River Flood in Montezuma

Flint River Flood in Montezuma

In 1994, due to tropical storm Alberto, the Flint River overflowed its banks and flooded Montezuma. The water rose as high as the rooftops, and whole buildings were engulfed in the flood.

Photograph from 161st Military History Detachment

Franklin Tree Flower

Franklin Tree Flower

The Franklin tree or lost camellia (Franklinia alatamaha), once native only to Georgia, was discovered along the banks of the Altamaha River in the mid-eighteenth century and was last recorded in the wild by nurseryman and plant collector in 1803. All known specimens today are in cultivation.

Photograph from Francine Riez, Wikimedia

Altamaha River

Altamaha River

The riparian zone along the sides of the Altamaha River is thick with vegetation. The plants in the riparian zone are diverse. Common trees include river birch, laurel oak, southern red oak, post oak, willow, red maple, sycamore, locust, hickory, red cedar, cypress, and sweet gum.

Image from Bubba73 (Jud McCranie)

Altamaha River

Altamaha River

The Altamaha River watershed is the second largest (14,500 sqare miles) in the eastern United States. It drains more than one quarter of Georgia's land surface, including half of Atlanta and all of Macon. With more than 100,000 gallons of water expelled into the Atlantic Ocean every second, the Altamaha is "Georgia's Mightiest River."

Photograph by Orhan Gunduz, Georgia Institute of Technology

Altamaha River, Darien

Altamaha River, Darien

Darien is a coastal tidewater town about sixty miles south of Savannah, located at the mouth of the Altamaha River. The port town's origins can be traced to the earliest years of colonial Georgia.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Altamaha River Wildlife

Altamaha River Wildlife

The Altamaha River Delta in Glynn and McIntosh counties is a major reserve for migratory and wintering birds. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources estimates this area supports at least 55,000 species of seabirds and shorebirds annually.

Image from Electronic Collection of Georgia Birds

View on source site

Altamaha River Cypress

Altamaha River Cypress

With some of the South's last remaining hardwood bottomlands and cypress swamps (including the largest known groves of virgin tidewater cypress), the Altamaha River promises to be a conservation priority for Georgia environmental groups over the next several decades.

River Frog

River Frog

Indigenous to the southeastern United States, the river frog (Rana hecksheri), which is identified by light spots on the lips, can be spotted along the Altamaha River.

Photograph by James Harding, Michigan State University

Ocmulgee River

Ocmulgee River

The Ocmulgee River runs from Macon just south of Lumber City before converging with the Oconee to form the Altamaha River.

Photograph by Melinda S. Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Ocmulgee River

Ocmulgee River

The Ocmulgee River flows right through Macon. In fact, Macon is the dividing line between two very different Ocmulgees. To the north of Macon, the river is rocky. Below Macon, the river turns sandy and slowly meanders southward.

Image from Lee Coursey

View on source site

Ocmulgee National Monument

Ocmulgee National Monument

The chiefdom of Ichisi was located between modern Macon and Perry on the Ocmulgee River. The capital town was probably located at the present-day Lamar archaeological site, a part of Ocmulgee National Monument.

Mississippian Platform Mound

Mississippian Platform Mound

A Mississippian mound, such as those found in settlements along the Chattahoochee River from A.D. 800-1600, is depicted in this drawing by Cheryl Mann Hardin. Such mounds were used in various ways, including as platforms for buildings.

Courtesy of Historic Chattahoochee Commission

Chattahoochee Valley Archaeological Sites

Chattahoochee Valley Archaeological Sites

Archaeological evidence indicates that humans have lived along the banks of the Chattahoochee River for a very long time.

From Flowing through Time: A History of the Lower Chattahoochee River, by L. Willoughby

Queen City

Queen City

The riverboat Queen City, pictured loaded with turpentine barrels, was a fixture on the Chattahoochee River in the nineteenth century.

From Flowing through Time: A History of the Lower Chattahoochee River, by L. Willoughby

Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River

Dams at different points along the Chattahoochee River help maintain river water levels and provide hydroelectric power.

Courtesy of Jim Kundell, Carl Vinson Institute of Government, University of Georgia

Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River

Barges, flatboats, and steamboats carried goods and passengers along the Chattahoochee River during the nineteenth century. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, however, the river is valued more as a source of drinking water and recreation than as a transportation artery.

Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River

The Chattahoochee River flows through Columbus, one of the cities located along the fall line marking the boundary between the Piedmont and Coastal Plain geologic provinces. The hard rocks of the Piedmont form outcrops that create rapids and waterfalls along the fall line.

Photograph by andrewI04 

Chattahoochee River Headwaters

Chattahoochee River Headwaters

This spring near Jacks Knob Trail in Union County is the likely source of the Chattahoochee River. Georgia is a headwaters state—many rivers begin in the state, but none within its borders has its origins elsewhere.

Courtesy of Edwin L. Jackson

High Falls State Park

High Falls State Park

High Falls State Park, near Jackson in Butts County, is a popular destination along the Towaliga River for camping and boating. The town of High Falls, established in the early 1800s, became a ghost town during the 1880s, when the railroads gained prominence over waterways for commercial transportation.

Geographic Regions of Georgia

Geographic Regions of Georgia

Georgia encompasses parts of five distinct geographic regions: the Appalachian Plateau, the Valley and Ridge, the Blue Ridge, the Piedmont, and the Coastal Plain.

Courtesy of Pamela J. W. Gore

Lichens and Mosses on Granite Outcrop

Lichens and Mosses on Granite Outcrop

Lichens and mosses grow on a granite outcrop at Panola Mountain State Park in Stockbridge. As resurrection plants, lichens and mosses are able to resume photosynthesis after a drought, making them ideally suited to the desert-like conditions on the outcrops.

Photograph by Melinda Smith Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Great Egret

Great Egret

A great egret perches on a branch in the Okefenokee Swamp.

Photograph by Siddharth Sharma

Columbus Fall Line

Columbus Fall Line

One end of Georgia's fall line, which marks the boundary between the hard rocks of the Piedmont geologic province and the softer rocks of the Coastal Plain, is located in Columbus. Marked by waterfalls and rapids, the fall line stretches across the state to Augusta.

Photograph by Pamela J. W. Gore

Amicalola Falls

Amicalola Falls

Amicalola Falls in Dawson County is one of Georgia's most popular attractions.

Photograph by Darren Duke

High Falls State Park

High Falls State Park

Falls also exist in central Georgia, where the Coastal Plain gives rise to the Piedmont Plateau. The most notable of these is High Falls at High Falls State Park, near Jackson in Butts County.

Image from gary riley

View on source site

Helen Waterfall

Helen Waterfall

A waterfall flows near Helen, a tourist destination located at the headwaters of the Chattahoochee River, in the mountains of northeast Georgia. More waterfalls occur in this region of the state than any other because of abrupt elevation changes.

Anna Ruby Falls

Anna Ruby Falls

Anna Ruby Falls, in the heart of the Chattahoochee National Forest, marks the junction of Curtis and York creeks. Curtis Creek drops 153 feet and York Creek 50 feet to form the twin falls known as Anna Ruby Falls.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Geoff L. Johnson.

Tempesta Falls

Tempesta Falls

Tempesta Falls is located in northeast Georgia's Tallulah Gorge State Park, near the Rabun and Habersham county line. Tempesta, one of a series of four main cataracts that make up Tallulah, today only roars to life on selected weekends in the spring and autumn.

Photograph by Mark Morrison

Hiawassee Falls

Hiawassee Falls

Many of Georgia's waterfalls are located in the northern part of the state. These Hiawassee falls are in upper northeast Georgia, in Towns County.