Updated Recently

Christian Science

Christian Science

3 days ago
Alice Walker

Alice Walker

3 days ago
Etowah Mounds

Etowah Mounds

5 days ago
Baptists Today

Baptists Today

6 days ago

Explore Georgia’s rich music history

From blues and soul to classical and country—our Spotify playlists feature 130+ songs written and performed by Georgians.

David Emanuel Twiggs

David Emanuel Twiggs

David Emanuel Twiggs, a U.S. Army general, surrendered U.S. forces to Confederate authorities in Texas when that state seceded from the Union in 1861. He was the son of prominent Revolutionary War general John Twiggs and nephew of Georgia governor David Emanuel.

Infantry: Continental Army, 1779-1783

Infantry: Continental Army, 1779-1783

Henry Alexander's lithograph Infantry: Continental Army, 1779-1783 depicts the uniforms and weapons used by the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Nathanael Greene

Nathanael Greene

Nathanael Greene was one of the most respected generals of the Revolutionary War and a talented military strategist. As commander of the Southern Department of the Continental army, his leadership was the catalyst that turned the tide toward American victory in Georgia.

Courtesy of Independence National Historical Park

Sheftall Sheftall

Sheftall Sheftall

Sheftall Sheftall was the eldest son of Mordecai Sheftall, a successful Savannah merchant, shipper, and statesman. In 1777, during the Revolutionary War, Mordecai became a colonel, and he named Sheftall as his assistant. The following year both men were taken as prisoners by the British and held in the Caribbean for two years before being released.

Bushnell’s Submarine

Bushnell’s Submarine

Connecticut native and, later, Georgia resident David Bushnell invented the submarine. He created the first prototype of a manned submarine, called the "Turtle," in the 1770s. His design was used in the Revolutionary War against the British.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Count Casimir Pulaski

Count Casimir Pulaski

Count Casimir Pulaski was one of Georgia's most notable military heroes during the Revolutionary War. A Polish nobleman, Pulaski was killed while leading an unsuccessful charge against the British during the 1779 Siege of Savannah.

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society, Foltz Photography Studio (Savannah, Ga.), photographs, 1899-1960, #1360-25-13-14.

View on partner site

Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski, situated on Cockspur Island at the mouth of the Savannah River, was built in the 1830s and 1840s to defend Savannah. During the Civil War, Union forces captured the fort on April 11, 1862, and controlled it for the remainder of the war.

Photograph by Brooke Novak

Siege of Savannah

Siege of Savannah

This drawing by a British officer details the failed attempt by American and French forces to recapture Savannah from British troops on October 9, 1779.

Casimir Pulaski Stamp

Casimir Pulaski Stamp

General Casimir Pulaski, featured on this 1931 U.S. postage stamp, joined American forces in the Revolutionary War. Fort Pulaski, near the mouth of the Savannah River, bears his name.

Courtesy of the Smithsonian National Postal Museum

Nathanael Greene

Nathanael Greene

Although Greene himself never fought in Georgia, he took a personal interest in saving the vulnerable colony, sending his best generals for its protection and closely overseeing the colony's affairs.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Small Print Collection, #
spc18-025.

View on partner site

Greene Monument

Greene Monument

A monument to Revolutionary War general Nathanael Greene stands in Johnson Square, in Savannah.

Image from sfgamchick

View on source site

Nathanael Greene Reinterment

Nathanael Greene Reinterment

Soldiers from Fort Screven stand in formation during the 1902 reinterment of Revolutionary War general Nathanael Greene in Savannah's Johnson Square.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ctm257.

View on partner site

Sixtieth Regiment of Foot

Sixtieth Regiment of Foot

Three companies of the British Sixtieth Regiment of Foot were sent to the Georgia colony in 1763 by King George III to strengthen the defense of colonial garrisons against attack by the French and Spanish.

Courtesy of The Company of Military Historians

Lachlan McIntosh

Lachlan McIntosh

Lachlan McIntosh distinguished himself in a career that evolved over three critical eras in the state's early history, from the colonial period to the Revolutionary War to statehood.