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American Burying Beetle

American Burying Beetle

The American burying beetle, Nicrophorus americanus, is an endangered species and is no longer found in Georgia. Beetles, order Coleoptera, are the largest group of insects, and thousands of species can be found in Georgia.

Photograph by the Frost Museum

European Honeybees

European Honeybees

European honeybees are not native to Georgia, but records show they arrived in the state by 1743. They were named the state insect in 1975. In addition to creating honey, honeybees pollinate several crops, including blueberries, apples, melons, and gourds.

Photograph by Waugsberg

Bombyx mori

Bombyx mori

An adult silkmoth, Bombyx mori. This species's caterpillar, the mulberry silkworm, has produced silk textiles for millennia. Eighteenth-century Georgia colonists tried and failed to establish a silk industry in Savannah.

Photograph by Nikita

Fire Ant

Fire Ant

Solenopsis invicta are an invasive ant species from South America. The species has interbred with native ants to create hybrid ant species that threaten soybean production. All ants are eusocial, which means they live in strict social hiearchies.

Varroa Mite

Varroa Mite

Researchers have attributed recent declines in apiary honeybee populations to parasitic varroa mites, pictured between the bee's wings above. Varroa mites suck drone and developing brood blood, weakening individuals. An untreated varroa infestation may kill colonies.

Photograph by the U.S. Department of Agriculture

Golden Garden Spider

Golden Garden Spider

The golden garden spider, Argiope aurantia, is a member of the orb-web family. Here, an individual uses its spinnerets, located on its abdomen, to trap prey. Spiders are exclusively carnivorous, though the golden garden spider is no danger to humans.

Photograph by Tom McC

Widow Spider

Widow Spider

Widow spiders produce cobwebs and seclude themselves in dark, isolated areas. They have a painful bite, which requires medical attention, but they are rarely fatal.

Photograph by Charaj

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

The eastern tiger swallowtail, Papilo glaucus, is the state butterfly of Georgia. It's common across the eastern United States.

Courtesy of Loy Xingwen

Jim Fowler

Jim Fowler

Conservationist Jim Fowler, a Georgia native, holds a peregrine falcon at the National Bison Range near Missoula, Montana, in 1998. Fowler cohosted the television series Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom for more than twenty years and made frequent appearances on the Today show and on the Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.

Jim Fowler

Jim Fowler

Jim Fowler (center), a conservationist and environmental educator, shows a student in Rockdale County how to feed a baby black-spotted leopard in 2003. A native of Dougherty County, Fowler was the longtime cohost of the television series Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom.

The Parks at Chehaw

The Parks at Chehaw

Visitors feed a rhino in the Parks at Chehaw in Albany. The zoo was designed by Dougherty County native Jim Fowler, the longtime cohost of Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom. The Chehaw zoo and Zoo Atlanta are the only two accredited zoos in the state.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Yellow Breasted Finch

Yellow Breasted Finch

John Abbot painted his Yellow Breasted Finch (watercolor on paper, 11 1/8" x 8 3/4") in 1790, fifteen years after moving from Virginia to Georgia. A native of England, Abbot traveled to America in 1773 and spent the remainder of his life collecting and drawing specimens of New World birds, insects, and butterflies.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Grebe, Didapper, or Water Witch

Grebe, Didapper, or Water Witch

Painter John Abbot's Grebe, Didapper, or Water Witch (watercolor on paper, 11 1/8" x 8 3/4") is housed at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

John Abbot Plaque

John Abbot Plaque

This bronze plaque depicting the naturalist and illustrator John Abbot graces a monument erected in 1957 by the Georgia Historical Society and the Georgia Historical Commission in Bulloch County. Abbot, a British native, collected and drew numerous specimens of birds, insects, butterflies, and moths during his nearly sixty-five years in Georgia.

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society, Georgia Historical Society Collection of Photographs, 1870-1960, #1361PH-24-01-4588.

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La Belle Dame d’Amerique

La Belle Dame d’Amerique

This watercolor of a butterfly, today identified as the American Painted Lady, is one of many images depicting butterflies and moths by John Abbot, a British collector and illustrator who lived and worked in Georgia from 1775 until around 1840.

From The Natural History of the Rarer Lepidopterous Insects of Georgia, by J. Abbot

Little Horn Owl or Screech Owl

Little Horn Owl or Screech Owl

John Abbot, a painter and naturalist, created Little Horn Owl or Screech Owl (watercolor on paper, 11 1/8" x 8 3/4") in 1790. From 1775 until 1818 Abbot lived and worked in present-day Burke County, sending specimens and illustrations of New World species to collectors in his homeland of England.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Eliza Frances Andrews

Eliza Frances Andrews

Eliza Frances Andrews (pictured ca. 1879) was a writer of journals, novels, newspaper reports, botany articles and textbooks, and editorials. Her published diary, War-Time Journal of a Georgia Girl, 1864-1865, is one of the most compelling first-person accounts of the Civil War home front.

Courtesy of University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Lupton Library Special Collections

Eliza Frances Andrews

Eliza Frances Andrews

Image of Eliza Frances Andrews in the War-Time Journal of a Georgia Girl, 1864-1865, one of the most compelling first-person accounts of the Civil War (1861-65) home front, published in 1908. Eliza Frances Andrews was a writer, newspaper reporter, editor, columnist, social critic, scientist, and educator. By the time of her death in 1931 in Rome, Georgia, Andrews had written three novels, more than a dozen scientific articles on botany, two internationally recognized botany textbooks, and dozens of articles, commentaries, and reports on topics ranging from politics to environmental issues.

Image from The War Time Journal of a Georgia Girl (1908)

Red Clay Road

Red Clay Road

A dirt road in rural Madison County showcases Georgia's famous red clay, found throughout the state's Piedmont. The clay's composition of silicon, aluminum, and iron oxides is called saprolite.

Photograph from Elizabeth Prata

Fallow Field

Fallow Field

A bare fallow field, composed of sandy soil and clay subsoil, in Vienna, Georgia. Soil, which is composed of minerals, organic material, water, and air, is generally less than a meter in depth and forms through the weathering of the earth's surface.

Image from Lee Coursey

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Decomposition Research

Decomposition Research

Researchers at the University of Georgia examine the decomposition of corn at the Horseshoe Bend Ecosystem Research Site in Athens. The decomposition process is integral to the formation of soil and the cycling of nutrients within an ecosystem.

Photograph by David C. Coleman

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

The painted lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui) is a migratory species of butterfly that spends part of its life cycle in Georgia.

Image from Vanessa Cardui

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Tiger Swallowtail

Tiger Swallowtail

The state legislature named the tiger swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) as the official butterfly of Georgia in 1988. The butterfly species is one of several hundred found in the state.

Image from Peter Miller

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Grey Hairstreak

Grey Hairstreak

The knobby ends of its antennae stalk, as well as the upright position of its wings, identify the grey hairstreak (Strymon melinus) as a butterfly, rather than a moth.

Image from mwms1916

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Butterfly Weed

Butterfly Weed

Butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) is one of the best plants for attracting butterflies in Georgia and one of only several species eaten by caterpillars. Caterpillars feed only on the type of plant upon which they hatch, and they can eat several times their weight in food on a single day.

Image from Philip Bouchard

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Swallowtail Caterpillar

Swallowtail Caterpillar

An eastern black swallowtail caterpillar (Papilio polyxenes) feeds on a dill plant. A butterfly or moth caterpillar typically feeds for two to four weeks before beginning its metamorphosis into a butterfly by spinning a silk cocoon.

Photograph by Paul Thomas

Tiger Swallowtails

Tiger Swallowtails

Tiger swallowtails (Papilio glaucus) sip from a stream. Georgia's state butterfly, the tiger swallowtail produces two "broods" of caterpillars each season, one in May and the other in July or August.

Image from Vicki DeLoach

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Upright Verbena

Upright Verbena

Upright verbena (Verbena bonairiensis) is one of the best plants for attracting butterflies in Georgia. The loss of important forage plants, often due to the use of herbicides in agriculture, poses a threat to the survival of many species of butterfly in the state.

Image from Linda De Volder

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Loggerhead Sea Turtle

Loggerhead Sea Turtle

The threatened loggerhead sea turtle lives in the waters off Georgia and nests on the state's beaches.

Image from Florida Fish and Wildlife

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Sea Turtle Hatchling

Sea Turtle Hatchling

Following the long crawl from its nest, a loggerhead sea turtle hatchling finds its way into the bubbling surf on the north beach of Ossabaw Island.

Sea Turtle

Sea Turtle

A sea turtle hatchling makes its way to the ocean on Blackbeard Island.

Courtesy of U.S Fish and Wildlife Service

Turtle Exclusion Device

Turtle Exclusion Device

Turtle exclusion devices (TEDs) allow marine turtles to escape fishing and shrimping nets while retaining most of the catch.

Courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce

Painted Bunting

Painted Bunting

As a result of changes in the landscape, the number of painted buntings (Passerina ciris), the most colorful songbirds in the state, declined by more than 50 percent in Georgia from 1966 to 2000.

Photograph by Amanda Heffron Morgan

Osprey

Osprey

An osprey (Pandion haliaetus) soars in the sky.

Image from Colby Stopa

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Peregrine Falcon

Peregrine Falcon

Peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus), the world's fastest birds, reach speeds of up to 200 miles per hour as they dive for prey. Although use of the pesticide DDT during the mid-twentieth century drove the species to extinction in the eastern United States, peregrine falcons have recovered and often choose to nest in large urban areas like Atlanta.

Courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Male Northern Bobwhite

Male Northern Bobwhite

The northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus), also known as the bobwhite quail, is Georgia's state gamebird and is featured on one of Georgia's wildlife license plates.

Image from William L. Farr

Female House Finch

Female House Finch

The colorful and musical house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) has taken over habitat once used by the house sparrow. From 1980 to 2000 the house finch population exploded in Georgia's suburbs and towns.

Image from Rhododendrites

Waterbird Nesting Colony

Waterbird Nesting Colony

Large colonies of waterbird nesting colonies, such as this one in south Georgia, form in the spring when high water levels provide protection from predators.

Photograph by J. Michael Meyers

Thomas Burleigh

Thomas Burleigh

Thomas Burleigh, recognized as the state's most important ornithologist, is the author of Georgia Birds (1958), the first comprehensive state bird book.

Courtesy of Warnell School of Forest Resources, University of Georgia

Swamp Habitat

Swamp Habitat

The Okefenokee Swamp, which floods about 400,000 acres in south Georgia, is an important wetland bird habitat. About 232 different birds can be found in the swamp, which provides habitat for 64 nesting species.

Image from George Gentry - US Fish and Wildlife Service

Great Egret

Great Egret

The interior maritime forest of Cumberland Island is studded with saltwater coves, freshwater ponds, and inland swamps, all providing shelter for such long-legged wading birds as the great egret.

Wood Storks

Wood Storks

Endangered wood storks in Harris Neck Wildlife Refuge. The refuge, located in Liberty County, is one of seven refuges administered by the Savannah Coastal Refuges Complex. The refuge's 2,762 acres consist of saltwater marsh, grassland, mixed deciduous woods, and cropland, which serve as home to many different bird species.

Image from Evangelio Gonzalez

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Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) has recovered from losses caused by pesticides, especially DDT. No nests were found in Georgia in 1979, but by 2004 eagles had nested in more than eighty locations in the state.

Courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Osprey Nest

Osprey Nest

An osprey (also known as "fish hawk") nest. In the 1950s many ospreys died from eggshell thinning caused by chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides (such as DDT). Nesting ospreys in the Okefenokee Swamp recovered after the pesticides were banned from use in the United States.

Photograph by J. Michael Meyers

Male House Finch

Male House Finch

The colorful and musical house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) has taken over habitat once used by the house sparrow. From 1980 to 2000 the house finch population exploded in Georgia's suburbs and towns.

Image from Rick from Alabama

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Grand Bay Wetland Education Center

Grand Bay Wetland Education Center

Wood ducks fly over the Grand Bay Wildlife Management Area in Lowndes County, which includes the 18,000-acre Grand Bay/Banks Lake ecosystem.

Photograph by Julius F. Ariail Jr.

Bobwhite Quail

Bobwhite Quail

The bobwhite quail, pictured here on a 1987 first-class stamp, is Georgia's official state game bird. 

Courtesy of Smithsonian National Postal Museum 

Bobcat

Bobcat

Bobcats are one of the more than ninety species of mammals that inhabit Georgia. Bobcats generally feed on such smaller mammals as rats, mice, and shrews.

Photograph by Melinda Smith Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

River Otter

River Otter

As a result of habitat loss and the overhunting of fur, river otters were extinct in Georgia by the mid-twentieth century. After being successfully reintroduced, however, otters now thrive throughout the state.

Photograph by Melinda Smith Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Right Whales, Mother and Calf

Right Whales, Mother and Calf

The only known calving grounds for the right whale are off the coast of Georgia and north Florida. In the late fall the pregnant females migrate to the relatively calm, cool, and predator-free waters, where, from December to April, calving occurs.

Image from FWC Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

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Gray Fox

Gray Fox

Small terrestrial carnivores, including gray foxes, opossums, and raccoons, are indigenous to the Okefenokee Swamp.

Gray Bat

Gray Bat

Sixteen species of bats, including gray bats (Myotis grisescens), use Georgia's caves as crucual hibernation or migration habitats. As many as 15,000 gray bats, an endangered species, live in Frick's Cave in Walker County.

Courtesy of Georgia Wildlife Federation

Deer

Deer

Deer forage in a wooded area at Red Top Mountain State Park near Cartersville. Deer are able to survive within a plant community during any stage of its succession.

Stone Mountain Yellow Daisies

Stone Mountain Yellow Daisies

The "Confederate Daisy," or "Stone Mountain Yellow Daisy," grows in the shallow soil on the granite outcrops of Stone Mountain. The flower is so named because it is found only within a sixty-mile radius of the mountain. The species was discovered in 1846.

Photograph by Lee Coursey

Pine on Granite Outcrops

Pine on Granite Outcrops

Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and shortleaf pine (P. echinata) are among the few species of trees able to survive the harsh environment of granite outcrops.

Photograph by Melinda Smith Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Plant Community on Granite Outcrop

Plant Community on Granite Outcrop

Although many plants from the surrounding forest and old-field communities cannot survive on granite outcrops, a unique and highly specialized group of plant species are able to thrive in the thin soil layers on the rock. The soil is shallow at the edges of the outcrop and becomes progressively deeper toward the center.

Photograph by Melinda Smith Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Lichens and Mosses on Granite Outcrop

Lichens and Mosses on Granite Outcrop

Lichens and mosses grow on a granite outcrop at Panola Mountain State Park in Stockbridge. As resurrection plants, lichens and mosses are able to resume photosynthesis after a drought, making them ideally suited to the desert-like conditions on the outcrops.

Photograph by Melinda Smith Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Mat-forming Quillwort

Mat-forming Quillwort

The mat-forming quillwort (Isoetes tegetiformans) is a spore-producing (no flowers) plant found only in a few granite outcrops of the Georgia Piedmont region.

Right Whale

Right Whale

The North Atlantic right whale is the world's most endangered large whale. Less than 350 individuals remain.

Image from Moira Brown

William Bartram

William Bartram

William Bartram, an accomplished naturalist and artist, traveled widely throughout the southeastern United States in the late eighteenth century.

Courtesy of Independence National Historical Park Collection, Philadelphia

Franklin Tree

Franklin Tree

Bartram's Travels is an account of his second trip to the Southeast (1773-77). He accurately described the flora and fauna in their natural habitats, including Georgia's rare Franklin tree (Franklinia alatamaha).

From Travels, by W. Bartram

Bartram Travels Title Page

Bartram Travels Title Page

The title page of William Bartram's Travels (1791). The book has been reprinted many times and continues to fascinate American readers.

Red Sponge

Red Sponge

Black seabasses and sponges at Gray's Reef, one of the largest nearshore live-bottom reefs of the southeastern United States. The Gray's Reef sanctuary is located thirty-two kilometers off Sapelo Island.

Image from Virginia Sea Grant

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Blue Fin

Blue Fin

The research vessel Blue Fin is operated by Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, located on Skidaway Island in Savannah.

Courtesy of Ed Deering

Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

The Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, located on Skidaway Island near Savannah, is an autonomous research unit within the University System of Georgia. The institute's 700-acre campus contains facilities for both saltwater and freshwater ecological research and supports approximately fourteen faculty and seventy staff members.

Image from Michael Rivera

Bullfrog

Bullfrog

Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) are the largest North American frogs and can be almost eight inches long. They are found in lakes, bogs, and ponds and will eat almost anything they can catch, including insects, fish, mice, and other frogs.

Photograph by Carl D. Howe

Red-Spotted Newts

Red-Spotted Newts

The red spots on this juvenile newt are warnings of toxic skin secretions. Because of this chemical defense, red-spotted newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) can coexist with fish, which often eat other salamanders.

Image from Nicholas A. Tonelli

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Tiger Salamander

Tiger Salamander

The tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) is fast-growing and large, and it approaches eight inches in length. This terrestrial salamander is usually black with yellow markings that may come in the form of spots, blotches, bands, or even short stripes.

Image from Peter Paplanus

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Rat Snake

Rat Snake

Rat snakes (Elaphe obsoleta) are commonly found in wooded or swampy areas. Known as the "chicken snake" in farming areas because they will readily eat chicks and chicken eggs, rat snakes also enter barns in search of mice and rats. Like corn snakes, they are very good climbers.

Image from Alabama Extension

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Alligator Snapping Turtle

Alligator Snapping Turtle

The alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii) is the largest freshwater turtle in North America. An adult can weigh from 35 to 200 pounds. This turtle has very powerful jaws.

Image from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Southeast Region

Ground Skink

Ground Skink

Ground skinks (Scincella lateralis) inhabit pine and mixed hardwood forests where leaf litter is abundant. They are brown with black stripes on their backs and range in size from three to five inches. Ground skinks feed on insects and spiders.

Image from Dan Mooney

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Green Anole

Green Anole

Green anoles (Anolis carolinensis) live in trees, shrubs, vines, and tall grasses. These lizards can often be found on fences and walls. Green anoles are also known as chameleons because they can quickly change color from green (when they fight) to brown (during cool weather).

Image from Vicki DeLoach

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Scarlet Kingsnake

Scarlet Kingsnake

The scarlet kingsnake (Lampropeltis triangulum) is restricted to wooded areas, primarily pine. Adults are usually less than two feet long. The diet of these snakes includes baby rodents, small lizards, and snakes.

Image from Peter Paplanus

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American Alligator

American Alligator

American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) are found on the Upper Coastal Plain of Georgia, in swampy areas, rivers, streams, lakes, and ponds. They are the last of the living reptiles that were closely related to dinosaurs.

Image from gailhampshire

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Marbled Salamander

Marbled Salamander

The marbled salamander (Ambystoma opacum) is three to five inches in length. The ground color is Black, and there are numerous silver-white crossbands, giving the marbled appearance for which the species is named.

Image from Peter Paplanus

Eastern Box Turtle

Eastern Box Turtle

The eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina carolina) is primarily terrestrial, and during periods of inactivity, it will find shelter under leaf litter or rotting logs. The box turtle has a high-domed carapace that is olive to brown with yellow markings.

Image from Ezra S F

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Six-Lined Racerunner

Six-Lined Racerunner

The six-lined racerunner (Cnemidophorus sexlineatus) lives in dry, sunny areas, such as grasslands and open woodlands. The slender bodies of these lizards range in size from six to eleven inches. They feed on insects.

Image from Hans Hillewaert

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Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River

The Chattahoochee River, part of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basin, is one of the nation's most endangered rivers. In addition to providing habitat for birds, mammals, and reptiles, the river supports six endangered or threatened mussel species. The river begins in the Blue Ridge Mountains and flows to southwest Georgia.

Photograph by Dianne Frost

Chattahoochee River Headwaters

Chattahoochee River Headwaters

This spring near Jacks Knob Trail in Union County is the likely source of the Chattahoochee River. Georgia is a headwaters state—many rivers begin in the state, but none within its borders has its origins elsewhere.

Courtesy of Edwin L. Jackson

Flint River

Flint River

The Flint River runs through Sprewell Bluff State Park in Upson County. Rivers are slow in the Piedmont region because of the flatter, rolling topography.

Photograph by Doug Bradley

Sweetwater Creek

Sweetwater Creek

The Georgia Conservancy acquired more than 2,000 acres in Douglas County in the late 1960s, which became Sweetwater Creek State Park. Sweetwater Creek runs through the Lithia Springs park on its way to the Chattahoochee River. The acquisition of this land for the state was one of the conservancy's earliest victories.

Photograph by Jeff Gunn

Upper Coastal Plain

Upper Coastal Plain

Many blackwater rivers originate in the Coastal Plain. Large floodplains and swamp systems are often associated with these river systems, which are critically important for restoring groundwater, preserving wildlife habitat, and reducing water pollution.

Freshwater Mussels

Freshwater Mussels

As of 2003 thirteen of Georgia's ninety-eight species of freshwater mussels were protected under the Endangered Species Act, and four more were candidates for listing; only a single species of Georgia's sixty-seven freshwater snails was listed in 2003, and one other species was a candidate.

Courtesy of Paula M. Gagnon

Chestnut Seedlings

Chestnut Seedlings

American chestnut seedlings growing at Pennsylvania State University's Arboretum, a partnership research project with the American Chestnut Foundation.

Courtesy of The American Chestnut Foundation

Chestnut Tree

Chestnut Tree

Vintage photo of an American chestnut tree, taken in the early twentieth century.

Courtesy of The American Chestnut Foundation

Chestnut Tree

Chestnut Tree

Surviving American chestnut tree in Kentucky, 2003.

Courtesy of The American Chestnut Foundation

Chestnut Burr

Chestnut Burr

Open burr of an American chestnut.

Courtesy of The American Chestnut Foundation

Dead Chestnut Tree

Dead Chestnut Tree

An American chestnut tree after destruction by the blight, circa 1900.

Courtesy of The American Chestnut Foundation

American Chestnut

American Chestnut

An American chestnut tree infected with the fungus imported from Asia, commonly known as the blight.

Courtesy of The American Chestnut Foundation

American Chestnut

American Chestnut

A photo of American chestnut flowers that have been bagged for controlled pollination. American chestnut trees provided the most useful hardwood in the United States until a widespread fungus almost eradicated the species.

Courtesy of American Chestnut Foundation

American Chestnut

American Chestnut

Three loggers sit in a partially cut American chestnut tree, circa 1850. Prior to 1900 the American chestnut covered approximately one-quarter of the Appalachian forests, with its range extending into the Piedmont region and mountains of north Georgia.

Courtesy of American Chestnut Foundation

Franklin Tree Flower

Franklin Tree Flower

The Franklin tree or lost camellia (Franklinia alatamaha), once native only to Georgia, was discovered along the banks of the Altamaha River in the mid-eighteenth century and was last recorded in the wild by nurseryman and plant collector in 1803. All known specimens today are in cultivation.

Photograph from Francine Riez, Wikimedia

Franklin Tree

Franklin Tree

In 2008 this specimen of Franklinia alatamaha was named Georgia State Champion by the Georgia Forestry Commission for being the largest of its species in the state. 

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Photograph by John Manion.

Commemorative Stamp

Commemorative Stamp

This six-cent stamp was issued August 23, 1969, in Seattle, Washington, as part of a set of four stamps showing famous plants associated with the four regions of the country. Franklinia alatamaha was chosen to represent the South.

Peruvian Bark

Peruvian Bark

Peruvian bark (Cinchona calisaya), also known as quinine, was grown during the mid-eighteenth century in the Trustee Garden at Savannah. Cultivated by the Georgia colonists as a medical botanical for the lowering of fevers, quinine was later used in the nineteenth century to treat malaria.

From Kohler's Medizinal-Pflanzen, by F. E. Kohler

Trustee Garden Depiction

Trustee Garden Depiction

Even before the Savannah settlement was a reality, artist John Pine produced this imaginary depiction of clearing the land. The central clearing in the background of his 1732 engraving may reflect the early planners' vision of a public garden as an integral part of the new colony.

Grapes

Grapes

European varieties known to produce the best wines, also called "noble grapes," were among the plants cultivated in the Trustee Garden. The imported grapes did not thrive, although native varieties in the region flourished.

Mulberry Tree

Mulberry Tree

The white mulberry tree (Morus alba) was introduced to Georgia in 1734, when James Oglethorpe established the Trustee Garden in Savannah. Mulberry leaves are used to feed silkworms, which the colonists raised to make silk for shipment to England.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Smooth Sumac

Smooth Sumac

Sumac (Rhus glabra), a native North American plant with medicinal properties, was cultivated in the Trustee Garden by early settlers to the Georgia colony and sent to London, England. The garden was established in 1734 as an agricultural experiment station modeled after the physick and botanical gardens at Oxford and Chelsea in England.

Image from formulanone

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