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Techwood Homes Dedication

Techwood Homes Dedication

U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt speaks in Atlanta at the dedication ceremony for Techwood Homes, the nation's first public housing project, on November 29, 1935.

Techwood Homes

Techwood Homes

Techwood Homes, pictured in 1948, was the first public housing project built in the United States. Completed in 1936, the project was located northwest of downtown Atlanta and offered row houses, garden apartments, and playgrounds for 604 white families. Techwood Homes was not integrated until 1968.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Kenneth Rogers Photograph Collection.

Techwood Flats

Techwood Flats

An unidentified woman stands outside her home in Techwood Flats, an impoverished Atlanta neighborhood, circa 1930. Techwood Flats was razed in 1934 to make way for Techwood Homes, the first public housing project in the nation. Many of the neighborhood's Black residents were never rehoused.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Kenneth Rogers Photograph Collection.

Techwood Homes Dedication

Techwood Homes Dedication

Crowds gather at Grant Field, located on the campus of Georgia Tech in Atlanta, on November 29, 1935, for the dedication of Techwood Homes, the nation's first public housing project. U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered an address and turned on electricity to the homes during the dedication ceremony.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Kenneth Rogers Photograph Collection.

Techwood Homes Construction

Techwood Homes Construction

Construction teams complete work on a storm sewer in 1936 for Techwood Homes, the nation's first public housing project, which opened in Atlanta that same year. Designed by the architectural firm Burge and Stevens, Techwood Homes was developed by the federal Public Works Administration.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Kenneth Rogers Photograph Collection.

Techwood Homes

Techwood Homes

Children, pictured in 1948, play football on the grounds of Techwood Homes, the nation's first public housing project. Completed in Atlanta in 1936, Techwood Homes provided residents with open space and lush landscaping, as well as homes featuring the latest electrical appliances.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Kenneth Rogers Photograph Collection.

Miss Freedom

Miss Freedom

Originally christened the "Goddess of Liberty," the statue atop the capitol dome in Atanta is now referred to as "Miss Freedom." The statue, made of copper sheets over a hollow frame, stands at just over 26 feet and weighs 1,600 pounds.

Old Atlanta City Hall

Old Atlanta City Hall

Built in 1854, this two-story building served briefly as the home to three governments when it housed the General Assembly, Atlanta City Hall, and Fulton County Courthouse beginning in July 1868. In January 1869, the legislature moved to the Kimball Opera House, where it remained until 1889.

Georgia State Capitol

Georgia State Capitol

The state capitol building, completed in 1889, features a cornerstone, interior floor and steps, and many walls made of Georgia marble. Marble mined in the state was also used to construct 60 percent of the monuments and the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Capitol Cornerstone

Capitol Cornerstone

Between 6,000 and 10,000 people gathered in Atlanta on September 2, 1885, to watch the setting of the marble cornerstone for the new state capitol. Final construction on the building took place in March 1889, and the capitol was dedicated a few months later on the Fourth of July.

Georgia State Capitol

Georgia State Capitol

The state capitol of Georgia, built in Atlanta in 1889, is pictured before the application of gold to the dome in 1959.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ful0092.

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Georgia State Capitol

Georgia State Capitol

Georgia's gold-domed state capitol, built on a hill in downtown Atlanta, was completed in 1889. At approximately 272 feet from the ground floor, the building was the tallest in the city at the time of its construction and today is the third tallest capitol in the South.

Photograph by Jim Everson, DVM

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Capitol Dome

Capitol Dome

Residents of Dahlonega and Lumpkin County, the site of Georgia's gold rush in 1829, donated twenty ounces of gold in 1958 to cover the state capitol dome in Atlanta. The dome was regilded about twenty years later and today is maintained on an ongoing basis.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Wagon Train to Capitol

Wagon Train to Capitol

In 1979, during a fund-raising effort to regild the state capitol dome, a wagon train crossed the state, visiting each of Georgia's former capitals. In November the wagons arrived in downtown Atlanta with their cargo of gold. The train was protected by a mounted escort from the Fulton County sheriff's department.

Capitol Complex Plan

Capitol Complex Plan

In 1974 a master plan for the state capitol complex in downtown Atlanta was completed. Although Twin Towers Office Building was built in the early 1980s, no other construction on the complex has yet taken place.

Morton Theatre

Morton Theatre

The historic Morton Theatre was built by Monroe B. "Pink" Morton in 1910 at "Hot Corner" (Hull and Washington streets) in Athens as a cultural center for the Black community. It was the first vaudeville theater in the country to be built, owned, and operated by an African American.

Photograph by Melinda Smith Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Morton Theatre

Morton Theatre

As a primary venue of entertainment for the African American community in Athens, the Morton Theatre hosted some of the most prominent vaudeville, blues, and jazz performers during the first half of the nineteenth century

Morton Theatre

Morton Theatre

One of only four Black vaudeville theaters remaining in the country, the historic Morton Theatre in Athens was renovated by Atlanta architect J. W. Robinson and preservation architect Lane Greene.

Fox Theatre Auditorium

Fox Theatre Auditorium

The Fox Theatre auditorium with curtain and proscenium.

Courtesy of Fox Theatre. Photograph by Michael Portman

Fox Theatre Marquee

Fox Theatre Marquee

The Fox Theatre marquee at night. The Fox has dominated the performing arts scene in Atlanta.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

Exterior photograph of the Fox Theatre, showing the different parts of the theater building.

Courtesy of Fox Theatre. Photograph by Michael Portman

Organ, Fox Theatre

Organ, Fox Theatre

The Fox Theatre's Moller Deluxe forty-two-rank pipe organ console is known as "Mighty Mo." The Moller has many sound effects, including songbirds and sirens.

Photograph by Michael Portman. Courtesy of Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre Ushers

Fox Theatre Ushers

Fox Theatre ushers, circa 1930s.

Photograph by Edgar Orr. Copyright Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

Crowds line up along two blocks for the grand opening of the Fox Theatre in Atlanta on December 25, 1929. The structure, designed by the architecture firm of Marye, Alger, and Vinour, was originally intended to serve as the city's Yaarab Temple but was redesigned as a theater before its completion.

Photograph by Edgar Orr. Copyright Fox Theatre

Save the Fox Campaign

Save the Fox Campaign

A "Save the Fox" poster from 1976 advertises "An Evening at the Fox" fund-raising event held by Delta Zeta sorority. During the 1970s, the theater was threatened with demolition, but efforts by Atlanta historic preservation groups prevented its destruction.

Courtesy of Fox Theatre. Copyright Delta Zeta Sorority

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

Atlanta's Fox Theatre has seen more than $20 million in restoration projects since coming under the ownership of the nonprofit organization, Atlanta Landmarks, in 1975. The Fox was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

This photograph shows some of the elaborate details of the Fox Theatre's right organ chamber and proscenium.

Egyptian Ballroom, Fox Theatre

Egyptian Ballroom, Fox Theatre

The Egyptian Ballroom stage of the Fox Theatre.

Sapelo Lighthouse

Sapelo Lighthouse

Sapelo Island lighthouse

Little Cumberland Island Lighthouse

Little Cumberland Island Lighthouse

The lighthouse, built in 1838, is located on the northern tip of Little Cumberland Island in St. Andrew Sound. The Little Cumberland Island Lighthouse is now owned and preserved by a private foundation.

Tybee Island Lighthouse

Tybee Island Lighthouse

The surviving Tybee Island Lighthouse still has its original foundation, completed in 1773. Maintained by the Tybee Island Historical Society and open to the public, it remains one of America's most intact light stations, with all its historic support structures still on site.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

St. Simons Lighthouse

St. Simons Lighthouse

Architect Charles B. Cluskey designed the 104-foot brick lighthouse on St. Simons Island, which was completed in 1872. Confederate troops destroyed the island's first lighthouse in 1862. The station, maintained by the Coastal Georgia Historical Society, is open to the public.

Courtesy of UGA Archway Partnership

Sapelo Island Lighthouse

Sapelo Island Lighthouse

A hurricane in October 1898 seriously undermined the foundation of the original Sapelo Lighthouse. In September 1905 a new lighthouse—a 100-foot steel pyramidal tower with a kerosene-lit flashing light—was activated and a third-order Fresnel lens was installed.

Image from Kevin

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Tybee Island Lighthouse

Tybee Island Lighthouse

The lighthouse on Tybee Island is the island's most recognized landmark. Constructed in 1736, the lighthouse is one of the oldest in the nation still in operation. Renovations began on the lighthouse in 1999, and in 2002 ownership and management of the lighthouse transferred to the Tybee Island Historical Society.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Lighthouse on Cockspur Island

Lighthouse on Cockspur Island

The Cockspur Island lighthouse (1857) is unusual in that its eastern side is shaped like the prow of a ship, which helps the tower withstand the effects of wind and water. It survived the Civil War with no damage.

Cockspur Island Lighthouse

Cockspur Island Lighthouse

The Cockspur Island Lighthouse, erected in 1857 and built of Savannah gray brick, overlooks Fort Pulaski on Tybee Island.

Image from Dizzy Girl

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Old Governor’s Mansion

Old Governor’s Mansion

The Old Governor's Mansion is located in Milledgeville, the state's capital from 1807 to 1868. Construction on the mansion began in 1836 and was completed in 1838 or 1839. It is considered one of the finest examples of Greek revival style in the nation.

Courtesy of Georgia College and State University