Gibson

Glascock County Courthouse
Gibson, the seat of Glascock County, is located in the Upper Coastal Plain of east central Georgia, about thirty-five miles southwest of Augusta and about thirty-eight miles northeast of Milledgeville. The town is situated at the intersection of Georgia highways 171 and 102. According to the 2010 U.S. census, the population was 663.
The legislative act creating Glascock County from Warren County in 1857 authorized the county officers to select a site for the erection of public buildings. Calvin Logue, a resident of the new county, donated twenty acres of land for the purpose. Town lots were laid out, and settlement began in early 1858. A monument in Logue's honor was erected in the town square in 1952. The town was named for Judge William Gibson, an Augusta lawyer and native of Warren County, who donated $500 for a courthouse. The city was incorporated in 1913.
The current Glascock County Courthouse in Gibson was built in 1919 and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1980. The old county courthouse, which dates to 1858, was moved from its previous location and is now a private home.
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Further Reading
Centennial of Glascock County, Georgia, 1857-1957 (Gibson, Ga.: Glascock County Centennial Corporation, 1957).
Cite This Article
Brown, Russell K. "Gibson." New Georgia Encyclopedia. 07 December 2016. Web. 16 January 2020.
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Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries