Updated Recently

Christian Science

Christian Science

3 days ago
Alice Walker

Alice Walker

3 days ago
Etowah Mounds

Etowah Mounds

5 days ago
Baptists Today

Baptists Today

6 days ago

Explore Georgia’s rich music history

From blues and soul to classical and country—our Spotify playlists feature 130+ songs written and performed by Georgians.

Cecil Alexander

Cecil Alexander

As part of the top 10 percent of naval aviators, Cecil Alexander volunteered for the marines and became a dive bomber pilot during World War II. The future Atlanta architect flew a total of sixty missions and was twice awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Courtesy of Cecil Alexander

Cecil Alexander

Cecil Alexander

A prominent Atlanta architect and principal of the FABRAP architectural firm before his retirement, Cecil Alexander was a leader in the movement to desegregate Atlanta's public housing and businesses. He is pictured in 2008.

Reprinted by permission of Stephen H. Moore (http://www.shmoore.com/)

BellSouth Telecommunications Building

BellSouth Telecommunications Building

The BellSouth Telecommunications Building, located at 675 West Peachtree Street in Atlanta, was built in 1980 by the Atlanta-based firm FABRAP, in conjunction with Skidmore Owings and Merrill of New York. It served as headquarters for both Southern Bell and BellSouth. In 2006 BellSouth was absorbed by AT&T, and today the building is part of the AT&T Midtown Center.

Courtesy of AT&T

Coca-Cola Headquarters

Coca-Cola Headquarters

Coca-Cola's headquarters in Atlanta, designed by the architectural firm FABRAP, house the corporate offices as well as the offices for the Coca-Cola Foundation.

Photograph by David A. Pike

Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

The Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium hosts the opening night of the World Series in October 1995. The stadium, jointly designed by the architecture firms FABRAP and Heery and Heery, was completed in 1965 and attracted two professional teams, the Atlanta Braves and the Atlanta Falcons, to the city.

Helen and Cecil Alexander

Helen and Cecil Alexander

The architect Cecil Alexander, a founding partner of the firm FABRAP, and his second wife, Helen, pictured at their home in Atlanta in 2007.

Reprinted by permission of Stephen H. Moore (http://www.shmoore.com/)

Southern Bell Telephone Building

Southern Bell Telephone Building

The original Southern Bell Telephone Building in Atlanta, pictured in 2008, was designed by architect P. Thornton Marye in the late 1920s. The art deco-style building was advertised as the city's "first modernistic skyscraper." The building's original six stories were extended to fourteen in the 1940s and topped with a tower in the 1960s.

Photograph by Mary Ann Sullivan

Atlanta Terminal Station

Atlanta Terminal Station

The Atlanta Terminal Station, pictured circa 1905, was designed in a Renaissance revival style by architect P. Thornton Marye. The structure, a pioneer work in reinforced concrete, was razed in 1971.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ful0100.

View on partner site

Atlanta Terminal Station

Atlanta Terminal Station

Passengers walk through the Atlanta Terminal Station in 1967, four years before the structure was demolished. The station, built in 1905, was designed by architect P. Thornton Marye.

Courtesy of George Lane

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Atlanta, pictured in 2005, was built in 1906. The church was designed in the Gothic revival style by architect P. Thornton Marye, in association with A. Ten Eyck Brown.

Courtesy of Atlanta Time Machine

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

The Fox Theatre in Atlanta, pictured from the south in 2002, was originally designed as the Yaraab Temple by the architectural firm Marye, Alger, and Vinour. The building opened as a theater in 1929.

Photograph by Mary Ann Sullivan

Atlanta City Hall

Atlanta City Hall

Atlanta City Hall, pictured in 1942, was designed by G. Lloyd Preacher in the neo-Gothic style. Completed in 1930, the building stands at the corner of Washington and Mitchell streets.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # ful0154.

View on partner site

University Hospital

University Hospital

University Hospital in Augusta, pictured in the 1920s, was designed by Atlanta architect G. Lloyd Preacher. The building was completed in 1915 and razed in 1991.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ric003.

View on partner site

Briarcliff Hotel

Briarcliff Hotel

Architect G. Lloyd Preacher's Briarcliff Hotel, also known as the "Seven Fifty," was built in Atlanta on the corner of Ponce de Leon and North Highland avenues in 1924-25.

Georgia Dome

Georgia Dome

The Georgia Dome in Atlanta was designed by architect George T. Heery's firm in collaboration with Rosser Fabrap International (formerly FABRAP). Completed in 1992 and demolished in 2017, the stadium was home to the Atlanta Falcons football team and also served as a venue for numerous other events.

Image from Michael Barera

Georgia Power Building

Georgia Power Building

The Georgia Power Building in downtown Atlanta, designed by Heery Architects and Engineers, houses the headquarters for both the Georgia Power Company and the Georgia Power Foundation. In 2004 the Georgia Power Foundation awarded $5 million in grants to organizations primarily in the state of Georgia.

Image from Counse

View on source site

Atlanta History Museum

Atlanta History Museum

The Atlanta History Museum, located on the campus of the Atlanta History Center, is one of the Southeast's largest history museums. The 30,000-square-foot facility, designed by architect George T. Heery, opened in 1993 and houses four permanent exhibitions, as well as two galleries for traveling exhibitions.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Georgia Archives

Georgia Archives

The Georgia Archives building, built in 1965 on Capitol Avenue in downtown Atlanta, was designed by A. Thomas Bradbury, the architect for several government buildings around the state capitol. In 2003 the archives relocated to a new site in Morrow.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives.

Yaarab Shrine Temple

Yaarab Shrine Temple

The Yaarab Shrine Temple in Atlanta is pictured in 1965, the year of its completion. The temple was designed by Atlanta architect A. Thomas Bradbury.

Labor Building

Labor Building

The Labor Building in Atlanta, pictured in 1955, was designed by A. Thomas Bradbury, a native of the city and graduate of the architecture school at Georgia Tech. Bradbury also designed the buildings housing the departments of human resources and transportation in Atlanta.

Governor’s Mansion

Governor’s Mansion

The Governor's Mansion, completed in 1967, was designed in the Greek revival style by Atlanta architect A. Thomas Bradbury. The thirty-room home, located in the Buckhead area of Atlanta, was first occupied by Governor Lester Maddox.

Photograph from Georgia.gov

Charles E. Choate

Charles E. Choate

Charles E. Choate, a native of Houston County, was a Methodist minister and architect in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He designed several churches throughout the state, as well as commercial buildings and residences, particularly in Washington County.

Courtesy of the Washington County Chamber of Commerce

Tennille Baptist Church

Tennille Baptist Church

Tennille Baptist Church, pictured in the 1960s, was built in Washington County in 1900. The building was designed in the Romanesque revival style by Georgia architect Charles E. Choate, who was also a Methodist minister.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #was365.

View on partner site

Tennille Banking Company

Tennille Banking Company

The building for the Tennille Banking Company, pictured circa 1915, was designed by Georgia architect Charles E. Choate and completed in 1900. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1994.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
was277.

View on partner site

William C. Pauley

William C. Pauley

William C. Pauley, a landscape architect, designed numerous parks and college grounds in Georgia and the Southeast during the twentieth century. In 1919 he became the first landscape architect to establish a practice in Atlanta. Among his most important projects in the state are the Gardens at Bankshaven in Newnan and Hurt Park in Atlanta.

Courtesy of Spencer Tunnell

Edward Daugherty

Edward Daugherty

Edward Daugherty, pictured in 2006, is a prominent Atlanta landscape architect. Among his many projects in Georgia are the Atlanta Botanical Garden and the grounds of the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he also studied before earning his bachelor's and master's degrees from Harvard University.

Atlanta Botanical Garden

Atlanta Botanical Garden

Landscape architect Edward Daugherty contributed to the design of the Atlanta Botanical Garden grounds from 1981 until 1995. The garden, which offers displays, tours, and classes to the public, opened in the 1970s.

Image from JR P

View on source site

Ellamae Ellis League

Ellamae Ellis League

Renowned Georgia architect Ellamae Ellis League (right) looks over building plans with her daughter Jean in 1952. A native of Macon, League was a practicing architect in that city from 1922 until 1975. At the time of her death in 1991, she was the only woman in Georgia admitted as a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.

Ballard-Hudson High School

Ballard-Hudson High School

Ballard-Hudson High School in Bibb County was designed by Ellamae Ellis League, who opened her own architecture practice in Macon in 1934. Before her retirement in 1975, League designed many churches, schools, and hospitals, which were reportedly her favorite projects.

Ellamae Ellis League

Ellamae Ellis League

Ellamae Ellis League stands at the construction site for the Macon-Bibb County Health Center in 1957. League, a prominent Macon architect, designed this building, as well as numerous other structures in the Macon area.

Grand Opera House

Grand Opera House

In 1968, seven years before her retirement, renowned architect Ellamae Ellis League began restoration work on the Grand Opera House in Macon. That same year, League was elected as a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. She was one of only eight female fellows by the time of her death in 1991.

Image from Mark Strozier

View on source site

Piedmont Park

Piedmont Park

Designed by the sons of famed landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, Piedmont Park conforms to the principles established by Olmsted.

Frederick Law Olmsted

Frederick Law Olmsted

Frederick Law Olmsted, at work around 1890, is credited with founding the profession of landscape architecture. Olmsted designed the Druid Park area of Atlanta, and many of the city's parks, including Piedmont and Grant, follow his design principles.

Image from James Notman

Frederick and Marion Olmsted

Frederick and Marion Olmsted

Frederick Law Olmsted, the "father of landscape design," visits the Biltmore estate in Asheville, North Carolina, with his daughter Marion during the early 1890s. Olmsted designed the estate's grounds, which include gardens, parks, and the nation's first managed forest.

Courtesy of National Park Service, Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site

Frederick Law Olmsted

Frederick Law Olmsted

Frederick Law Olmsted poses for a portrait around 1860. A New England native, Olmsted traveled through the South from 1852 to 1854, visiting Georgia twice during that time. He returned to the state in the 1890s to consult with the Cotton States Exposition Commission and to design Druid Hills, a suburban development in Atlanta.

Courtesy of National Park Service, Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site

Oak Grove Park

Oak Grove Park

Oak Grove Park, once known as Brightwood Park, is one of six segments comprising the Olmsted Linear Park in Atlanta. The other five segments are Deepdene, Dellwood, Shadyside, Springdale, and Virgilee. Since 1997 the park has been the focus of a restoration and preservation campaign, spearheaded by the Olmsted Linear Park Alliance.

Photograph by Melinda Smith Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Federal Reserve Bank Building

Federal Reserve Bank Building

Henrietta Dozier, the first female architect in Georgia, served as associate and supervising architect for the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, constructed in 1923-24 in Jacksonville, Florida. The exterior of the building, which was designed in a Neoclassical Revival style, has remained nearly unchanged since the time of its completion.

From Jacksonville's Architectural Heritage, by W. W. Wood. Photograph by Judy Davis and David Vedas

Henrietta Dozier

Henrietta Dozier

Henrietta Dozier was the first woman in Georgia to work as a professional architect, and she was a founding member of the Atlanta Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Dozier designed several buildings in Atlanta between 1901 and 1916, including the Episcopal Chapel for the All Saints Episcopal Church and the Southern Ruralist Building.

From Jacksonville's Architectural Heritage, by W. W. Wood

Clermont Lee

Clermont Lee

Clermont Lee, the first female professional landscape architect to open a private practice in Savannah, works in the Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace garden.

Courtesy of Juliette Low Birthplace

Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace Garden

Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace Garden

During the 1950s, Clermont Lee designed gardens for several of Savannah's most prominent historic homes, including the Andrew Low House, the Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace, and the Green-Meldrim mansion. This aerial view of the Juliette Low garden was taken around 1956.

Courtesy of Juliette Low Birthplace

Big Bethel AME Church

Big Bethel AME Church

Big Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church on Auburn Avenue is one of the rehabilitation projects undertaken by J. W. Robinson in the Sweet Auburn historic district.

Courtesy of J. W. Robinson & Associates, Inc.

J. W. Robinson

J. W. Robinson

J. W. Robinson, pictured in June 2006, was an influential Georgia architect. In addition to his firm's work on such public projects as parks, university buildings, and churches in Atlanta, Robinson took an active role in the preservation of historic buildings in the state.

Courtesy of J. W. Robinson & Associates, Inc.

Fire Station # 38

Fire Station # 38

J. W. Robinson received an award from the Atlanta chapter of the American Institute of Architects for his design of Fire Station #38, one of the first projects of J. W. Robinson & Associates, Inc.

Courtesy of J. W. Robinson & Associates, Inc.

C. B. King U.S. Courthouse

C. B. King U.S. Courthouse

The federal courthouse in Albany, named for civil rights attorney C. B. King, was designed by architect J. W. Robinson in 1992 and completed in 2002. It may be the first federal courthouse in the United States to be designed by an African American architect.

Courtesy of Jeffrey L. Robinson

Morton Theatre

Morton Theatre

One of only four Black vaudeville theaters remaining in the country, the historic Morton Theatre in Athens was renovated by Atlanta architect J. W. Robinson and preservation architect Lane Greene.

Martin Luther King Jr. Birthplace

Martin Luther King Jr. Birthplace

The birthplace of Martin Luther King Jr. in Atlanta is one of the many historic properties that J. W. Robinson has worked to restore.

Image from Wally Gobetz

View on source site

Thornton House

Thornton House

The Thornton House, designed by J. W. Robinson and built in 1962, is the first Black-designed and -constructed home to be situated in an Atlanta neighborhood long barred to African Americans. Eventually this neighborhood became a mecca for prominent Black professionals and politicians.

Courtesy of J. W. Robinson and Associates, Inc.

Henderson-Orr House

Henderson-Orr House

The Henderson-Orr House (1832), an I-house built by architect Collin Rogers in rural Coweta County, includes the original interior woodwork. The antebellum structure has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Nathan Van Boddie House

Nathan Van Boddie House

The Nathan Van Boddie House (1836), located near LaGrange, represents the mature work of architect Collin Rogers. This Georgian-plan house is dominated by a two-story temple-front Ionic portico with a modillion cornice.

Interior of Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place

Interior of Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place

The Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place (1835-40) in Troup County features finely carved entrance surrounds, which are characteristic of Collin Rogers's later work.

Henderson-Orr House, Side View

Henderson-Orr House, Side View

Collin Rogers built the Henderson-Orr House (1832), an I-house in rural Coweta County, in the Neoclassical style.

Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place

Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place

The Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place (1835-40), a Georgian-plan house, was designed by architect Collin Rogers and is an example of his mature work.

Lowther Hall

Lowther Hall

Lowther Hall, pictured in 1934, was designed by architect Daniel Pratt and built during 1822-23 in Clinton (Jones County).

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Collection

Daniel Pratt

Daniel Pratt

Daniel Pratt lived in Milledgeville from 1821 to 1831, during which time he built several large Neoclassical-style houses.

Courtesy of Alabama Department of Archives and History

Andrew Low House, Savannah

Andrew Low House, Savannah

Architect John Norris began designing the Andrew Low House, on Lafayette Square in Savannah, in 1847. The three-story stucco-over-brick structure was designed in the Italianate style. Juliette Gordon Low married Andrew Low's son, and she went on to found the Girl Scouts of America in this house in 1912.

Savannah Custom House

Savannah Custom House

John Norris's first commission in Savannah was for the Savannah Custom House (1848-52), which he designed in the Greek revival style.

Green-Meldrim House

Green-Meldrim House

The Green-Meldrim House (1853) is one of the earliest Gothic revival houses in Georgia and is distinguished by its cast-iron porch and oriel windows.

John Stoddard’s Upper Range

John Stoddard’s Upper Range

John Stoddard's Upper Range warehouse (1859), built in the Italianate style, was among Norris's final projects in Savannah.

Georgia Health Sciences University

Georgia Health Sciences University

The original building on the campus of Georgia Health Sciences University, completed in Augusta in 1837, was designed by the architect Charles B. Cluskey. The structure, Cluskey's first major building, is an excellent example of the Greek revival style.

Courtesy of Georgia Health Sciences University

Old Governor’s Mansion

Old Governor’s Mansion

A small crowd is gathered outside the Governor's Mansion in Milledgeville around 1880. The open brick fence is noteworthy. The state's governors resided here from 1838 to 1868.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #bal019.

View on partner site

Old Governor’s Mansion, 1904

Old Governor’s Mansion, 1904

Photograph of the Old Governor's Mansion in Milledgeville, 1904. At this time, the structure served as the home for the president of Georgia Normal and Industrial College (later, Georgia College and State University).

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal169.

View on partner site

Old Governor’s Mansion, 1941

Old Governor’s Mansion, 1941

Photograph of the Old Governor's Mansion in Milledgeville, circa 1941. Between 1891 and 1987, each president of Georgia College and State University has lived in the house.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal061.

View on partner site

Old Governor’s Mansion, 1960s

Old Governor’s Mansion, 1960s

Interior view of the Old Governor's Mansion in the early 1960s during restoration, which was completed in 1967. The Greek revival–style structure was designed by Charles Cluskeyand built in the late 1830s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal094.

View on partner site

Historic St. Simons Island Lighthouse

Historic St. Simons Island Lighthouse

Historic photograph, circa 1914, of the St. Simons Island Lighthouse, which was designed by architect Charles Cluskey. Cluskey was hired to rebuild the lighthouse after it was damaged in the Civil War; he died before the project was completed.

Owens-Thomas House

Owens-Thomas House

The Owens-Thomas House (1819) in Savannah was designed by architect William Jay. The Neoclassical mansion features a Regency-style side porch and a beautiful garden.

Image from JR P

View on source site

Archibald Bulloch House, Savannah

Archibald Bulloch House, Savannah

Architect William Jay built this villa on Orleans Square in Savannah in 1819 for Archibald Bulloch. The house was razed in 1916, and the Savannah Municipal Auditorium was constructed on the site. In turn, the Savannah Civic Center was built on the site, replacing the auditorium, in the 1970s.

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society, Foltz Photography Studio (Savannah, Ga.), photographs, 1899-1960, #1360-08-08-01.

View on partner site

Bank of the United States

Bank of the United States

Engraving of the Bank of the United States (1821), in Savannah. The Greek revival-style building was designed by the architect William Jay and was razed in the 1980s.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey, #HABS GA,26-SAV,38-1.

Wayne-Gordon House

Wayne-Gordon House

The Wayne-Gordon house was designed by the architect William Jay in the Regency style. The Bull Street residence is the birthplace of Juliette Gordon Low and has been home to four generations of the Gordon family.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey Collection, #HABS GA,26-SAV,15-1.

Wayne-Gordon House, Interior

Wayne-Gordon House, Interior

Interior view of the Wayne-Gordon house, the birthplace of Juliette Gordon Low. Designed by architect William Jay, the house is a Regency-style structure, with a stuccoed gray brick facade.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey Collection, #HABS GA,26-SAV,15-6.

Rhodes Hall

Rhodes Hall

Rhodes Hall in Atlanta (1903) is a late example of picturesque Victorian, with its irregular floor plan and massive exterior features in the Romanesque Revival style, accented with castlelike, crenellated towers and parapets. It is one of the finest examples of W. F. Denny's residential work.

Image from Lars Juhl Jensen

View on source site

Swan House

Swan House

The Edward H. Inman (1925-28) House in Atlanta, also known as Swan House, is one of Philip Trammell Shutze's best-known works with the partnership Hentz, Adler and Shutze. Mrs. Inman chose the swan motif from which the house gets its name.

Rich’s Department Store

Rich’s Department Store

Philip Shutze designed this Rich's Department Store in Atlanta, which was built by the architect firm Hentz, Reid, and Adler in 1924.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

View on source site

Flint River Bridge

Flint River Bridge

In 1858 Nelson Tift commissioned Horace King to build this bridge in Albany across the Flint River. In 1887 Tift sold the bridge to Dougherty County. Shown here in 1892, the bridge was destroyed in 1897 when the Flint overflowed its banks during a flood.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # dgh243-86.

View on partner site

Horace King

Horace King

Horace King was the most respected bridge builder in west Georgia, Alabama, and northeast Mississippi from the 1830s until the 1880s.

Courtesy of Theodora Thomas

Covered Bridge Remains

Covered Bridge Remains

The middle support of a covered bridge, built by Horace King in 1838 near West Point (Troup County), is pictured underwater today.

Courtesy of West Georgia Underwater Archaeological Society. Photograph by Laura Knight

Grady High School Stadium

Grady High School Stadium

In Richard Aeck's work, structure is expressive and form is an elegant and direct reflection of construction. His Grady High School Stadium (Atlanta, 1948) is a masterpiece of modern engineering expression.

Photograph by Darby Carl Sanders, New Georgia Encyclopedia

James H. “Sloppy” Floyd Building

James H. “Sloppy” Floyd Building

The twin towers of Richard Aeck's Floyd Building (1975-80) are examples of Modernist architecture in downtown Atlanta.

Photograph by Nick NeSmith/WABE

W. W. Orr Building

W. W. Orr Building

Pringle and Smith's eleven-story W. W. Orr Building (1930) was one of their five landmark Atlanta skyscrapers.

Photograph by Warren LeMay

View on source site

Francis Palmer Smith

Francis Palmer Smith

Francis Palmer Smith, who designed numerous houses, office buildings, and churches in the early twentieth century, is considered the most accomplished architect of his generation in Atlanta.

Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

W. W. Orr Building

W. W. Orr Building

Pringle and Smith's Beaux-Arts style W. W. Orr Building (1930) also incorporated more "modern" art deco elements.

Photograph by Jessica Higgins

William-Oliver Building

William-Oliver Building

Pringle and Smith's William-Oliver Building (1930) in Atlanta is an award-winning National Register Building.

Photograph by Warren LeMay

Cathedral of St. Philip

Cathedral of St. Philip

Francis Smith's career culminated in projects for the Cathedral of St. Philip on Peachtree Road, including the Mikell Memorial Chapel (1947), Hall of Bishops (1955), and the cathedral itself (1960-63), the latter two projects in association with Ayers and Godwin.

Photograph by John Phelan

Park Place Apartments

Park Place Apartments

The practice of Atlanta architect Leila Ross Wilburn emerged from and reflected the values of the Craftsman movement. Craftsman architecture promoted craftsmanship, solid construction, family life, and egalitarian values embodied in small houses for middle-class Americans.

Image from Cynthia Jennings

Leila Ross Wilburn

Leila Ross Wilburn

Wilburn-designed houses proliferated throughout neighborhoods and suburbs of Atlanta and elsewhere in Georgia, where there are more houses by Wilburn than by any other architect from any period.

W. T. Downing

W. T. Downing

Atlanta architect W. T. Downing built his reputation on a wide range of designs that included stylish homes, intricate churches, tall office buildings, and collegiate architecture.

William P. Nicolson House

William P. Nicolson House

The William P. Nicolson House (1892), located on Piedmont Avenue in the Midtown neighborhood of Atlanta, is one of only a few remaining examples of W. T. Downing's residential architecture.

Photograph by Juli Kearns (Idyllopus)

View on source site

The Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

The Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

The Church of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (1897-98) in Atlanta demonstrates W. T. Downing's sure eye for proportion and scale as well as quality of detail. The craftsmanship in brickwork resulted in one of the finest Romanesque Revival churches of the Southeast.

Courtesy of Mary Ann Sullivan, Bluffton College

Lupton Hall, Oglethorpe University

Lupton Hall, Oglethorpe University

Though designed by W. T. Downing, Lupton Hall (1920) at Oglethorpe University in Atlanta wasn't completed until after his death. Other school designs by Downing include buildings at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Shorter University in Rome, and the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.

Image from Distinguished Reflections

View on source site

Wimbish House (Atlanta Woman’s Club)

Wimbish House (Atlanta Woman’s Club)

Among W. T. Downing's best-known surviving houses in Atlanta is the Wimbish House (1898, later Atlanta Woman's Club) in the French Renaissance Revival (or Chateauesque) style.

Image from JJonahJackalope, Wikimedia Commons

View on source site

Fine Arts Building

Fine Arts Building

One of the most highly praised and admired buildings at the 1895 Cotton States and International Exposition in Atlanta was the Beaux-Arts style Fine Arts Building, a monumentally symmetrical and classical building by W. T. Downing.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

William Parkins

William Parkins

Parkins was the most significant architect practicing in Georgia in the immediate post-Civil War decades until he retired from his Atlanta business in the late 1880s.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

Atlanta's Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, built in 1873-80, helped to establish William H. Parkins as one of Georgia's leading architects. More than a century later, in 1982-84, the building was restored by architect Henry Howard Smith, the son of renowned Atlanta architect Francis Palmer Smith, after the church was damaged by fire.

Image from Warren LeMay

Kimball House Hotel

Kimball House Hotel

William Parkins's original Kimball House Hotel (1869-70), a combination of Italianate and Second Empire architecture, burned in 1883.

Image from Jolomo~commonswiki

Windsor Hotel

Windsor Hotel

G. L. Norrman's historic Windsor Hotel (1892) in Americus, Georgia, is an outstanding example of High Victorian or Queen Anne architecture.

G. L. Norrman

G. L. Norrman

Swedish-born Norrman, after coming to Atlanta in 1881, designed a wide array of buildings in the most fashionable styles, using the latest technologies. Norrman worked ceaselessly for the professionalization of architecture in Georgia and the South.

Image from Col. I.W. Avery

Edward C. Peters House

Edward C. Peters House

G. L. Norrman's Edward C. Peters House (1884, restoration and additions 1973), on Ponce de Leon Avenue, is the finest illustration of the Queen Anne style remaining in Atlanta.

Image from Warren LeMay

View on source site

Citizens Bank Building, Savannah

Citizens Bank Building, Savannah

The Citizens Bank Building (1895) in Savannah was designed by architect G. L. Norrman in the Beaux-Arts style. It was the first fireproof building in Savannah. Today, the structure is known as Propes Hall, of the Savannah College of Art and Design.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

Neel Reid

Neel Reid

Neel Reid was the best-known residential architect in Atlanta in the early twentieth century.

Callaway House

Callaway House

The Callaway House, also called Hills and Dales, was completed in LaGrange in 1916. The largest residential commission received by Hentz and Reid, the house established Hal Hentz and Neel Reid as important architects.

From Architecture of Neel Reid in Georgia, by J. Grady

Draper House

Draper House

Hentz and Reid's Draper House (1922) in Atlanta shows the firm's skill in designing a smaller house with grandeur. The front of the house features one of Reid's few Greek revival designs.

From Architecture of Neel Reid in Georgia, by J. Grady

Massee Apartment Building

Massee Apartment Building

The Massee Apartment Building in Macon is one of Hentz, Reid, and Adler's many notable commercial buildings in the state.

Image from The Massee

James White Jr. House

James White Jr. House

The James White Jr. House in Athens, pictured in 1960, was designed by prominent residential architect Neel Reid. Built in 1923, the house is currently home to the Delta Tau Delta fraternity at the University of Georgia.

Courtesy of Owens Library, School of Environment and Design, University of Georgia, Hubert B. Owens Collection, #Box 45.

Brooks Hall

Brooks Hall

Brooks Hall, designed by prominent Atlanta architect Neel Reid, was built in 1928 on the north campus of the University of Georgia in Athens. The building houses the Terry College of Business, which was founded in 1912 as the School of Commerce.

Image from Coxonian

Equitable Building

Equitable Building

John Wellborn Root's eight-story Equitable Building in Atlanta, built in the early 1890s for the developer Joel Hurt, was demolished in 1971, just as Georgia's historic preservation movement was getting under way. Its steel-frame construction and monumental presence made it the city's pioneer skyscraper.

John Wellborn Root

John Wellborn Root

Georgia native John Wellborn Root, one of the key figures in the nationally significant Chicago School of skyscraper design, won praise for his elaborate Equitable Building (1890, razed) in Atlanta.