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1924-1990

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1927-2012

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1850-1926

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Explore Georgia’s rich music history

From blues and soul to classical and country—our Spotify playlists feature 130+ songs written and performed by Georgians.

E. D. Rivers

E. D. Rivers

E. D. Rivers speaks in 1939, during his second gubernatorial term, at a gathering in Union County, located in the north Georgia mountains. During his first term, Rivers secured federal funding to support public housing and rural electrification in the state.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #uni005.

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Sidney Root

Sidney Root

Sidney Root, a prominent Atlanta businessman, was an integral part of the Confederate war effort during the Civil War. He later served as the director of the International Cotton Exposition of 1881 in Atlanta and, as park commissioner for the city, was instrumental in the building of Grant Park.

Sidney Root’s House

Sidney Root’s House

After the fall of Atlanta in 1864, during the Civil War, Union troops occupied the home of Atlanta businessman Sidney Root. Root moved his family to New York City after the war and did not return until 1878. In the interim, he sold his house on South Collins Street to Joseph E. Brown, who served as the governor of Georgia during the war.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Primary Bible Questions for Young Children

Primary Bible Questions for Young Children

Sidney Root, a prominent Atlanta business leader and philanthropist, was a devout Baptist. In 1861 he published a booklet called Primary Bible Questions for Young Children, which sold around 20,000 copies. Pictured is the title page from the 1864 edition.

Herman J. Russell

Herman J. Russell

Georgia governor Joe Frank Harris (left) presents Herman J. Russell, an Atlanta entrepreneur and community leader, with the award for the Atlanta Business League's CEO of the Year in 1986.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, Harmon Perry Photograph Collection.

Atlanta Leaders

Atlanta Leaders

Three prominent civil rights leaders from Atlanta gather in 1987 to endorse the candidacy of Richard Arrington Jr. for mayor of Birmingham, Alabama. Arrington won the election to become the first Black mayor of that city. From left, Herman J. Russell, Andrew Young, Richard Arrington, and Jesse Hill.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta–Fulton Public Library System, Harmon Perry Photograph Collection.

Herman J. Russell

Herman J. Russell

Herman J. Russell (left), founder of the Atlanta-based construction and real estate conglomerate H. J. Russell and Company, consults in 1983 with developer Robert Holder on plans for the Delta Air Lines building in College Park.

Herman J. Russell

Herman J. Russell

A nationally recognized entrepreneur and philanthropist, Herman J. Russell, an Atlanta native, founded H. J. Russell and Company, one of the nation's most profitable minority-owned business empires.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, Hosea Williams Photograph Collection.

BellSouth Telecommunications Building

BellSouth Telecommunications Building

The BellSouth Telecommunications Building, located at 675 West Peachtree Street in Atlanta, was built in 1980 by the Atlanta-based firm FABRAP, in conjunction with Skidmore Owings and Merrill of New York. It served as headquarters for both Southern Bell and BellSouth. In 2006 BellSouth was absorbed by AT&T, and today the building is part of the AT&T Midtown Center.

Courtesy of AT&T

Southern Bell Line Gang

Southern Bell Line Gang

Members of a floating line gang for Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company are pictured in 1928, probably near Covington. Southern Bell, a regional operating company of American Telephone and Telegraph (AT&T), served Georgia from around 1879 until 1984.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives,
Virtual Georgia, #
VRG180.

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BellSouth Van

BellSouth Van

A BellSouth service van contains installation and repair equipment for such products as local and long-distance telephone service, Internet service, and satellite television. BellSouth offered these services in Georgia from 1984 until its merger with AT&T in 2006.

Courtesy of AT&T

Brumby Chair Company

Brumby Chair Company

Workers at the Brumby Chair Company in Marietta pause for their noon break in the summer of 1903. Under the leadership of Thomas Brumby, who helmed the company from 1888 to 1923, the Brumby Chair Company became one of the largest employers in Marietta and one of the largest chair factories in the Southeast.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
cob106.

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Brumby Delivery Truck

Brumby Delivery Truck

A Brumby Chair Company delivery truck is pictured, circa 1928. The Brumby Chair Company, based in Marietta, was incorporated in 1884 by brothers Jim and Thomas Brumby. The company, which the family continues to operate, is best known for its iconic rocking chair.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
cob299.

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Otis Brumby Sr.

Otis Brumby Sr.

Marietta leaders gather in the law office of Rip Blair (seated right) to honor Niles Trammel (seated left), circa 1940. Otis Brumby Sr. (standing far left) was the vice president of Brumby Chair Company. Also standing, from left: Stanton Read, Ed Massey, Jake Northcutt, Eugene McNeel Sr., unknown, Ryburn Clay, J. J. Daniell, Morgan McNeel.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
cob498.

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Carpet Machine

Carpet Machine

While the introduction of new machinery to textile factories in the 1970s resulted in workforce reductions across the state, the carpet industry of north Georgia weathered such changes, producing around 80 percent of the world's carpets in the twenty-first century.

Courtesy of Carpet and Rug Institute

Hosiery Mill

Hosiery Mill

A hosiery mill at Union Point, in Greene County, produces socks in 1941. Textile mills in Georgia began producing a variety of cotton products, including hosiery, carpet yarn, and twine, after 1900.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Young Mill Worker

Young Mill Worker

A young girl, pictured in 1909, works as a spinner in a Georgia cotton mill. Children were a signficant presence in the state's textile mills, accounting for 24 percent of the workforce in 1890.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

New Manchester Mill Ruins

New Manchester Mill Ruins

During the Civil War, Union forces burned the New Manchester Manufacturing Company on July 9, 1864. Today its ruins lie in the Sweetwater Creek State Park in Douglas County. The creek, mill ruins, and surrounding land were preserved by the Georgia Conservancy in the late 1960s.

Image from Travis Hudgons

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Seal of the Trustees

Seal of the Trustees

One face of the seal adopted by the Georgia Trustees features a silkworm, mulberry leaf, and cocoon, representing their hopes that the colonists would establish a thriving silk industry. The Latin motto Non sibi sed aliis  translates as "Not for self, but for others."

Mulberry Tree

Mulberry Tree

The white mulberry tree (Morus alba) was introduced to Georgia in 1734, when James Oglethorpe established the Trustee Garden in Savannah. Mulberry leaves are used to feed silkworms, which the colonists raised to make silk for shipment to England.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River

The Chattahoochee River flows through Columbus, one of the cities located along the fall line marking the boundary between the Piedmont and Coastal Plain geologic provinces. The hard rocks of the Piedmont form outcrops that create rapids and waterfalls along the fall line.

Photograph by andrewI04 

Whitehall Mill Store

Whitehall Mill Store

The Whitehall Mill Store (1850) served the employees of the Georgia Factory, which opened in Athens in 1829. In 1835 Whitehall, the state's first mill village, was established near the factory, on the banks of the North Oconee River. The two-story brick shotgun building features a romanesque facade topped by a two-level battlement.

Courtesy of Owens Library, School of Environment and Design, University of Georgia, John Linley Collection.

New Manchester Mill Ruins

New Manchester Mill Ruins

The ruins of the New Manchester Manufacturing Company, a textile mill burned during the Civil War, are located at Sweetwater Creek State Park, in Douglas County. The mill, one of the largest factories in Georgia, was destroyed in 1864 by Union general William T. Sherman's troops during their march to the sea.

Photograph by Evangelio Gonzalez

Eagle and Phenix Mills

Eagle and Phenix Mills

Eagle and Phenix Mills, built in Columbus around 1868, was eventually acquired by the W. C. Bradley Company, which was founded in 1895 by financier and philanthropist W. C. Bradley. In 2003 the company began a redevelopment project on the old mill site.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Engineering Record, #HAER GA,108-COLM,17-19.

Laurel Woolen Mill

Laurel Woolen Mill

Workers gather in front of the Laurel Woolen Mill in Roswell, circa 1890. The state's textile industry experienced strong growth during the last decades of the nineteenth century, with many northern investors choosing to locate mills in the South.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ful0525.

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Mill Houses

Mill Houses

Mill houses line a street in Dalton, circa 1930. The carpet and textile industries in the city began in the late nineteenth century with the tufted bedspreads of Catherine Evans Whitener and by the 1940s had developed into a mechanized industry in Whitfield County.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
wtf013a.

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Callaway Mills

Callaway Mills

Workers at the Callaway Mills in LaGrange operate weaving machinery, circa 1930. The mills were founded by Fuller Callaway Sr., who operated a number of profitable mills in LaGrange in the early twentieth century.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
trp252.

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Crown Cotton Mill

Crown Cotton Mill

Crown Cotton Mill No. 2, located on Chattanooga Avenue in Dalton, is pictured in the late 1920s. Established in 1884, Crown Cotton Mill brought much-needed economic activity to Whitfield County and by 1916 employed 1,000 workers.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
wtf014b.

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Cotton Billboard

Cotton Billboard

A billboard along a Georgia highway, pictured in 1939, endorses the continuation of the cotton industry in the state. In the years between the two world wars, the textile industry floundered, as numerous small mills closed and workers protested labor code violations.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Textile Strike

Textile Strike

Striking textile workers outside the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mill, 1934. Despite promises of reform made after the General Textile Strike of 1934, conditions in many mills did not improve until 1941, when the United States entered World War II.

Cotton Mill Worker

Cotton Mill Worker

A mill worker is pictured in October 1941 at the Mary-Leila Cotton Mill in Greensboro. Mills in Georgia were profitable during World War II (1941-45), producing such items as nylon and silk, as well as life rafts and uniforms for the war effort.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Thomaston Mills

Thomaston Mills

Employees of Thomaston Mills work in the plant during the late 1990s. Thomaston Mills was a major employer in Upson County from its beginning in 1899 until 2001, when the company declared bankruptcy.

Courtesy of Thomaston-Upson Archives

Banning Mill

Banning Mill

Banning Mill, initially known as Bowen's Mill, was founded along Snake Creek in Carroll County during the 1840s. Until its closure in 1971, Banning Mill was the oldest continuously operated mill in Georgia.

Photograph by Ed Schipul

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Callaway Mills Strike

Callaway Mills Strike

Mill workers went on strike at Callaway Mills in LaGrange during the General Textile Strike of ’34, along with approximately 44,000 others in Georgia.

Courtesy of Troup County Archives

Georgia State Capitol

Georgia State Capitol

The state capitol building, completed in 1889, features a cornerstone, interior floor and steps, and many walls made of Georgia marble. Marble mined in the state was also used to construct 60 percent of the monuments and the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Georgia Marble Company

Georgia Marble Company

A gang saw at the first plant built by the Georgia Marble Company in Pickens County is pictured circa 1885. The company was founded in 1884 by Samuel Tate, who in the 1830s purchased large tracts of land containing marble in north Georgia.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck285-85.

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Tate and Foremen

Tate and Foremen

Colonel Sam Tate (second from left), the grandson of Georgia Marble Company founder Samuel Tate, poses with a group of foremen at the Pickens County plant, circa 1925. Colonel Sam served as president of the company from 1905 until his death in 1938.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck111-82.

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Georgia Marble Company

Georgia Marble Company

Colonel Sam Tate, the president of the Georgia Marble Company, oversees the production of a marble bench in the Pickens County plant, circa 1930. The marble industry in the state prospered during the early 1930s but suffered losses from 1933 through the rest of the decade.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck250-85.

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Ground Marble Products

Ground Marble Products

Sacks of ground or pulverized marble are produced at the Calcium Products Division of the Georgia Marble Company in Tate (Pickens County), circa 1950. The division was created in 1947 to sell "waste" marble, which is used as filler in paints and plastics. Ground marble products became the company's main product by the late 1980s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #pck253-85.

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Marble Slabs

Marble Slabs

Marble slabs used to make columns during reconstruction work on the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., are cut at the Georgia Marble Company in Pickens County, circa 1958.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # pck043-82.

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Marblehill Quarry

Marblehill Quarry

Workers for the Georgia Marble Company sit for a portrait during the 1920s at the Marblehill Quarry in Pickens County. Marble from Pickens County is reported to have been used in around 60 percent of the monuments in Washington, D.C.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
pck018-82.

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Mills B. Lane Jr.

Mills B. Lane Jr.

Mills B. Lane Jr., a native of Savannah, was president of Citizens and Southern National Bank, based in Atlanta, from 1946 to 1973. During his tenure Lane financed several major projects in the city, including the Atlanta Stadium, and worked to establish peaceful race relations in both Atlanta and Savannah.

Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

An International League baseball game is played at the Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium in 1965, the same year in which the facility was completed. In addition to sporting events, the stadium was used for concerts and other large gatherings before it was destroyed in 1997 to make way for Turner Field (later Center Parc Stadium).

Crawford & Company Headquarters

Crawford & Company Headquarters

The headquarters for Crawford & Company, the world's largest independent insurance adjuster, are located in Atlanta. As of 2007 the company, which comprises the Broadspire, Global Property & Casualty, and Legal Settlement Administration divisions, operates 700 offices in 63 countries.

Courtesy of Crawford & Company

Jim Crawford

Jim Crawford

In 1941 Jim Crawford founded Crawford & Company, an independent insurance claims-adjusting firm, in Columbus. Five years later Crawford developed an internal training program, known today as Crawford University, which helped employees fulfull the company's mission of "Top Quality, Promptly."

Courtesy of Crawford & Company

Catastrophe Adjuster

Catastrophe Adjuster

A catastrophe adjuster for Crawford & Company, an Atlanta-based independent insurance adjusting company, examines damage caused by Hurricane Katrina along the Gulf Coast in 2005. Crawford introduced catastrophe services in the early 1970s.

Courtesy of Crawford & Company

Chateau Elan

Chateau Elan

Chateau Elan, a winery and resort in Braselton, is modeled on a sixteenth-century chateau in France's Loire Valley. The winery, founded in 1981 by Donald and Nancy Panoz, produces a variety of wines from the native muscadine grape, as well as from the vinifera grape, a European species.

Image from Dave Morrison Photography

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Chateau Elan

Chateau Elan

A golfer swings on one of the four golf courses at Chateau Elan, a winery and resort in Braselton. In addition to golf courses, the resort offers a variety of other recreational facilities, as well as an inn, a spa, and several restaurants.

Muscadine Grapes

Muscadine Grapes

The muscadine grape, native to Georgia, is used in the production of several wines, including the award-winning Summer Wine, at Chateau Elan in Braselton.

Courtesy of Gerard Krewer

Heat’n Serve Shrimp

Heat’n Serve Shrimp

Heat 'N' Serve Shrimp is one of many seafood products sold by Brunswick-based King and Prince Seafood. The product was first developed at the company's research and development facility in the 1960s.

From The Story of King & Prince Seafood Corporation, by L. Faulkenberry

Gerald Beach

Gerald Beach

In 1924 Gerald Beach founded King Shrimp Company (later King and Prince Seafood), a seafood wholesaling enterprise based in Brunswick. He bought shrimp from fishermen in Thunderbolt to supplement his own catch for shipment to Chicago and New York City.

From The Story of King & Prince Seafood Corporation, by L. Faulkenberry

King and Prince Seafood

King and Prince Seafood

A freezer building for King and Prince Seafood, based in Brunswick, was built in 1987. Founded in 1924 as a seafood wholesaler, the company produces a variety of frozen food products for both the retail and restaurant markets.

From The Story of King & Prince Seafood Corporation, by L. Faulkenberry

William Bradley Turner

William Bradley Turner

Columbus native William Bradley Turner has been a business, civic, and philanthropic leader through his work with the Synovus Financial Corporation, the W. C. Bradley Company, the Bradley-Turner Foundation, and the Pastoral Institute.

Courtesy of Synovus

The Learning of Love: A Journey toward Servant Leadership

The Learning of Love: A Journey toward Servant Leadership

In his memoir, published in 2000, William Bradley Turner explains his understanding of servant leadership, in which the leader is at the bottom of the organizational structure, supporting all those who carry out the work in a family, business, or community.

Equifax

Equifax

Equifax, one of the largest credit-reporting agencies in the country, collects data on more than 400 million credit holders nationwide. Some of the company's data storage equipment is pictured circa 1978.

Courtesy of Equifax

Equifax

Equifax

One of the country's top credit-reporting agencies, Equifax is one of Georgia's most profitable companies. Its headquarters are located on Peachtree Street in downtown Atlanta.

Courtesy of Equifax

Cator Woolford

Cator Woolford

With his brother Guy, Cator Woolford started the Retail Credit Company, the precursor to Equifax. In the late 1920s Woolford befriended Franklin D. Roosevelt and was one of the founders of the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute. Woolford's former estate in Druid Hills is now the site of the Frazer Center and the Cator Woolford Gardens.

Courtesy of Equifax

Guy Woolford

Guy Woolford

Guy Woolford and his brother, Cator, founded Retail Credit Company, which became Equifax in the 1970s. As a trustee of the Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, Woolford helped to acquire land that would become a buffer for the Fernbank Forest.

Courtesy of Equifax

Pecans

Pecans

In the loamy soil of south Georgia, pecans thrive. Though native to the region, pecan trees did not become a major crop until after the Civil War. Since the 1950s Georgia has led the nation in pecan production, and several businesses in the state, such as the South Georgia Pecan Company, have successfully capitalized on the crop.

Poultry

Poultry

The poultry industry in Georgia, one of the state's most important economic activities, produces 24.6 million pounds of chicken each year. Cagle's, an Atlanta-based company, is one of the top poultry producers in the world.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

J. Mack Robinson

J. Mack Robinson

J. Mack Robinson, a prominent Atlanta businessman and philanthropist, began his career as a district manager for the Atlanta Journal. He subsequently opened finance and insurance offices around the state, and served as director for both the Atlanta American Corporation and First National Bank of Atlanta.

Oil portrait by Thomas V. Nash, Roswell

Porterdale Mill

Porterdale Mill

In 1916 Bibb Manufacturing Company opened the Osprey Mill in Porterdale. Bibb was an important part of Georgia's cotton and textile industry for more than a century and became one of the state's largest employers by the mid-1950s.

Columbus Mill

Columbus Mill

The Columbus Mill was built by the Bibb Manufacturing Company in 1900 on the banks of the Chattahoochee River. Eventually the cotton mill grew to be the largest in the country, supporting a mill town known as "Bibb City."

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Engineering Record, #HAER GA,108-COLM,27-10.

Free Kindergarten

Free Kindergarten

The Bibb Manufacturing Company, founded in Macon in 1876, opened mills in a number of Georgia communities by the end of the nineteenth century. In 1905 the company opened a free kindergarten in Covington, believed to be the first such program in Newton County.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #new142-83.

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Forsyth Mill

Forsyth Mill

After World War II, the Bibb Manufacturing Company opened several new mills in Georgia, including its Forsyth Mill, pictured in the 1970s. During the 1950s, Bibb became one of the largest employers in the state, and by 1966 the company operated fourteen mills in Georgia.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # mnr184.

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Tom’s Foods

Tom’s Foods

Tom's Foods was founded in Columbus in 1925 as the Tom Huston Peanut Company. Purchased by Lance Incorporated in 2005, the company continues to operate its plant in Columbus, producing candy, crackers, and peanut products.

Crown Bottling Works

Crown Bottling Works

The Crown Bottling Works in Valdosta, pictured in the early 1900s, was one of the many plants around the state that bottled and distributed Chero-Cola, later known as Royal Crown (RC) Cola. The beverage was developed in 1905 by Claud Hatcher, a Columbus pharmacist.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
low058.

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Royal Crown Cola

Royal Crown Cola

Founded during the early twentieth century in Columbus, the Royal Crown (RC) Cola Company is today owned by Cadbury Schweppes, which purchased the beverage company in 2000. In the mid-1990s RC Cola held 2.5 percent of the soft-drink market share.

Courtesy of Cadbury Schweppes Americas Beverages

Roddenbery Hardware Company

Roddenbery Hardware Company

The Roddenbery Hardware Company, pictured in 1936, was one of the operations managed by the W. B. Roddenbery Company. From left to right: Tom Herring, clerk; George Faulkner, clerk; Norman E. Pipkin, clerk; Eva Bell, bookkeeper; and Albert C. Roddenbery, manager.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
gra038.

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W. B. Roddenbery Truck

W. B. Roddenbery Truck

Established in Cairo in 1862, the W. B. Roddenbery Company produced a wide variety of syrup, pickles, and peanut products there until 1993. The company's importance to Cairo is demonstrated in the names of the city's high school athletic teams: the Syrupmakers and the Syrupmaids.

Roddenbery Company

Roddenbery Company

The W. B. Roddenbery Company, founded in 1889, operated a plant in Cairo until 2002. The company, now owned by Dean Foods, which is based in Dallas, Texas, produces syrup, pickles, and peanut products.

Georgia Railroad Bank Building

Georgia Railroad Bank Building

The Georgia Railroad Bank Building, known today as the Wells Fargo Building, was erected in 1967 on Broad Street in Augusta to serve as headquarters for the First Railroad and Banking Company of Georgia. The building was designed by architect Robert McCreary.

Courtesy of Augusta Richmond County Historical Society, Reese Library Loose Photographs Collection, Broad Street Series.

Georgia Railroad Bank

Georgia Railroad Bank

The Georgia Railroad Bank and Trust Company in Augusta, pictured circa 1903, was established in Athens in 1833 as the Georgia Railroad Company. Two years later the company began its banking operations, and in 1840 it moved its headquarters to Augusta.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Georgia Railroad General Office

Georgia Railroad General Office

The general office of the Georgia Railroad, located in Augusta, is pictured in 1967. Company headquarters moved from Athens to Augusta in 1840, and the railroad from Augusta to Marthasville (Atlanta) was completed in 1845.

Courtesy of George Lane

Rocky Mountain Hydroelectric Plant

Rocky Mountain Hydroelectric Plant

The upper reservoir of the Rocky Mountain Hydroelectric Plant, located in Floyd County, holds water to be released into a powerhouse that generates electricity. The plant is jointly owned by Oglethorpe Power Corporation and Georgia Power Company.

Courtesy of Oglethorpe Power Corporation

Oglethorpe Power Corporation

Oglethorpe Power Corporation

Oglethorpe Power Corporation, headquartered in DeKalb County, was founded through U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt's Rural Electrification Administration, which was established in 1935. As of 2011, Oglethorpe Power was the nation's largest electric power cooperative, serving 4.1 million customers in Georgia.

Courtesy of Oglethorpe Power Corporation

Talbot Energy Facility

Talbot Energy Facility

The Talbot Energy Facility, located in Talbot County, is one of the plants owned by Oglethorpe Power Corporation, the largest electric power cooperative in the United States. Oglethorpe Power's plants are capable of generating a combined 5,790 megawatts of capacity.

Courtesy of Oglethorpe Power Corporation

Meter Readers

Meter Readers

Employees of Atlanta Gas Light learn to read gas meters in 1942. During World War II, almost half of the company's workforce left to serve in the military, and women were hired to continue providing service to Atlanta Gas Light's customers, which grew to more than 123,000 by 1945.

Courtesy of AGL Resources

AGL Resources Headquarters

AGL Resources Headquarters

Atlanta Gas Light Company, founded in 1856, today is a division of AGL Resources, a distributor of natural gas. Headquartered in Atlanta, AGL Resources operates six utility companies, including Atlanta Gas Light, in six states.

Courtesy of AGL Resources

Union Camp Mill

Union Camp Mill

In 1935 Union Bag and Paper, a New Jersey-based paper and packaging manufacturer, built a mill in Savannah, which became the company's largest facility in the Southeast. In 1956 Union Bag merged with Camp Manufacturing to form Union Camp, which was acquired by International Paper in 1999.

From Union Camp Corporation: A Legacy of Leadership, by W. Craig McClelland

Union Camp

Union Camp

An employee works with rosin at the Union Bag and Paper Company, later Union Camp. Rosin, a distillation of turpentine, is used in the manufacture of paper. A by-product of timbering and naval stores production, the southeast's supply of rosin is drawn largely from loblolly and swamp pines. 

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society, Foltz Photography Studio (Savannah, Ga.), photographs, 1899-1960, #1360-21-03-13.

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Turpentine Still

Turpentine Still

A Thomas County turpentine still produces rosin and turpentine in the early 1900s. Along with other naval stores products, rosin and turpentine were used in the construction and repair of sea vessels.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
tho323.

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Turpentine Still

Turpentine Still

A turpentine still in Thomas County, pictured circa 1895, distills turpentine and rosin from the crude gum harvested from pine trees. The highest grade of turpentine was distilled from longleaf yellow and slash pine varieties.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
tho144a.

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Pine Tree Festival

Pine Tree Festival

A parade float, pictured in the late 1950s, progresses through Swainsboro, the seat of Emanuel County, during the Pine Tree Festival. Forest-related industry was an economic mainstay for the county from the 1870s through the 1960s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
emn067.

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Naval Stores

Naval Stores

Laborers on a Savannah dock prepare barrels of rosin for shipment, circa 1895. From the 1890s until 1945, the ports at Savannah and Brunswick shipped out most of the world's supply of naval stores.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ctm280.

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Ellis Bros. Pecans

Ellis Bros. Pecans

Ellis Bros. Pecans, founded in Vienna in 1944, produces a variety of products from pecans, peanuts, peaches, and cotton. In 1992 the family-owned company received an award from the Cox Family Enterprise Center at Kennesaw State University.

Photograph by Clayton Turner, Shockoe Studios

Ellis Bros. Pecans

Ellis Bros. Pecans

The Ellis Bros. Pecans retail store, located off Interstate 75 in Dooly County, sells such items as nuts, candies, preserves, and relishes to travelers. The original recipes for many of these products were created by Irene Ellis, who founded the company with her husband, Marvin, in 1944.

Image from Lee Coursey

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Bobs Candies Candy Canes

Bobs Candies Candy Canes

A box of Bobs Candies signature product, candy canes.

Courtesy of the Farley's and Sathers Candy Company, Inc.

Bobs’ Candy Company

Bobs’ Candy Company

A 1920s advertisement for Bobs' Candy Company features Anna Louise McCormack, the daughter of company cofounder Bob McCormack. The company was founded in 1919 as the Famous Candy Company by McCormack, Bob Mills, and several other investors. McCormack and Mills later bought out the other investors and in 1924 renamed the company, known today as Bobs Candies.

Courtesy of Farley's and Sathers Candy Company, Inc.

Keller Machine

Keller Machine

Harding Keller, pictured circa 1955, stands beside the Keller Machine, which he invented around 1950 for his brother-in-law Bob McCormack, a cofounder of Bobs Candies. The machine twisted and cut stick candy, allowing for the mass production of the company's signature candy canes and other items.

Courtesy of Farley's and Sathers Candy Company, Inc.

Eagle and Phenix Mills

Eagle and Phenix Mills

In 2003 the W. C. Bradley Company's real estate division began restoring the site of the old Eagle and Phenix Mills in Columbus. Today the restored brick structure has been converted to condominiums.

W. C. Bradley

W. C. Bradley

W. C. Bradley, a Columbus businessman and philanthropist, established Columbus Bank and Trust and the W. C. Bradley Company in the late nineteenth century. In 1919 he joined a group of investors in the purchase of Coca-Cola, and in 1943 he founded the W. C. and Sarah H. Bradley Foundation.

From A History of Columbus, Georgia 1828-1928, by N. Telfair

W. C. Bradley Company

W. C. Bradley Company

The W. C. Bradley Company, pictured circa 1968, was founded in Columbus in 1885. The company was involved in a variety of concerns, including groceries, steamboats, fertilizer, cotton, textiles, and real estate. As of 2005 the organization was Georgia's nineteenth-largest privately held company.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Engineering Record Collection, #HAER GA,108-COLM,23-7.

Cloverdale Dairy

Cloverdale Dairy

A worker processes milk at the Cloverdale Dairy creamery in Atlanta. The facility later became known as Atlanta Dairies, which was purchased in 1993 by Parmalat Dairies. Date of photograph unknown.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #ful0184.

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Dairy Cows

Dairy Cows

In 2005 the state's 81,000 cows produced about 1.4 billion pounds of milk. The commercial dairy industry in Georgia grew rapidly after the Civil War and remains an important sector of the state's economy.

Image from UGA CAES/Extension

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Cow’s Milk Cheese

Cow’s Milk Cheese

Sweet Grass Dairy in Thomasville produces a variety of goat and cow cheeses, including its Green Hill cow's milk cheese. The dairy industry in Georgia generated $254 million in 2000.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Cobb Dairy

Cobb Dairy

Cows are milked by milking machines in H. H. Cobb Sr.'s dairy, circa 1921 in Oconee County. The introduction of milking machines, as well as refrigerators, automobiles, and tractors, promoted the growth of dairy farms around the state during the 1920s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
oco003.

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Cedar Grove Dairy

Cedar Grove Dairy

Cattle at the Cedar Grove Dairy, owned by Julius Wesley Clark, in DeKalb County. Although dairy herds in Georgia declined between World War I and the Great Depression, they increased rapidly during World War II. Date of photograph unknown.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
dek229-85.

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Hooks Dairy Barn

Hooks Dairy Barn

J. H. Hooks's dairy in Washington County, pictured circa 1925, specialized in raising Jersey cows. As the dairy business during the 1920s became increasingly industrialized, concerns over health and sanitation led to legislation requiring inspections and the pasteurization of milk.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
was418.

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Dairy Worker

Dairy Worker

An employee works in the milkroom of an Eatonton dairy in 1952. New advances in dairy technology during the 1950s allowed for higher levels of milk production and more sanitary conditions in the industry.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
put251.

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Sweet Grass Dairy

Sweet Grass Dairy

A worker at Sweet Grass Dairy in Thomasville, located in southwest Georgia, inspects a tank of milk. As of 2006 the state's southern counties were responsible for 50 percent of Georgia's milk production.

Cagle’s Dairy

Cagle’s Dairy

Visitors observe the livestock at Cagle's Dairy, located in Cherokee County. The dairy, which was established in 1951, maintains the oldest continuously operating milk-processing plant in Georgia.

D. Abbott Turner

D. Abbott Turner

D. Abbott Turner, the president and chairman of the board for the W. C. Bradley Company, was a prominent businessman and philanthropist in Columbus. In 1961 Turner established the D. Abbott and Elizabeth Bradley Turner Foundation, known today as the Bradley-Turner Foundation.

Courtesy of Epworth By The Sea

Robert W. Woodruff

Robert W. Woodruff

Robert W. Woodruff, pictured in the mid-1950s, was a prominent Atlanta businessman and philanthropist. Woodruff led the Coca-Cola Company from 1923 until his retirement in 1955 but continued as the company's unofficial leader until his death in 1985. During these years he donated millions of dollars, often anonymously, to charities, schools, and arts organizations.

Coca-Cola Delivery Truck

Coca-Cola Delivery Truck

The Coca-Cola Company and independent bottlers expanded across the country and globally during the 1930s. The company also launched several innovative marketing campaigns, including the introduction of the six-bottle carton, during this decade. Today Coca-Cola is the world's largest manufacturer and distributor of nonalcoholic beverages and syrups.

Courtesy of the Coca-Cola Museum

Robert W. Woodruff

Robert W. Woodruff

Robert W. Woodruff became president of both the Trust Company of Georgia and the Coca-Cola Company in 1923 and eventually became the architect of Coke's worldwide expansion. In later years Woodruff was also Emory University's greatest benefactor. In 1937 he established the Robert W. Woodruff Foundation, a charitable organization.

Image from oaktree_b

McIntosh Combined Cycle Plant

McIntosh Combined Cycle Plant

Located in Effingham County, the McIntosh Combined Cycle Plant began operation in June 2005 under the joint ownership of Savannah Electric and Power Company and Georgia Power, both subsidiaries of the Southern Company. In 2006 Savannah Electric merged into Georgia Power.

Courtesy of Savannah Electric and Power Company

Riverside Plant

Riverside Plant

The generator end of a turbine is moved to the Riverside Plant of the Savannah Power Company in 1913. The plant was built one year earlier to serve the company's approximately 3,400 customers.

Courtesy of Savannah Electric and Power Company

Columbus Iron Works

Columbus Iron Works

W. C. Bradley, of the W. C. Bradley Company, invested in the Columbus Iron Works early in the twentieth century. During the 1940s, the Bradley Company initiated the production of charcoal grills at the iron works to replace the obsolete potbellied stoves formerly produced at the facility.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Engineering Record, #HAER GA, 108-COLM, 22-25.

W. C. Bradley Company

W. C. Bradley Company

The W. C. Bradley Company, based in Columbus, was the state's nineteenth-largest private company in 2005, according to Georgia Trend magazine. The company comprises manufacturing, sales, and real estate divisions.

Image from W.C. Bradley Co.

Bradley Warehouse No. 2

Bradley Warehouse No. 2

A warehouse of the W. C. Bradley Company was located on Front Avenue in Columbus, circa 1960. The company began as a cotton-factoring business in the nineteenth century and expanded into numerous other areas, including fertilizer manufacturing, banks, and iron, during the twentieth century.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Engineering Record, #HAER GA,108-COLM,23-9.

Jesse Hill

Jesse Hill

Jesse Hill was a prominent businessman and civil rights leader in Atlanta. He served as the president and chief executive officer of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, one of the nation's largest Black-owned companies, from 1973 until 1992. He also served on the boards of several leading Atlanta corporations, including Delta Air Lines and SunTrust.

Courtesy of Alexa Benson Henderson

Atlanta Life Insurance

Atlanta Life Insurance

Atlanta Life Insurance Company was founded by Alonzo Herndon, a prominent Black businessman in Atlanta, in 1905. After Herndon's death, leadership of the company passed to his son, Norris Herndon, in 1927 and then to Jesse Hill in 1973. The company is headquartered in Atlanta's Sweet Auburn district.

Photograph by Wally Gobetz 

Jesse and Azira Hill

Jesse and Azira Hill

Jesse Hill, the former leader of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, is pictured in 2001 with his wife, Azira. Hill became active in the civil rights movement upon his arrival in the city in 1949, while living at the YMCA on Butler Street. The street was renamed in his honor in 2001.

Aflac Tower

Aflac Tower

In 1955 John Amos, along with his brothers William and Paul, founded the American Family Life Assurance Company in Columbus. Known today as Aflac, the company grew under Amos's leadership into an international corporation with more than 40 million policyholders in 2003.

Courtesy of Aflac

John Amos

John Amos

John Amos, a cofounder of the insurance company Aflac, made significant contributions in the business, political, and philanthropic arenas of Columbus. In addition to Aflac, Amos founded a television network, the American Family Broadcast Group, and was an active member of the Democratic party at both the local and national levels.

Courtesy of Aflac

Elena and John Amos

Elena and John Amos

In 1989 John Amos, a prominent member of the Columbus business community, celebrated his sixty-fifth birthday with the help of his wife, Elena Diaz-Verson Amos. Five years earlier, the couple successfully campaigned to bring the U.S. Army's School of the Americas to Fort Benning, and they were also active in promoting Latin American studies in Georgia.

Courtesy of Aflac

John B. Amos Cancer Center

John B. Amos Cancer Center

The new free-standing facility for the John B. Amos Cancer Center of the Columbus Regional Healthcare System was dedicated in 2004. The center was established through an endowment provided by Aflac cofounder John Amos in 1990; he died of lung cancer that same year.

Courtesy of Aflac

J. Mack Robinson College of Business

J. Mack Robinson College of Business

The J. Mack Robinson College of Business at Georgia State University was renamed in honor of Atlanta businessman J. Mack Robinson, who donated a $10 million endowment to the school in 1998. In 1994 Robinson and his wife, Nita, were named Philanthropists of the Year by the Georgia chapter of the National Society of Fund-Raising Executives.

Photograph by Kate Howard, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Beaulieu of America

Beaulieu of America

The corporate offices of Beaulieu of America, once one of the nation's largest tufted-carpet manufacturers, were located in Dalton. The company was founded in 1978 by Belgian immigrant Carl Bouckaert.

Courtesy of Beaulieu Group LLC

Styled Carpets

Styled Carpets

Beaulieu of America manufactured a variety of commercial carpet styles under the brand names Cambridge, Bolyu, and Aqua. The company also manufactured and sold polypropylene berber yarns, which it first developed around 1982.

Courtesy of Beaulieu Group LLC

Drawline

Drawline

A piece of machinery known as a "drawline" stretches carpet at Beaulieu of America's Marglen facility in Rome. Beaulieu manufactured carpet from recycled plastic at Marglen.

Courtesy of Beaulieu Group LLC

J & J Industries

J & J Industries

The offices of J & J Industries, one of the largest carpet manufacturers in the industry, are located in Dalton. Founded in 1957, the company specializes today in the manufacture and sale of commercial carpet.

Courtesy of Thomas M. Deaton