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Explore Georgia’s rich music history

From blues and soul to classical and country—our Spotify playlists feature 130+ songs written and performed by Georgians.

Mel Blount

Mel Blount

A Vidalia native, Mel Blount played with the Pittsburgh Steelers throughout the 1970s and early 1980s as part of the team's famous "Steel Curtain" defense. Blount helped the Steelers win four Super Bowls.

Glenn “Pop” Warner

Glenn “Pop” Warner

Glenn "Pop" Warner, shown here in Athens in 1895, coached the University of Georgia football team around the end of the nineteenth century. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
clr093.

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UGA Football Team, 1895

UGA Football Team, 1895

Glenn "Pop" Warner (back row, third from left) coached the University of Georgia Bulldogs for two seasons, from 1895 to 1897. During his second year as coach, Warner led the team to its first undefeated season.

Glenn “Pop” Warner

Glenn “Pop” Warner

One of the most successful coaches in college football history, Glenn "Pop" Warner coached the University of Georgia football team to their first undefeated season in 1896.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Glenn “Pop” Warner

Glenn “Pop” Warner

Glenn "Pop" Warner coached football at the University of Georgia for two seasons, leading the team to its first undefeated season in 1896-97. Warner enjoyed a long collegiate coaching career after leaving Georgia in 1897, and in 1929 he founded the Pop Warner Youth Football League, which exists today as the Pop Warner Little Scholars Program.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division 

Pop Warner Postage Stamp

Pop Warner Postage Stamp

This 1997 postage stamp commemorates Glen "Pop" Warner's career. Warner coached for forty-four years at six different colleges. 

Courtesy of Smithsonian National Postal Museum

1989 National Championship

1989 National Championship

The Georgia Southern Eagles football team celebrates its national championship win in 1989 after a 15-0 season.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Georgia Southern Football

Georgia Southern Football

Defensive back David Young of Georgia Southern University tackles an opposing player from Furman University. The Georgia Southern Eagles won six national championships between 1985 and 2000, making the team the most successful in the NCAA I-AA division.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Erk Russell

Erk Russell

Erskine "Erk" Russell coached the Georgia Southern Eagles to three national championships during his tenure as head coach from 1981 to 1989. Before coaching the Eagles, Russell was the UGA Bulldogs defensive coordinator for seventeen years.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Tracy Ham

Tracy Ham

Tracy Ham, an All-American quarterback, led the Georgia Southern Eagles to national championships in 1985 and 1986.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Georgia Southern Football

Georgia Southern Football

Defensive tackler Freddie Pesqueira (number 44) of Acworth helped Georgia Southern's Eagles win back-to-back national championships in 1999 and 2000.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Chaz Williams

Chaz Williams

Chaz Williams, pictured circa 2003, broke records for touchdowns in the Southern Conference as a quarterback for the Georgia Southern Eagles.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Atlanta Falcons

Atlanta Falcons

Atlanta Falcons player Brian Finneran (left) fights for the ball with Buffalo Bills player Nate Clements in 2005. In 1965 the Falcons franchise came to Atlanta, where the team plays home games at the Mercedes-Benz Stadium.

Tommy Nobis

Tommy Nobis

Tommy Nobis joined the Atlanta Falcons in 1965. A graduate of the University of Texas, Nobis won rookie-of-the-year honors after the team's inaugural season in Atlanta in 1966-67.

Bartkowski and Bennett

Bartkowski and Bennett

Atlanta Falcons quarterback Steve Bartkowski practices under the guidance of head coach Leeman Bennett. Bennett joined the franchise in 1977 and led the team to three play-offs between 1978 and 1981.

Dan Reeves

Dan Reeves

Dan Reeves, head coach of the Atlanta Falcons from 1997 to 2003, observes warm-ups before a 1999 game in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In 1998 Reeves led the team to its first Super Bowl, which the Falcons lost to the Denver Broncos.

Matt Ryan and Mike Smith

Matt Ryan and Mike Smith

Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan (left) stands with head coach Mike Smith. Both joined the Falcons in 2008 and led the franchise to a winning season and the NFC South division title. Smith left the Falcons in 2014.

Herschel Walker

Herschel Walker

Herschel Walker played for the University of Georgia Bulldogs from 1980 to 1982, before beginning his professional career. He won the Heisman Trophy in 1982.

Walker and the Heisman Trophy

Walker and the Heisman Trophy

Herschel Walker, considered to be one of the best college football players in history, won the Heisman Trophy in 1982 and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1999. After playing for the University of Georgia from 1980 to 1982, Walker played professional football for the New Jersey Generals, Dallas Cowboys, Minnesota Vikings, Philadelphia Eagles, and New York Giants.

Bobby Dodd

Bobby Dodd

Bobby Dodd was the head coach of the Georgia Tech football team from 1945 to 1966. In addition to coaching the Yellow Jackets to the 1952 national championship, Dodd is remembered for leading the team in a thirty-one-game winning streak from 1945 to 1966. He is the first man to be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as both a player and a coach.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Bobby Dodd Stadium

Bobby Dodd Stadium

Bobby Dodd Stadium, named for former head coach Bobby Dodd, was built in 1913 by students at Georgia Tech and is today the oldest on-campus stadium in NCAA Division I-A football. Renovated in 2003, the stadium is home to the Georgia Tech football team.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Bobby Ross

Bobby Ross

Bobby Ross, a successful football coach at both the collegiate and professional levels, poses with Georgia Tech's 1990 national championship trophy. Ross served as head football coach for the Yellow Jackets from 1987 to 1991.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

1990 National Championship

1990 National Championship

The Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, coached by Bobby Ross, beat the Nebraska Cornhuskers in 1990 to secure their fourth national championship in NCAA Division I-A football.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Bobby Ross

Bobby Ross

Bobby Ross began his long coaching career after graduating from Virginia Military Institute in 1959. After more than forty years of collegiate and professional coaching, including five years at Georgia Tech, Bobby Ross retired in 2000. He returned to the sport in 2003 as the head coach for the United States Military Academy at West Point.

Photograph by U.S. Army

David Greene

David Greene

David Greene, a native of Snellville, set a number of school and SEC records during his tenure as a quarterback for the University of Georgia. The National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame selected Greene as a part of the National Scholar-Athlete Class in 2004, which is awarded for superior athletic ability, academic accomplishment, and leadership.

Photograph by Steve Guyer

Sanford Stadium

Sanford Stadium

Home of the Georgia Bulldogs football team, Sanford Stadium is the second-largest on-campus stadium in the South and the fifth-largest in the nation, with a capacity of 92,020.

Early UGA Football Team

Early UGA Football Team

Members of an early University of Georgia football team gather on the field sometime between 1895 and 1900. The Bulldogs played their first game on January 25, 1892, against Mercer College (later Mercer University).

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
clr146.

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Charley Trippi on the Field

Charley Trippi on the Field

Charley Trippi runs a play with the 1942 University of Georgia football team. The team was declared a national champion after winning the Rose Bowl against the University of Califorinia at Los Angeles.

Uga IV

Uga IV

Uga IV served as the team mascot from 1981 to 1989. Uga IV attended a bowl game every year of his service and he was the first live mascot ever invited to a Heisman Trophy presentation. After his death in 1990, UGA IV was awarded a Georgia varsity letter, the highest honor available to UGA Mascots.

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley

UGA football coach Vince Dooley was named NCAA National Coach of the Year in both 1980 and 1982, and was honored as Southeastern Conference Coach of the Year seven times over his twenty-five year tenure as head coach.

Mark Richt

Mark Richt

Mark Richt became the twenty-fifth head coach for the University of Georgia football team in December 2000. In 2002 he led the Bulldogs to their first SEC championship in twenty years.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Uga VI

Uga VI

Uga VI served as the mascot for the University of Georgia from 1999 until his death in 2008. He made his debut during the UGA vs. South Carolina football game on September 11, 1999. Uga VI took over for his father, Uga V, who retired after serving as mascot for nine years.

Sinkwich Models a Pass

Sinkwich Models a Pass

Frank "Flatfoot" Sinkwich earned the first Heisman Trophy awarded to a southern college player. He brought national recognition to the University of Georgia's football program by taking his team to the 1942 Orange Bowl, Georgia's first postseason appearance.

David Pollack

David Pollack

David Pollack, a defensive end for the University of Georgia Bulldogs from 2001 to 2004, is a native of Snellville. Pollack was named an all-American three times and won several prestigious national awards during his career at Georgia.

Photograph by Phillip Faulkner

Fran Tarkenton

Fran Tarkenton

Fran Tarkenton's offensive unit drew the nicknames "Tarkenton's Raiders" and "Tarkenton's Music Makers." He led the Southeastern Conference in passing completions and set a conference record for completion percentage in 1959, earning him All-SEC quarterback honors. He also led the Georgia Bulldogs to an Orange Bowl victory over Missouri in 1960.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Photographic Services

P. J. Daniels

P. J. Daniels

P. J. Daniels, a running back for the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, makes a play during the 2004-5 season.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

National Championship Trophy

National Championship Trophy

The Georgia Tech football team won this National Championship Trophy in 1990. The team also won national championships in 1917, 1928, and 1952.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

William Alexander

William Alexander

William Alexander began his coaching career at Georgia Tech in 1908, becoming head coach of the football team in 1920. Alexander led the Yellow Jackets to all four major bowl games during his career, as well as to the 1928 national championship.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Fran Tarkenton

Fran Tarkenton

In 1960, his senior season, Tarkenton was the captain of the Georgia squad, led the conference in total offense and in passing, and was named an all-American. He was also selected as an academic all-American, reflecting a strong performance in the classroom to match his athletic achievements.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Photographic Services

John Heisman

John Heisman

The legendary Georgia Institute of Technology football coach John Heisman also served as baseball and basketball coach for the school. Heisman (middle, with megaphone) coached Georgia Tech's baseball team from 1904 through 1917.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ful0157.

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John Heisman

John Heisman

John Heisman was the head football coach at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta from 1904 to 1919. He led Georgia Tech to the first of its four national championships in 1917 and posted a career record of 102-29-7 in sixteen seasons.

From Heroes of the Heisman Trophy, by B. Libby

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley

Of Coach Vince Dooley's six Southeastern Conference championship titles, three came in the 1980s (1980, 1981, and 1982).

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley became the head coach for the University of Georgia football team in 1963. He led the Bulldogs to two Southeastern Conference championships that decade (1966 and 1968).

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley coached the University of Georgia football team (the Bulldogs) for twenty-five years, leading them to the 1980 National Championship. He served as UGA's athletic director from 1979 to 2003, overseeing the rise of Georgia's athletic program to one of the nation's finest.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley worked first as an assistant coach and then as freshman coach at Alabama's Auburn University before accepting the position as head football coach of the University of Georgia Bulldogs in December 1963. 

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley

A passionate Dooley became a fixture on the sidelines at the University of Georgia.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive.

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley

In the hands of Coach Vince Dooley, the UGA Bulldogs suffered only one losing season, in 1977.

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley, selected in 2011 as a Georgia Trustee, adds his name to a list of the original Trustees of the Georgia colony at the induction ceremony in Savannah. The Georgia Trustees honor is bestowed annually by the Georgia Historical Society and the Office of the Governor.

George “Kid” Woodruff

George “Kid” Woodruff

George "Kid" Woodruff coached the University of Georgia football team from 1923 to 1927, bringing the Bulldogs' program to national prominence. UGA's practice fields are named after him.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Information Department

George “Kid” Woodruff

George “Kid” Woodruff

Nicknamed "Kid" because of his small stature, George Woodruff played quarterback from 1907 to 1911 for the University of Georgia Bulldogs. He was captain of the 1911 team.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Information Department

Frank Sinkwich

Frank Sinkwich

Along with his former coach Bill Hartman, Frank Sinkwich chaired the committee to raise funds for construction of UGA's Butts-Mehre Heritage Hall, completed in 1987. His Heisman Trophy is on display at the Butts-Mehre Hall.

Courtesy of UGA Photographic Services

Sinkwich in the Locker Room

Sinkwich in the Locker Room

Frank Sinkwich (No. 21) led Georgia to a 40-26 victory over Texas Christian University at the 1942 Orange Bowl, Georgia's first postseason appearance. His performance has been called one of the best individual performances in Orange Bowl history.

Georgia Bulldogs 1943 Football Team

Georgia Bulldogs 1943 Football Team

In 1943 Frank Sinkwich (far left) shared the backfield with newcomer Charley Trippi (second from left); Sinkwich was switched to the fullback position, with Trippi playing halfback.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Information Department

Charley Trippi Models Passing

Charley Trippi Models Passing

Charles "Charley" Trippi, a University of Georgia halfback from 1941 to 1943 and 1945 to 1946, is widely considered the finest athlete in Bulldog football history.

Charley Trippi

Charley Trippi

Charley Trippi (right) is welcomed into the University of Georgia "Circle of Honor" in 1996 by Vince Dooley (left).

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Information Department

Charley Trippi

Charley Trippi

After graduating from the University of Georgia Charley Trippi played professionally as a running back with the Chicago Cardinals for nine seasons, winning a world championship his rookie year (1947).

Wally Butts

Wally Butts

Wally Butts Jr. coached the University of Georgia football team from 1939 to 1960, leading the Bulldogs to four Southeastern Conference (SEC) titles, one undefeated season, and eight bowl games.