Beau Jack

Sidney Walker, 1921-2000

Ty Cobb

1886-1961

Bobby Dodd

1908-1988

Dot Kirby

1920-2000

Earl Mann

1904-1990

Bob Montag

1923-2005

Nap Rucker

1884-1970

Rudy York

1913-1970

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Julius Jenkins

Julius Jenkins

Georgia Southern University player Julius Jenkins is the basketball team's all-time top scorer, with 1,870 points during his college career.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Jeff Sanders

Jeff Sanders

Georgia Southern basketball player Jeff Sanders (jersey number 42) is one of the university's best-known players. After excelling on the collegiate level during the late 1980s, Sanders went on to play for a few teams in the NBA, including the Atlanta Hawks.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Johnny Mills

Johnny Mills

Johnny Mills holds the Georgia Southern University basketball records for best career average and best season average for points scored. He played for the Eagles in the early 1970s.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Michael Curry

Michael Curry

Michael Curry played basketball for Georgia Southern University from 1986 to 1990. One of the Eagles' best-known players, Curry broke records for the school before going on to play for the NBA.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Sherry Smith

Sherry Smith

Between 1911 and 1927 native Georgian Sherry Smith played for fourteen years in the major leagues. His team played in the World Series twice. Later in his career, Smith returned to Georgia to coach for the Macon Peaches in the Southeastern League.

Willard Nixon

Willard Nixon

Baseball player Willard Nixon is pictured in 1951 as a pitcher for the Boston Red Sox. He was especially effective pitching against the New York Yankees and earned the nickname "Yankee Killer."

Courtesy of Boston Red Sox

Atlanta Southern League Team

Atlanta Southern League Team

The Atlanta team of the Southern League is pictured circa 1890. The Southern League, founded in Atlanta by Henry W. Grady in 1885, was the first professional minor league baseball association. The league collapsed several times before disbanding for good in 1899.

Emory University Soccer

Emory University Soccer

Emory University formed Georgia's first intercollegiate men's soccer program in 1958. At the time, most instructors in Emory's physical education department did not know the rules of the game.

Courtesy of Emory University Public Affairs

Atlanta Chiefs

Atlanta Chiefs

The 1968 lineup for the Atlanta Chiefs of the North American Soccer League included, from front to back, Vic Crowe, Freddie Mwila, Gordon Ferry, Brian Hughes, Ray Bloomfield, Emment Kapengwe, Ron Newman, John Cocking, Graham Newton, Vic Rouse, and Peter McParland. The original team folded in 1972, but a second incarnation of the Chiefs competed in the NASL from 1979 to 1981.

Pele

Pele

Soccer star Pele in Atlanta for a match against the Atlanta Chiefs in1968. Pele scored three times in the game, and the Santos defeated the Atlanta Chiefs, six to two. Pele, who later played in the North American Soccer League for the New York Cosmos, is seen as integral to the growth of American soccer.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive.

Soccer in the Streets

Soccer in the Streets

Soccer in the Streets began in Atlanta in 1989 to bring soccer and other activities to disadvantaged youth in urban areas. The program exists in cities nationwide.

Photograph from the Atlanta Beltline

Larry Nelson

Larry Nelson

Professional golfer Larry Nelson has won ten PGA Tour events and nineteen Champions Tour events. In 2000 the Marietta resident was named Senior Player of the Year.

Courtesy of Georgia Golf Hall of Fame

Mel Blount

Mel Blount

A Vidalia native, Mel Blount played with the Pittsburgh Steelers throughout the 1970s and early 1980s as part of the team's famous "Steel Curtain" defense. Blount helped the Steelers win four Super Bowls.

Atlanta Thrashers

Atlanta Thrashers

In their first preseason game of 2006-7, the Thrashers beat the Florida Panthers six to three. In this photo, the Thrashers' Ilya Kovalchuk (right) scores his second goal of the night.

Atlanta Thrashers

Atlanta Thrashers

In their final home game of the 2005-6 season on April 15, the Thrashers beat the Boston Bruins four to three. This photo shows the Atlanta team celebrating its fourth and game-winning goal.

State Farm Arena

State Farm Arena

State Farm Arena (formerly Phillips Arena), in the heart of downtown Atlanta, was home to the National Hockey League's Atlanta Thrashers from 1999 to 2011. The venue hosts concerts and other sporting events and can seat as many as 18,750 people. 

Photograph by Doug Waldron 

Atlanta Crackers Baseball Diamond

Atlanta Crackers Baseball Diamond

The Atlanta Crackers (1901-1965) played at Ponce de Leon Ballpark in their hometown.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Lane Brothers Commercial Photographers Photographic Collection, 1920-1976.

Nat Peeples

Nat Peeples

In 1954 Nat Peeples, a native of Memphis, Tennessee, played two games with the Atlanta Crackers, a minor league baseball team affiliated with the Southern Association. He was the first and only Black player to be recruited by a team in that organization.

Photograph from NBC

Atlanta Crackers, 1950

Atlanta Crackers, 1950

Members of the 1950 Atlanta Crackers team carry the Southern Association pennant into Ponce de Leon Ballpark. The Crackers, a minor league team, won seventeen league championships between the team's formation in 1901 and its final season in 1965.

Atlanta Crackers, 1960

Atlanta Crackers, 1960

By 1960 the Atlanta Crackers, a minor league baseball team, had lost a number of fans to such new attractions as television. In 1962 the team won its final championship, the Junior World Series, before playing its final season in 1965.

Atlanta Crackers

Atlanta Crackers

The Atlanta Crackers, a minor league team in the Southern Association, formed in 1901 under the leadership of Charles Abner Powell. The origin of the team's name is unknown, although several theories exist.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Atlanta History Photograph Collection, #
VIS 170.173.001.

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Atlanta Crackers

Atlanta Crackers

The Atlanta Crackers club dominated the Southern Association until the league's demise in 1961. Ted Cieslak, at bat, played in the major leagues during World War II. 

Bryan “Bitsy” Grant

Bryan “Bitsy” Grant

Bryan "Bitsy" Grant, a native of Atlanta, was a champion tennis player during the 1930s. In both 1935 and 1936, he was ranked as the third best player in the world, and he won the U.S. Championships (later the U.S. Open) three times.

Glenn “Pop” Warner

Glenn “Pop” Warner

Glenn "Pop" Warner, shown here in Athens in 1895, coached the University of Georgia football team around the end of the nineteenth century. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1951.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
clr093.

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UGA Football Team, 1895

UGA Football Team, 1895

Glenn "Pop" Warner (back row, third from left) coached the University of Georgia Bulldogs for two seasons, from 1895 to 1897. During his second year as coach, Warner led the team to its first undefeated season.

Glenn “Pop” Warner

Glenn “Pop” Warner

One of the most successful coaches in college football history, Glenn "Pop" Warner coached the University of Georgia football team to their first undefeated season in 1896.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Glenn “Pop” Warner

Glenn “Pop” Warner

Glenn "Pop" Warner coached football at the University of Georgia for two seasons, leading the team to its first undefeated season in 1896-97. Warner enjoyed a long collegiate coaching career after leaving Georgia in 1897, and in 1929 he founded the Pop Warner Youth Football League, which exists today as the Pop Warner Little Scholars Program.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division 

Pop Warner Postage Stamp

Pop Warner Postage Stamp

This 1997 postage stamp commemorates Glen "Pop" Warner's career. Warner coached for forty-four years at six different colleges. 

Courtesy of Smithsonian National Postal Museum

Cecil Travis

Cecil Travis

A native of Clayton County, Cecil Travis earned honors as both a hitter and a fielder during his major league baseball career with the Washington Senators, from 1934 to 1941. In 1975 he was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame.

Photograph by the Boston Public Library

Nap Rucker

Nap Rucker

Nap Rucker, pitcher for the Brooklyn Superbas (later Brooklyn Dodgers) from 1907 to 1916, winds up a throw. Rucker, a Georgia native, is often credited with the invention of the knuckleball in 1905, along with Augusta native Eddie Cicotte.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Nap Rucker

Nap Rucker

Nap Rucker, a native of Crabapple, pitched for the Brooklyn Superbas (later the Brooklyn Dodgers) throughout his career in major league baseball, from 1907 to 1916. Rucker is pictured on a baseball card issued in 1911 by the American Tobacco Company.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Benjamin K. Edwards Collection, #LC-USZC2-1363.

1989 National Championship

1989 National Championship

The Georgia Southern Eagles football team celebrates its national championship win in 1989 after a 15-0 season.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Georgia Southern Football

Georgia Southern Football

Defensive back David Young of Georgia Southern University tackles an opposing player from Furman University. The Georgia Southern Eagles won six national championships between 1985 and 2000, making the team the most successful in the NCAA I-AA division.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Erk Russell

Erk Russell

Erskine "Erk" Russell coached the Georgia Southern Eagles to three national championships during his tenure as head coach from 1981 to 1989. Before coaching the Eagles, Russell was the UGA Bulldogs defensive coordinator for seventeen years.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Tracy Ham

Tracy Ham

Tracy Ham, an All-American quarterback, led the Georgia Southern Eagles to national championships in 1985 and 1986.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Georgia Southern Football

Georgia Southern Football

Defensive tackler Freddie Pesqueira (number 44) of Acworth helped Georgia Southern's Eagles win back-to-back national championships in 1999 and 2000.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Chaz Williams

Chaz Williams

Chaz Williams, pictured circa 2003, broke records for touchdowns in the Southern Conference as a quarterback for the Georgia Southern Eagles.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern Athletic Media Relations

Stribling v. Dempsey

Stribling v. Dempsey

Young Stribling (left), a heavyweight boxer, trains in North Carolina with Jack Dempsey, circa 1930. Stribling was well known across his home state of Georgia for his civic involvement, which included service as a lieutenant in the Army Air Reserve Corps.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Tracy O'Neal Photographic Collection.

Young Stribling

Young Stribling

Young Stribling, a native of Bainbridge, was a well-known professional boxer. His career began in 1920 with his first professional fight in Atlanta and continued until 1933, when he died in a motorcycle accident in Macon. Stribling fought in more than 285 professional fights, winning 221 of the bouts.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Training Camp

Training Camp

Young Stribling, a boxing champion during the 1920s and early 1930s, trains in North Carolina for a match against Paul Berlenbach. A Georgia native, Stribling was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1965.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Tracy O'Neal Photographic Collection.

Lou Hudson

Lou Hudson

Lou Hudson (left) of the Atlanta Hawks plays against the Buffalo Braves, circa 1970. Known by teammates as "Super Lou" or "Sweet Lou," Hudson is one of only three Hawks players to have his number, twenty-three, retired by the team.

Atlanta Hawks

Atlanta Hawks

Atlanta Hawks player Al Harrington (left) attempts a rebound during a game with the Phoenix Suns at Philips Arena (later State Farm Arena) in 2006. The Hawks franchise moved to Atlanta from St. Louis, Missouri, in 1968.

Dominique Wilkins

Dominique Wilkins

Dominique Wilkins of the Atlanta Hawks scores against the Indiana Pacers, circa 1985. Known as the "human highlight film," Wilkins joined the Hawks in 1982 and ten years later became the team's all-time leading scorer.

Atlanta Hawks

Atlanta Hawks

Jon Koncak (left) and Duane Ferrell (right) of the Atlanta Hawks attempt to block a shot made by Glen Rice of the Miami Heat in 1992.

Lon Kruger

Lon Kruger

Lon Kruger coaches during an Atlanta Hawks home game, played in October 2000 at Philips Arena (later State Farm Arena). Kruger served as the head coach for the Hawks from 2000 to 2002.

Harry the Hawk

Harry the Hawk

Two members of the dance squad for the Atlanta Hawks pose with the team mascot, Harry the Hawk. The twenty-member dance team performs at all the Hawks' home games, which are played in State Farm Arena.

Hubie Brown

Hubie Brown

Hubie Brown coaches the Atlanta Hawks on January 3, 1979. Brown served as head coach of the Hawks from 1976 until 1981, winning the NBA's coach of the year award in 1978.

Atlanta Falcons

Atlanta Falcons

Atlanta Falcons player Brian Finneran (left) fights for the ball with Buffalo Bills player Nate Clements in 2005. In 1965 the Falcons franchise came to Atlanta, where the team plays home games at the Mercedes-Benz Stadium.

Tommy Nobis

Tommy Nobis

Tommy Nobis joined the Atlanta Falcons in 1965. A graduate of the University of Texas, Nobis won rookie-of-the-year honors after the team's inaugural season in Atlanta in 1966-67.

Bartkowski and Bennett

Bartkowski and Bennett

Atlanta Falcons quarterback Steve Bartkowski practices under the guidance of head coach Leeman Bennett. Bennett joined the franchise in 1977 and led the team to three play-offs between 1978 and 1981.

Dan Reeves

Dan Reeves

Dan Reeves, head coach of the Atlanta Falcons from 1997 to 2003, observes warm-ups before a 1999 game in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In 1998 Reeves led the team to its first Super Bowl, which the Falcons lost to the Denver Broncos.

Matt Ryan and Mike Smith

Matt Ryan and Mike Smith

Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan (left) stands with head coach Mike Smith. Both joined the Falcons in 2008 and led the franchise to a winning season and the NFC South division title. Smith left the Falcons in 2014.

Herschel Walker

Herschel Walker

Herschel Walker played for the University of Georgia Bulldogs from 1980 to 1982, before beginning his professional career. He won the Heisman Trophy in 1982.

Walker and the Heisman Trophy

Walker and the Heisman Trophy

Herschel Walker, considered to be one of the best college football players in history, won the Heisman Trophy in 1982 and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1999. After playing for the University of Georgia from 1980 to 1982, Walker played professional football for the New Jersey Generals, Dallas Cowboys, Minnesota Vikings, Philadelphia Eagles, and New York Giants.

Nancy Lopez

Nancy Lopez

Nancy Lopez competes while a student-athlete at the University of Tulsa in Oklahoma. Lopez enrolled at the university in 1974 on a golf scholarship, and in 1976 she was named an all-American. The following year she left school to begin her professional career.

Courtesy of Tulsa Athletic Media Relations

Nancy Lopez

Nancy Lopez

Nancy Lopez is one of the most successful golfers in the Ladies Professional Golf Association, with career tournament winnings of more than $5 million. Inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame in 1998, Lopez sponsors charity golf tournaments in Albany and Stockbridge each year.

Courtesy of Georgia Golf Hall of Fame

Walt Frazier

Walt Frazier

Walt Frazier, a guard for the New York Knicks, plays in a 1969 game against the Seattle SuperSonics. Frazier, a native of Atlanta, played for the Knicks from 1967 until 1976, during which time he often led the team in both assists and scoring.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Women’s Swim Team

Women’s Swim Team

The 2005-6 women's swim team at the University of Georgia pose at the beginning of the season. In 2005 the team won an NCAA championship, the fourth in the team's history.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications

Ramsey Student Center

Ramsey Student Center

The Ramsey Student Center for Physical Activities has been home to the University of Georgia swimming and diving teams since 1995. The center's swimming facilities are housed in the Gabrielsen Natatorium, which features a 50-meter competition pool, a diving pool, and seats for 2,000 spectators.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Photographic Services

1952 Men’s Swim Team

1952 Men’s Swim Team

The men's swim team at the University of Georgia won the SEC conference championship in 1952 for the second consecutive year. The team would bring home another championship in 1955.

Courtesy of UGA Sports Communications

Bobby Dodd

Bobby Dodd

Bobby Dodd was the head coach of the Georgia Tech football team from 1945 to 1966. In addition to coaching the Yellow Jackets to the 1952 national championship, Dodd is remembered for leading the team in a thirty-one-game winning streak from 1945 to 1966. He is the first man to be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as both a player and a coach.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Bobby Dodd Stadium

Bobby Dodd Stadium

Bobby Dodd Stadium, named for former head coach Bobby Dodd, was built in 1913 by students at Georgia Tech and is today the oldest on-campus stadium in NCAA Division I-A football. Renovated in 2003, the stadium is home to the Georgia Tech football team.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Tommy Aaron

Tommy Aaron

Tommy Aaron, a native of Gainesville, won the Master's Tournament in Augusta in 1973. He was later inducted into both the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame and the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame. 

Tommy Aaron

Tommy Aaron

Tommy Aaron became an amateur golf champion during his high school years in the 1950s. After turning professional in 1961, Aaron became one of the Professional Golf Association's top money earners. In 1969 and 1973 he played for the Ryder Cup team.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive.

Rudy York and Roy Henderson

Rudy York and Roy Henderson

Rudy York (left) sits with teammate Roy Henderson in 1930, when the two played together on the company team for the textile mill in Atco. York later went on to play professionally for the Detroit Tigers.

Photograph from Collection of Bartow History Center, Cartersville

Rudy York

Rudy York

Rudy York began his career with the Detroit Tigers in 1933, when he was only nineteen. After rising through the ball club's minor league system, York joined the Tigers' major league team in 1937, with whom he remained through 1945.

Rudy York

Rudy York

Rudy York examines a baseball bat in the late 1960s with three young boys wearing Atlanta Crackers jerseys.

Photograph from Collection of Bartow History Center, Cartersville

Davis Love III

Davis Love III

Davis Love III, a professional golfer who makes his home in Sea Island, played for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1983 to 1985. He was named an all-American three times, as well as an all-Atlantic Coast Conference golfer, during his collegiate career.

Courtesy of UNC Athletic Communications

Davis Love III

Davis Love III

Davis Love III, a resident of Sea Island, was inducted into the Georgia Golf Hall of Fame in 2001. A professional golfer since 1985, Love was listed in 2004 as the fourth all-time money winner on the Professional Golf Association tour.

Courtesy of Georgia Golf Hall of Fame

Edwin Moses

Edwin Moses

After retiring from his career as a track runner, Edwin Moses began to campaign against steroid use. He also served on the International Olympic Committee and worked in support of the Goodwill Games and the Special Olympics.

Edwin Moses

Edwin Moses

Edwin Moses competes at the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, Korea. Moses shares the honor of being a two-time Olympic champion of the 400-meter hurdles with only one other man. This distinction is especially remarkable because his two wins occurred eight years apart.

Evander Holyfield

Evander Holyfield

Evander Holyfield, the only boxer to become the heavyweight champion of the world four times, trained for his second title fight at the Atlanta gym of Lee Haney, an eight-time Mr. Olympia.

Photograph by John Kloepper

Evander Holyfield

Evander Holyfield

Evander Holyfield poses with his championship belts in 1990, after becoming the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world.

Evander Holyfield

Evander Holyfield

Aside from boxing, Evander Holyfield is involved in various religious and philanthropic activities, including a college fund for minority students and a family community center. 

Photograph by Glenn Francis 

Spud Chandler

Spud Chandler

Despite being interrupted repeatedly by injuries, Spud Chandler's career was exceptional. With the highest winning percentage in major league history among experienced pitchers, and having pitched for six world championship wins, Spud Chandler received the American League's Most Valuable Player award in 1943 and is a member of the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications Office

Spud Chandler

Spud Chandler

As a young boy, Spud Chandler, shown here in his Yankees uniform between 1937 and 1947, was a fan of the New York team. While at the University of Georgia, he rejected offers from professional football teams and from other professional baseball teams so that he could play for the Yankees, with whom he spent his entire pitching career.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications Office

Final Four Team

Final Four Team

The UGA men's basketball team, holding its third-place NCAA trophy, poses with Uga, the school mascot, on the tarmac of the airport in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In 1983 the team played in its first NCAA tournament, advancing to the Final Four before losing to North Carolina State University, the eventual champion.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications Office

1983 Final Four

1983 Final Four

The Bulldogs' progression to the 1983 NCAA Final Four is a highlight in the history of the men's basketball program at the University of Georgia. The team, playing in its first NCAA tournament, beat the University of North Carolina to make it into the semifinals.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications Office

D. A. Layne

D. A. Layne

D. A. Layne, a former UGA guard from Marietta, drives down the court during a 2000-2001 season game. Layne, a consistent shooter, broke a school record when he scored ninety-one three-pointers in a single season.

Courtesy of James Hipple

Tubby Smith

Tubby Smith

Orlando "Tubby" Smith coached the men's basketball team at the University of Georgia from 1995 to 1997. During his tenure, Smith led the Bulldogs to the NCAA Sweet Sixteen tournament.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications Office

Dennis Felton

Dennis Felton

Dennis Felton, the former head coach at Western Kentucky University, assumed the head coaching position for the UGA men's basketball team in 2003.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications Office

Jarvis and Jonas Hayes

Jarvis and Jonas Hayes

Jarvis and Jonas Hayes, identical twins and fan favorites, played together for the UGA men's basketball team during the 2002 and 2003 seasons. Jonas played an additional season for the Bulldogs in 2004 after Jarvis left to play professionally for the Washington Wizards.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications Office

1999 Gym Dogs

1999 Gym Dogs

The University of Georgia gymnastics team won its fifth national title in 1999. The Gym Dogs, coached by Suzanne Yoculan, won their first national title in 1987.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications

2005 Gym Dogs

2005 Gym Dogs

The University of Georgia gymnastics team, known as the Gym Dogs, won the national title in 2005 for the sixth time in its history. The 2005 team also received a total of seventeen all-American honors.

Photograph by John Kelley

Suzanne Yoculan

Suzanne Yoculan

Suzanne Yoculan became the head coach for the University of Georgia Gym Dogs in 1984, and she retired in 2009. Named the NCAA coach of the year five times during her tenure at Georgia, Yoculan led the team to ten national titles and sixteen Southeastern Conference titles.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications

Gym Dogs at Home

Gym Dogs at Home

Pre-meet entertainment takes place in Stegeman Coliseum, where home meets of the University of Georgia gymnastics team are held. Student support for the Gym Dogs is among the highest of any college gymnastics team in the nation, and home meets regularly sell out.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Sports Communications

Bobby Ross

Bobby Ross

Bobby Ross, a successful football coach at both the collegiate and professional levels, poses with Georgia Tech's 1990 national championship trophy. Ross served as head football coach for the Yellow Jackets from 1987 to 1991.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

1990 National Championship

1990 National Championship

The Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, coached by Bobby Ross, beat the Nebraska Cornhuskers in 1990 to secure their fourth national championship in NCAA Division I-A football.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Bobby Ross

Bobby Ross

Bobby Ross began his long coaching career after graduating from Virginia Military Institute in 1959. After more than forty years of collegiate and professional coaching, including five years at Georgia Tech, Bobby Ross retired in 2000. He returned to the sport in 2003 as the head coach for the United States Military Academy at West Point.

Photograph by U.S. Army

David Greene

David Greene

David Greene, a native of Snellville, set a number of school and SEC records during his tenure as a quarterback for the University of Georgia. The National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame selected Greene as a part of the National Scholar-Athlete Class in 2004, which is awarded for superior athletic ability, academic accomplishment, and leadership.

Photograph by Steve Guyer

Sanford Stadium

Sanford Stadium

Home of the Georgia Bulldogs football team, Sanford Stadium is the second-largest on-campus stadium in the South and the fifth-largest in the nation, with a capacity of 92,020.

Early UGA Football Team

Early UGA Football Team

Members of an early University of Georgia football team gather on the field sometime between 1895 and 1900. The Bulldogs played their first game on January 25, 1892, against Mercer College (later Mercer University).

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
clr146.

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Charley Trippi on the Field

Charley Trippi on the Field

Charley Trippi runs a play with the 1942 University of Georgia football team. The team was declared a national champion after winning the Rose Bowl against the University of Califorinia at Los Angeles.

Uga IV

Uga IV

Uga IV served as the team mascot from 1981 to 1989. Uga IV attended a bowl game every year of his service and he was the first live mascot ever invited to a Heisman Trophy presentation. After his death in 1990, UGA IV was awarded a Georgia varsity letter, the highest honor available to UGA Mascots.

Vince Dooley

Vince Dooley

UGA football coach Vince Dooley was named NCAA National Coach of the Year in both 1980 and 1982, and was honored as Southeastern Conference Coach of the Year seven times over his twenty-five year tenure as head coach.

Mark Richt

Mark Richt

Mark Richt became the twenty-fifth head coach for the University of Georgia football team in December 2000. In 2002 he led the Bulldogs to their first SEC championship in twenty years.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Uga VI

Uga VI

Uga VI served as the mascot for the University of Georgia from 1999 until his death in 2008. He made his debut during the UGA vs. South Carolina football game on September 11, 1999. Uga VI took over for his father, Uga V, who retired after serving as mascot for nine years.

Sinkwich Models a Pass

Sinkwich Models a Pass

Frank "Flatfoot" Sinkwich earned the first Heisman Trophy awarded to a southern college player. He brought national recognition to the University of Georgia's football program by taking his team to the 1942 Orange Bowl, Georgia's first postseason appearance.

David Pollack

David Pollack

David Pollack, a defensive end for the University of Georgia Bulldogs from 2001 to 2004, is a native of Snellville. Pollack was named an all-American three times and won several prestigious national awards during his career at Georgia.

Photograph by Phillip Faulkner

Fran Tarkenton

Fran Tarkenton

Fran Tarkenton's offensive unit drew the nicknames "Tarkenton's Raiders" and "Tarkenton's Music Makers." He led the Southeastern Conference in passing completions and set a conference record for completion percentage in 1959, earning him All-SEC quarterback honors. He also led the Georgia Bulldogs to an Orange Bowl victory over Missouri in 1960.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Photographic Services

Alexander Memorial Coliseum

Alexander Memorial Coliseum

Alexander Memorial Coliseum, nicknamed the Thrillerdome, in Atlanta is named for former men's coach William Alexander, who revitalized Georgia Tech's basketball program in 1919. The coliseum has been the home of the Yellow Jackets since 1956.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Georgia Tech Basketball

Georgia Tech Basketball

Luke Schenscher attempts to score for the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets during the 2004-5 basketball season.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Jarret Jack

Jarret Jack

Jarret Jack dribbles down the court for the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, coached by Paul Hewitt, during a 2004-5 season game.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

John “Whack” Hyder

John “Whack” Hyder

John "Whack" Hyder coached the Georgia Tech men's basketball team during the 1960s and 1970s. He led the team to its first NCAA tournament game in 1960 and continued over the next two decades to build up the strength of the program.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Bobby Cremins

Bobby Cremins

Bobby Cremins coached the Georgia Tech men's basketball team to the Atlantic Coast Conference championship in 1985. The all-time winningest coach for the Yellow Jackets, Cremins served as head coach of the team from 1981 to 2000.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Isma’il Muhammad

Isma’il Muhammad

Isma'il Muhammad, a player for the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets in the 2004-5 season, dunks the ball during a game. Georgia Tech has produced a number of outstanding players, including dozens who were drafted by professional teams.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

P. J. Daniels

P. J. Daniels

P. J. Daniels, a running back for the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, makes a play during the 2004-5 season.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

National Championship Trophy

National Championship Trophy

The Georgia Tech football team won this National Championship Trophy in 1990. The team also won national championships in 1917, 1928, and 1952.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

William Alexander

William Alexander

William Alexander began his coaching career at Georgia Tech in 1908, becoming head coach of the football team in 1920. Alexander led the Yellow Jackets to all four major bowl games during his career, as well as to the 1928 national championship.

Courtesy of Georgia Tech Sports Information

Cheryl Haworth

Cheryl Haworth

Cheryl Haworth trains in 2004 at the Anderson/Cohen Weightlifting Center in her hometown of Savannah. Haworth has won numerous awards, including a bronze Olympic medal in 2000, during her weightlifting career.

Howard’s Gym

Howard’s Gym

Weight lifters train at Howard's Gym, which was opened in Savannah by Howard Cohen in 1952. Cohen, a fifteen-time Georgia lightweight champion and the holder of the 1955 Junior National featherweight title, has trained many weight-lifting and bodybuilding champions in Georgia.

Photograph by Stephen Bernerd. Courtesy of Savannah Morning News

Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson, a heavyweight champion from Toccoa known as "the Dixie Derrick," lifts two beauty pageant contestants in the 1950s or 1960s. In 1955 Anderson became the first lifter to press more than 400 pounds.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
clq113.

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Cheryl Haworth

Cheryl Haworth

Cheryl Haworth rests during a 2004 training session in Savannah. In 1998, at age fifteen, Haworth became the youngest lifter to hold senior American records.

Bob Montag

Bob Montag

Bob Montag, an outfielder for the Atlanta Crackers during the 1950s, was a fan favorite who hit 113 home runs for the team before his retirement in 1959.

Courtesy of Bob Montag

Dominique Wilkins

Dominique Wilkins

Dominique Wilkins, who began his career at the University of Georgia, was one of the most popular players for the Atlanta Hawks from 1982 until 1994, when he was traded to the Los Angeles Clippers. Wilkins later played for the Boston Celtics, San Antonio Spurs, and Orlando Magic, as well as for professional teams in Greece and Italy.

Dominique Wilkins

Dominique Wilkins

Former Atlanta Hawks player Dominique Wilkins, pictured in 2000 at Philips Arena (later State Farm Arena) in Atlanta, returned to the team in an administrative capacity in 2001. In 2004 he was named vice president of the Hawks franchise and was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame.

NASCAR

NASCAR

The FedEx 400 is a part of the Sprint Cup Series.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Roy Hall

Roy Hall

Roy Hall was one of the most important early stock car racers, memorialized in the Jim Croce song "Rapid Roy, That Stock Car Boy." He dominated the stock-car racing scene in the Southeast and Midwest in the late 1930s and early 1940s.

Georgia Automobile Racing Hall of Fame Association Incorporated

Red Vogt and Red Byron

Red Vogt and Red Byron

Cars prepared by the Atlanta garage owner and mechanic Red Vogt (left) dominated NASCAR's early years and launched the careers of such legends as Red Byron (right), the 1949 NASCAR Grand National champion.

Georgia Automobile Racing Hall of Fame Association Incorporated

Bill Elliott

Bill Elliott

Bill Elliott is one of the most successful drivers in the history of NASCAR Winston Cup racing.

Photograph by Ted Van Pelt

Red Vogt

Red Vogt

Atlanta garage owner and mechanic Red Vogt provided many of the early stock car racers with top-notch cars. Vogt is credited with naming the National Association for Stock Car Racing (NASCAR).

Columbus Speedway Wreck

Columbus Speedway Wreck

A wreck at the Columbus Speedway, circa 1950. The number 8 car was driven by Billy Carden, of Mableton, a successful NASCAR driver.

Georgia Automobile Racing Hall of Fame Association Incorporated

Atlanta Motor Speedway

Atlanta Motor Speedway

Atlanta Motor Speedway fans stand for a restart during the Bass ProShops MBNA 500. The speedway holds a total number of 124,000 permanent seats and 141 luxury suites.

Courtesy of Atlanta Motor Speedway

Fran Tarkenton

Fran Tarkenton

In 1960, his senior season, Tarkenton was the captain of the Georgia squad, led the conference in total offense and in passing, and was named an all-American. He was also selected as an academic all-American, reflecting a strong performance in the classroom to match his athletic achievements.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Photographic Services

Atlanta Braves

Atlanta Braves

The Atlanta Braves play at Turner Field (later Center Parc Stadium) in July 2005.

Photograph by John Ashley

1995 Atlanta Braves

1995 Atlanta Braves

In 1995 the Atlanta Braves defeated the Cleveland Indians and won the World Series. The team that had once been a laughingstock became the world champion of baseball. It was the first time any Georgia sports franchise won a major world championship.

Turner Field

Turner Field

Turner Field was originally built for the 1996 Olympic Games, held in Atlanta. The stadium was renovated and served as the Atlanta Braves' home stadium from 1997-2016. It was redeveloped for Georgia State University in 2017 and later renamed Center Parc Stadium.

Photograph by Valerie 

Phil Niekro

Phil Niekro

Phil Niekro fashioned a long, successful sports career by mastering the knuckleball, the most confounding pitch in the history of baseball. Unlike other pitches, the knuckleball floats with no spin or rotation, then suddenly dips, dives, or swoops. It's almost impossible not only to hit but also for pitchers to control.

Courtesy of the Atlanta National Baseball Club, Inc. Copyright 2003. All rights reserved.

Hank Aaron At Bat

Hank Aaron At Bat

After his first season in the majors (1954), Hank Aaron hit at least twenty home runs a season for the next twenty consecutive seasons, with thirty home runs or more in fifteen of those seasons. The feat remains unmatched today.

Dale Murphy

Dale Murphy

Outfielder Dale Murphy, the most popular player ever to wear an Atlanta Braves uniform, won two consecutive Most Valuable Player awards in 1982 and 1983.