Updated Recently

Christian Science

Christian Science

1 week ago
Alice Walker

Alice Walker

1 week ago
Etowah Mounds

Etowah Mounds

1 week ago

Explore Georgia’s rich music history

From blues and soul to classical and country—our Spotify playlists feature 130+ songs written and performed by Georgians.

American Burying Beetle

American Burying Beetle

The American burying beetle, Nicrophorus americanus, is an endangered species and is no longer found in Georgia. Beetles, order Coleoptera, are the largest group of insects, and thousands of species can be found in Georgia.

Photograph by the Frost Museum

European Honeybees

European Honeybees

European honeybees are not native to Georgia, but records show they arrived in the state by 1743. They were named the state insect in 1975. In addition to creating honey, honeybees pollinate several crops, including blueberries, apples, melons, and gourds.

Photograph by Waugsberg

Bombyx mori

Bombyx mori

An adult silkmoth, Bombyx mori. This species's caterpillar, the mulberry silkworm, has produced silk textiles for millennia. Eighteenth-century Georgia colonists tried and failed to establish a silk industry in Savannah.

Photograph by Nikita

Fire Ant

Fire Ant

Solenopsis invicta are an invasive ant species from South America. The species has interbred with native ants to create hybrid ant species that threaten soybean production. All ants are eusocial, which means they live in strict social hiearchies.

Varroa Mite

Varroa Mite

Researchers have attributed recent declines in apiary honeybee populations to parasitic varroa mites, pictured between the bee's wings above. Varroa mites suck drone and developing brood blood, weakening individuals. An untreated varroa infestation may kill colonies.

Photograph by the U.S. Department of Agriculture

Golden Garden Spider

Golden Garden Spider

The golden garden spider, Argiope aurantia, is a member of the orb-web family. Here, an individual uses its spinnerets, located on its abdomen, to trap prey. Spiders are exclusively carnivorous, though the golden garden spider is no danger to humans.

Photograph by Tom McC

Widow Spider

Widow Spider

Widow spiders produce cobwebs and seclude themselves in dark, isolated areas. They have a painful bite, which requires medical attention, but they are rarely fatal.

Photograph by Charaj

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

The eastern tiger swallowtail, Papilo glaucus, is the state butterfly of Georgia. It's common across the eastern United States.

Courtesy of Loy Xingwen

Soybeans

Soybeans

The soybean plant, first introduced to Georgia in 1765, originated in China. The plant was brought to the Georgia colony by Samuel Bowen, who planted it after settling in Savannah. In the latter part of the nineteenth century, the U.S. Department of Agriculture encouraged the cultivation of soybeans in the state.

Photograph by Carl Dennis, Auburn University. Courtesy of IPM Images

Franklin D. Roosevelt at the Little White House

Franklin D. Roosevelt at the Little White House

In 1924, three years after Roosevelt contracted polio, he began visiting Warm Springs in Georgia. The springs were thought to be beneficial for polio victims. Roosevelt, who became the U.S. president in 1932, is pictured in front of the Little White House in Warm Springs.

Cotton Farmers

Cotton Farmers

Members of a Heard County family pose in front of their cotton crop, circa 1900. Residents of the county began raising cotton in the nineteenth century, but many were forced to abandon the crop during the first decades of the twentieth century, in the wake of the boll weevil devastations and the Great Depression.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
hrd005.

View on partner site

Soybean Pod

Soybean Pod

Soybeans were introduced to the United States by Samuel Bowen, a seaman who brought the seeds from China. At Bowen's request, Henry Yonge planted the first soybean crop on his farm in Thunderbolt, a few miles east of Savannah, in 1765.

Photograph by the United Soybean Board

Oat Harvesting

Oat Harvesting

Alonzo Fields (far right), the farm supervisor at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County, directs the harvesting of oats in 1939. Flint River Farms was an experimental planned community established in 1937 for African American sharecroppers.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF33- 030402-M1 [P&P].

School Campus

School Campus

The school building at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community, an experimental farm established in Macon County for African American sharecroppers, included a schoolhouse, teacher's residence, and related buildings.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

View on source site

Farm Houses

Farm Houses

An old and a new house at Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County are pictured in 1937. Cotton grows in the foreground.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection.

Health Clinic

Health Clinic

Dr. Thomas M. Adams and project nurse Lillie Mae McCormick, pictured in 1937, administer a typhoid shot in the health clinic at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF34- 051634-D [P&P] LOT 1541.

Wheat Field

Wheat Field

Project manager Amos Ward (left?) and Farm Security Administration borrower Simon Joiner inspect wheat in 1939 at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County. A variety of crops, including wheat, oats, cotton, pecans, and peaches were grown at the farms.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF33- 030398-M4 [P&P] LOT 1541.

Flint River Farms School

Flint River Farms School

Students, pictured in 1939, gather outside the schoolhouse at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County. A field of oats grows in front of the school.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF34- 051647-D [P&P] LOT 1541.

Elementary Schoolchildren

Elementary Schoolchildren

A classroom of first graders is pictured in 1939 at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County. The school opened to elementary-age children in 1938, and by 1946 it offered classes in all twelve grades.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF34- 051617-D [P&P] LOT 1541.

Home Economics Class

Home Economics Class

Evelyn M. Driver (center) instructs students in home economics and management in 1939 at the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection, #LC-USF33- 030379-M3 [P&P] LOT 1541.

Farm House

Farm House

An original home from the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community, established in 1937 in Macon County, is pictured in 2006.

Courtesy of Robert Zabawa

Flint River Farms Marker

Flint River Farms Marker

A historical marker commemorating the Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County, erected by the Georgia Historical Society, was dedicated in 2005.

Courtesy of Tasha Hargrove

D. W. Brooks

D. W. Brooks

D. W. Brooks, a national agricultural leader for much of the twentieth century, was a native of Franklin County. In 1933, along with five farmers, he founded the Georgia Cotton Cooperative Association in Carroll County. The cooperative, later known as the Cotton Producers Association, changed its name to Gold Kist in 1974.

D. W. Brooks

D. W. Brooks

D. W. Brooks speaks before a meeting of the Georgia Cotton Cooperative Association, which he cofounded in Carroll County in 1933. The association fostered cooperation among farmers to help them overcome numerous economic difficulties. Initially focused on cotton, the cooperative expanded into insurance, fertilizer, seed, and other farm supplies during the 1940s.

D. W. Brooks and Jimmy Carter

D. W. Brooks and Jimmy Carter

D. W. Brooks (left), a Georgia native, sits with U.S. president Jimmy Carter. Carter was one of seven presidents to be advised by Brooks on agricultural policy.

Georgia National Fairgrounds

Georgia National Fairgrounds

The main entrance of the Georgia National Fairgrounds and Agricenter, located in Perry, is pictured in 1990. The facility hosts the Georgia National Fair each October, in addition to a variety of sporting and agricultural events throughout the year.

Livestock Show

Livestock Show

A livestock show is one of the many events held during the Georgia National Fair, which takes place each October at the Georgia National Fairgrounds and Agricenter in Perry.

Soybeans

Soybeans

Mature soybeans, still in their pods, are ready for harvest. Most of the approximately 8.37 million bushels of soybeans produced annually in Georgia are used in the manufacture of cooking oil and animal feed.

Photograph by Scott Bauer, USDA Agricultural Research Service. Courtesy of IPM Images

Soybean Harvest

Soybean Harvest

Soybeans are generally planted in Georgia from mid-May to mid-June and are harvested from September to early October.

Brown and Dorsey

Brown and Dorsey

J. J. Brown (seated left), Georgia's eighth commissioner of agriculture, poses at John Harris's fish camp on the Chattahoochee River with Governor Hugh M. Dorsey (seated right), circa 1918.

Courtesy of Watson-Brown Foundation, Inc.

J. J. Brown

J. J. Brown

J. J. Brown served as the state's commissioner of agriculture for five consecutive terms, from 1917 to 1927. A Hart County native, Brown worked as a farmer and small-business owner before beginning his political career under the guidance of Populist leader Thomas E. Watson.

Courtesy of Watson-Brown Foundation, Inc.

Campaign Pamphlet

Campaign Pamphlet

J. J. Brown won five consecutive terms as Georgia's commissioner of agriculture, serving from 1917 to 1927. During his tenure, Brown created a state Bureau of Markets and established the Market Bulletin, a free weekly periodical for Georgia farmers still in circulation today as the Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin.

Courtesy of Watson-Brown Foundation, Inc.

Peanuts and Sandy Soil

Peanuts and Sandy Soil

The long growing season and sandy soils of Georgia are ideal for producing peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.), a legume native to South America. Georgia produces nearly half of the country's peanuts.

Photograph by the Georgia Peanut Commission 

Peanut Harvest

Peanut Harvest

A peanut crop in Effingham County is harvested in 2005.

Photo by Stephen Morton, UGA College of Agriculture

Shipping Peanuts

Shipping Peanuts

A load of peanuts is delivered to market in Seminole County by Irene Dozier (on ground), Millie Trulock (second from left on cab), and others in November 1941. The cultivation of peanuts, used to produce oil, was encouraged in Georgia during World War II.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
sem104-82.

View on partner site

Peanut Damage

Peanut Damage

Peanut pods decay as a result of holes bored by wireworms, also known as click beetles, which feed on the underground portions of many Georgia crops. 

Photograph by Steve L. Brown, University of Georgia. Courtesy of Forestry Images

Peanut Farmer

Peanut Farmer

A peanut farmer investigates his crop. Representatives of all segments of the peanut industry, from grower to manufacturer, are active in Georgia, as are a variety of affiliated industries. 

Photograph by uacescomm

Peanut Harvesting

Peanut Harvesting

Peanuts, which are planted in April or May, are harvested in September.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Interview with Frank McGill

During an oral history interview conducted in July 2014, Frank McGill recalls his career in the University of Georgia's Extension Service, becoming an expert on peanut production, and the effect of the peanut economy on small towns in Georgia.Interview with Frank McGill and Lois Boyd, First Person Project, FPP 53.

Pecans

Pecans

Pecan nuts are the fruit of pecan trees (Carya illinoensis), a species of hickory in the walnut family. First grown commercially in Georgia during the late 1880s, pecans became one of the state's most important commodities by the early 1900s. As of 2014 Georgia produced the most pecans in the country.

Photograph by Judy Baxter

Pecan Grove

Pecan Grove

A farmer stands in a Mitchell County pecan grove in the early twentieth century. The grove was one of the first to be planted in the county. Pecans, along with cotton, peanuts, and soybeans, continue to be an important agricultural product in Mitchell County.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
mit009.

View on partner site

Miller’s Pecan Company

Miller’s Pecan Company

Miller's Pecan Company, shown in 1932, was said to have been one of the largest pecan companies in the world during its time. Located in Baconton, in Mitchell County, the company cracked and shelled pecans, grading them by hand, and sold pecan tree saplings to growers.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
mit007.

View on partner site

Pecan Grove

Pecan Grove

Since the 1950s Georgia has been the top producer of pecans in the nation.

Photograph by Mark Strozier

Georgia Farm Bureau

Georgia Farm Bureau

The headquarters of the Georgia Farm Bureau, a state-level affiliate of the American Farm Bureau, are located in Macon. The bureau developed in response to the Smith-Lever Act of 1914 and continues to promote the interests of farmers in the twenty-first century.

Courtesy of Georgia Farm Bureau

Farm Bureau Meeting

Farm Bureau Meeting

Farmers arrive at a meeting of the Georgia Farm Bureau held at the Auburn Consolidated School in Barrow County, circa 1935. The state bureau is affiliated with the American Farm Bureau, which was an active participant in Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal programs during the 1930s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
brw060.

View on partner site

Farm Day

Farm Day

Shannon Moore, a member of the Georgia Farm Bureau in Jasper County, conducts Farm Day activities for fifth-grade students. Farm Day, an event sponsored by the bureau in locations around the state, is a forum for teaching children about agriculture.

Courtesy of Georgia Farm Bureau

Peanut Field

Peanut Field

A peanut field in Stewart County is watered by a center-pivot irrigation system. In Georgia approximately 10,000 center-pivot systems, primarily found in the Dougherty Plain of the Flint River, are used to irrigate a variety of crops.

Courtesy of Matthew M. Moye

Center-Pivot Irrigation

Center-Pivot Irrigation

A center-pivot irrigation system waters a cotton field. Central-pivot and drip irrigation are the primary systems used on more than 1.5 million acres of farmland across the state to supplement the annual forty to fifty inches of rainfall in Georgia.

Xeriscape Gardening

Xeriscape Gardening

Efficient irrigation is one of the seven steps involved in Xeriscape gardening, a method of gardening used primarily in urban areas to conserve water while maintaining lawns and plants. Drip irrigation and hand watering help target irrigation to plants that need it.

Photograph by Gary L. Wade

Hogs

Hogs

Hog production in Georgia was responsible for 8 percent of the state's livestock and aquaculture income in 2004. The number of hogs raised in Georgia declined during the late twentieth century, dropping from a high of 2.4 million head in 1979 to 345,000 in 2002.

Courtesy of Ken Stalder, Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University

Hogs

Hogs

Hogs tend to their young on a Colquitt County farm during the 1970s. First introduced to Georgia in the 1500s, hogs were raised by colonial settlers and became a primary food source during the nineteenth century. Hogs continued to be a major crop in the state until the 1980s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
clq099.

View on partner site

Hog Facility

Hog Facility

Although hogs were typically raised outdoors until the 1980s, today they are usually housed in environmentally controlled facilities. Such facilities allow farmers to increase the production of hogs while reducing the incidence of disease among the animals.

Courtesy of Ken Stalder, Department of Animal Science, Iowa State University

Feral Hogs

Feral Hogs

Although feral, or wild, hogs are found througout the state, their population is concentrated in coastal areas. Considered a nuisance, feral hogs are destructive to both human crops and structures and are also known to carry diseases communicable to farm and domestic animals.

Courtesy of Wildlife Resources Division, Georgia Department of Natural Resources

Hog Numbers, 1979

Hog Numbers, 1979

Hog production in Georgia peaked in 1979, when state farmers raised 2.4 million head. Raised primarily by grain farmers, hogs consumed stored grain during the winter months and increased the farms' profits.

Prepared by The National Center for Peanut Competitiveness

Hog Numbers, 1998

Hog Numbers, 1998

The number of hogs raised in Georgia dramatically decreased after 1979. Production dropped by two-thirds during the 1980s, and the combination of industry consolidation and low market prices drove production lower in the 1990s.

Prepared by The National Center for Peanut Competitiveness

Corn

Corn

Several varieties of corn, including flour, flint, dent, pop, and sweet, are grown in Georgia during the summer months. Although the pop and sweet varieties are produced for human consumption, most of the corn raised in Georgia is used for animal feed.

Courtesy of Dewey Lee

Wheat Field

Wheat Field

Wheat is grown mainly in the southern part of the state, although it's not a major crop in Georgia. About 350,000 acres of wheat were planted in 2002.

Image from Dizzy Girl

View on source site

Corn-Producing Counties

Corn-Producing Counties

Georgia's top corn-producing county in 2001 was Grady County, which produced more than 1.7 million bushels. Corn, the state's main summer crop, is grown primarily in south Georgia and often requires irrigation.

Courtesy of Georgia Agricultural Statistics Service

Wheat-Producing Counties

Wheat-Producing Counties

In 2001 wheat production in Georgia came to a total of 10.6 million bushels. Grain production in the state has dropped dramatically since the 1980s, largely as a result of droughts and low market prices.

Courtesy of Georgia Agricultural Statistics Service

Wheat Farmer

Wheat Farmer

A Georgia farmer examines his wheat crop, which is grown during the winter months. Soft red winter wheat, raised primarily for flour to be used in the baking industry, is the main variety produced in the state, although scientists are also experimenting with soft white wheat.

Courtesy of Dewey Lee

Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition

Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition

The Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition, held in Moultrie each year during the third week of October, features crop, livestock, and equipment demonstrations. The expo, which brings in an estimated $30 million to the area each year, attracted 200,000 visitors in 2005.

Photograph by Bob Parker. Courtesy of Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition

Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition

Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition

New farm equipment is demonstrated in a field during the 2005 Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition. Potential buyers have the opportunity to test drive all-terrain vehicles, tractors, and trucks during the weeklong annual event in Moultrie.

Photograph by Branch Carter. Courtesy of Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition

Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition

Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition

Demonstrations of various livestock, including horse, cattle, and goats, take place during the Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition in Moultrie each October.

Photograph by Bob Parker. Courtesy of Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition

Georgia Experiment Station

Georgia Experiment Station

Located in Griffin, the Georgia Experiment Station is one of three agricultural experiment stations in the state operated by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Courtesy of Jay Bauer, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Georgia Experiment Station

Georgia Experiment Station

A researcher at the Georgia Experiment Station in Griffin plows a field behind a three-mule team in 1900. Around this time, scientists at the station developed the deep furrow method of planting winter oats, a technique that saved millions of dollars for farmers in the South.

Courtesy of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

DNA Research

DNA Research

Tracie Jenkins, a geneticist at the Georgia Experiment Station in Griffin, studies the genetic makeup of termites, a major urban pest in the South. Her work has documented four different species of termites in Georgia.

Courtesy of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Beef Cows

Beef Cows

The first formulated feed diets for dairy and beef cattle in Georgia were discovered by scientists at the Georgia Experiment Station in Griffin in the early twentieth century.

Image from UGA CAES/Extension

View on source site

Turfgrass Research

Turfgrass Research

Gil Landry, a turfgrass specialist at the Georgia Experiment Station in Griffin, researches the use of sod to control soil erosion along the state's roadways.

Courtesy of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Georgia Experiment Station

Georgia Experiment Station

The Georgia Experiment Station in Griffin, pictured around 1907, was established in 1888 to perform agricultural research in such areas as fertilizers, soil erosion, and crop varieties. These studies led to the modernization of agricultural techniques in the South.

Image from UGA CAES/Extension

View on source site

Pesticide Research

Pesticide Research

Horticulturist Marc van Lersel studies the most effective way to apply pesticides to greenhouse plants at the Georgia Experiment Station in Griffin. Scientists at the station have led efforts to develop viable pesticides for use across the South.

Courtesy of University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Forest Camp

Forest Camp

Members of 4-H clubs gather in 1935 at Forest Camp in Cobb County. The 4-H organization first became active in Georgia in 1904, and in 1914 it was designated the youth program of the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service.

Courtesy of Georgia 4-H

4-H Product Sale

4-H Product Sale

A 4-H member sells goods to raise money for local 4-H clubs around 1925. Clubs for girls began as tomato, gardening, and canning clubs early in the twentieth century.

Courtesy of Georgia 4-H

Augusta Stock Show

Augusta Stock Show

4-H members exhibit at the Augusta Fat Stock Show in 1938. Before the integration of Georgia 4-H clubs in 1967, the Black division of 4-H was headquartered at Savannah State College, and separate events were held for its members in Dublin.

Courtesy of Georgia 4-H

4-H Centers

4-H Centers

Georgia 4-H centers are located in Eatonton, Tybee Island, Jekyll Island, Wahsega, and Fortson. The symbol for the organization is a four-leaf clover depicting the four H's, which stand for Head, Heart, Hands, and Health.

Courtesy of Georgia 4-H

Egg Candling Demonstration

Egg Candling Demonstration

Two 4-H members perform an egg candling and grading demonstration in Polk County in 1932.

Courtesy of Georgia 4-H

4-H Goat Show

4-H Goat Show

Five 4-H members exhibit goats during a show.

Courtesy of Georgia 4-H, Photograph by Judy Ashley..

4-H Hygiene Demonstration

4-H Hygiene Demonstration

Three girls in 4-H watch a hygiene demonstration, circa 1968.  4-H members frequently learn and compete through the use of demonstrations and presentations.

Courtesy of Georgia 4-H

Farmers Mutual Exchange

Farmers Mutual Exchange

Farmers gather in 1949 for the opening of the Farmers Mutual Exchange, likely a cooperative for cotton producers, in Winder.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
brw171.

View on partner site

Charles Barrett

Charles Barrett

In 1906 Charles Barrett, a native of Pike County, began his twenty-two-year presidency of the Farmer's Union, a national organization that encouraged farmers to improve productivity and income by creating cooperatives.

Cooperative Store

Cooperative Store

A farmer shops at the Irwinville Farms cooperative store (Irwin County) in 1938. Promoted by such national organizations as the National Grange and the Farmer's Union, cooperatives formed among farmers to acquire equipment, seed, and other supplies, as well as to organize the processing and marketing of their crops.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Eatonton Cooperative Creamery

Eatonton Cooperative Creamery

A worker, pictured in 1952 at the Eatonton Cooperative Creamery in Putnam County, processes milk.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #put230.

View on partner site

Fruitland Manor, ca. 1930

Fruitland Manor, ca. 1930

Fruitland Manor, the home of horticulturist Louis Berckmans, stands on the grounds of Berckmans Nursery. Berckmans and his son Prosper founded the nursery in 1858 and introduced a range of new fruit varieties and shrubs to the Southeast.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # ric035.

View on partner site

Augusta National Golf Club

Augusta National Golf Club

The Augusta National Golf Club, home of the Masters Tournament, was established by golfer Bobby Jones on the former grounds of Berckmans Nursery in 1931. The landscaping of the golf course includes many of the ornamental plants propagated between 1858 and 1918 by Louis and Prosper Berckmans.

Image from Brett Chisum

View on source site

Hens

Hens

In a north Georgia chicken house, thousands of hens lay hatching eggs for a company that exports the fertilized eggs to hatcheries around the world.

Courtesy of Carl Weinberg

Poultry Festival Parade

Poultry Festival Parade

The J. D. Jewell, Incorporated, float in Gainesville's Poultry Festival Parade is pictured circa 1950. Georgia is one of the top producers of broilers in the nation.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
hal388.

View on partner site

Queen Poultry

Queen Poultry

This cartoon from Georgia Poultry Times the depicts the dethroning of King Cotton by Queen Poultry in the post-World War II South.

From Georgia Poultry Times, February 17, 1954

Chicken House

Chicken House

This Dawson County chicken house, full of laying hens and a few roosters, holds some eight thousand birds.

Courtesy of Carl Weinberg

Poultry Processing Plant

Poultry Processing Plant

A Georgia poultry processing plant in 1961. The state's poultry industry produces an average of 24.6 million pounds of chicken and 14 million eggs daily.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Tracy O'Neal Photographic Collection, 1923-1975.

Immigrant Labor at Poultry Plant

Immigrant Labor at Poultry Plant

The labor-intensive cut-up operation in a Hall County poultry processing plant depends on young immigrant workers, primarily from Mexico.

Courtesy of Carl Weinberg

Women Raise Poultry

Women Raise Poultry

Chicken and egg raising was women's work in Georgia until poultry became big business. Women pioneered the early phase of the industry, selling millions of dollars in poultry products annually by the 1920s. 

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
hal003.

View on partner site

Toombs County Farming

Toombs County Farming

Vidalia onions grow in Toombs County, one of the counties served by an extension office of the Small Farmer Outreach Training and Technical Assistance Project of Fort Valley State University.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Raphael Moses

Raphael Moses

Major Raphael Moses, as chief supply officer for General James Longstreet, carried out the final order of the Confederate government. He is also credited with being the first to ship and sell peaches outside of the South.

Atlanta State Farmers Market

Atlanta State Farmers Market

One of the largest markets in the world, the Atlanta State Farmers Market covers 150 acres and offers consumers the opportunity to buy directly from farm producers. The market opened in Forest Park in 1959 and features a nursery with indoor and outdoor plants, restaurant, gift shop, and welcome center.

Courtesy of Georgia Department of Agriculture

Georgia Department of Agriculture

Georgia Department of Agriculture

Front facade of the Georgia Department of Agriculture building on Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in downtown Atlanta. The department is the state's oldest independent executive agency.

Courtesy of Georgia Department of Agriculture

Tifton Chemical Lab

Tifton Chemical Lab

The Feed and Fertilizer Laboratories and the Pesticide Formulation, Soil Termiticide, Treated Wood, Use/Misuse, and Groundwater Laboratories of the Georgia Department of Agriculture are located in Tifton. The Food Microbiology and Dairy Laboratories and the Food Chemistry and Pesticide Residue Laboratories are in Atlanta.

Courtesy of Georgia Department of Agriculture

Peanuts

Peanuts

Peanuts were selected as the official state crop by the General Assembly in 1995. Nearly 50 percent of the total U.S. peanut crop is harvested in Georgia, which leads the nation in peanut exports.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Cotton Boll

Cotton Boll

Cotton is no longer "king" in Georgia, but the crop is still grown, mostly on the Coastal Plain. Bulloch, Dooly, Colquitt, Mitchell, and Worth counties in south central and southwest Georgia were the top cotton producers in 2017.

Photograph by Michael Bass-Deschenes

Cotton Crop

Cotton Crop

In the twenty-first century, most of the cotton in Georgia is produced by agribusinesses that manage large tracts of cotton land. In 2000 Georgia ranked second in the country in acreage of cotton.

Photograph by Kimberly Varderman 

Women in Cotton Field

Women in Cotton Field

Farm workers, pictured circa 1897, pose with their cotton harvest in Fitzgerald, the seat of Ben Hill County. In the decades following the Civil War, cotton fields were worked predominantly by Black sharecroppers.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ben139.

View on partner site

Enslaved Women in Cotton Field

Enslaved Women in Cotton Field

Since antebellum planters reserved artisan positions for enslaved males, the majority of the (rice and cotton) field hands were female. Enslaved women constituted nearly 60 percent of the field workforce on coastal plantations.

Macon Cotton Factory

Macon Cotton Factory

Antebellum towns including Macon, Milledgeville, Madison, and Greensboro experimented with steam-powered cotton factories, with varying degrees of success. The steam-powered factories in Madison and Greensboro went broke in the 1850s, while those in Milledgeville and Macon survived to serve the Confederacy.

Enslaved Laborers in Cotton Field

Enslaved Laborers in Cotton Field

An illustration depicts enslaved laborers working in a southern cotton field. After the Civil War the most important issue to white landowners was that many of their best cotton fields lay in disrepair and their cotton field labor had been emancipated.

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries, Robert E. Williams Photographic Collection.

Thomaston Mills

Thomaston Mills

Wokers for the Thomaston Mills in Upson County inspect a roll of cotton fabric. During the 1950s, inexpensive tufted cotton carpets began to replace higher-quality wool carpets in the marketplace.

Courtesy of Thomaston-Upson Archives

Boll Weevil

Boll Weevil

The primary damage to cotton occurs when female boll weevils deposit eggs in fruiting structures on developing cotton plants.

Photograph from the Agricultural Research Service

Mechanical Cotton Picker

Mechanical Cotton Picker

Tractors, beginning in the 1930s, and mechanical cotton pickers decades later, initially disrupted cotton production and the lives of those who worked in the fields. Today cotton farmers rely on the machinery.

Photograph from the Agricultural Research Service

Cotton Bales

Cotton Bales

Cotton bales are prepared for shipping.

Weighing Cotton, 1939-40

Weighing Cotton, 1939-40

Carroll County resident J. G. Richards Sr. (center) weighs a basket of cotton that has just been picked. Roosevelt Robinson is standing just behind Richards, along with other cotton pickers.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
car111.

View on partner site

Cotton Flower

Cotton Flower

The presence of beneficial insects such as the lady bird beetles on this cotton bloom are testimony to the benefit of reduced pesticide use as a result of the boll weevil eradication program.

Courtesy of Agricultural Research Service. Photograph by Rob Flynn

Center-Pivot Irrigation System

Center-Pivot Irrigation System

A center-pivot irrigation system uniformly waters a cotton crop. Such systems supplement rainfall on more than 1 million acres of farmland in Georgia.

cotton-boll-nearly-ready-for-harvest_001

Corn

Corn

Native Americans planted corn, one of the oldest crops in Georgia, before the colonists arrived. In 2018 Georgians planted 325,000 acres of corn.

Photograph by Possum1500

Peanut Harvest

Peanut Harvest

Many factors, such as late frosts, rainfall, viruses, and economics, can determine whether a peanut crop is successful. Georgia produces more peanuts than any other state.

Photograph by uacescomm 

Broilers

Broilers

Broilers are pictured in 1950 on a farm in Barrow County. Jesse Jewell of Gainsville first encouraged the development of a broiler industry in 1930. Today Georgia produces more broilers than any other state.   

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
brw167.

View on partner site

Dairy Cows

Dairy Cows

Milk production in Georgia totaled 1.76 billion pounds in 2018. The greatest number of dairy cows were in Macon County and Burke County.

Photograph by Equipe Integrada

Pumpkin Farm

Pumpkin Farm

Pumpkins are arranged in squares at a Dawson County pumpkin farm.

Photograph by JR P 

Vidalia Onions

Vidalia Onions

Vidalia onions, grown in south Georgia, are one of the state's most valuable agricultural products.

Photo courtesy of USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service 

Roadside Produce Stand

Roadside Produce Stand

Roadside produce stands are common around rural Georgia. Travelers can purchase farm-fresh produce grown locally at such stands.

Photograph by Jim Reynolds 

Horse Farm

Horse Farm

Horses boarded on a farm near Tallapoosa, in Haralson County.

Working Horses

Working Horses

Team of farm-horses hauling logs in north Georgia, 1943. The method is called "snaking" the logs.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive.

4-H Horse Show

4-H Horse Show

A young girl prepares her horse before a 4-H horse show.

Courtesy of Georgia 4-H, Photograph by Glen Blair..

Georgia International Horse Park

Georgia International Horse Park

The Georgia International Horse Park in Conyers was built for the 1996 Olympics. The park features a world-class steeplechase course.

Image from carterse

View on source site

Muscadine Grapes

Muscadine Grapes

Georgia leads the nation in the production of muscadine table grapes.

Courtesy of Gerard Krewer

Chateau Elan

Chateau Elan

Almost 200 acres of vineyards at Chateau Elan, a winery in Braselton, are planted with Vitis vinifera varieties and French-American hybrids. Chateau Elan produces an average of 40,000 cases of wine annually.

Courtesy of Gerard Krewer

Georgia Wines

Georgia Wines

The Georgia wine industry, with many award-winning wines, has retail sales around $10 million annually.

Courtesy of Gerard Krewer

Grape Harvest

Grape Harvest

Muscadine grapes, which are grown primarily in north Georgia, are harvested in late summer or early fall.

Courtesy of Gerard Krewer

Blueberries

Blueberries

Georgia's blueberry industry is concentrated in the flatwoods of southeast Georgia, and the fruit is shipped all over the world.

Photography by Andie aka "Andrea"

Blueberries

Blueberries

Tifblue is a rabbiteye blueberry grown on about 40 percent of the blueberry acreage in Georgia.

Courtesy of Gerard Krewer

Blueberries

Blueberries

A Baxley fruit grower inspects a field of early ripening southern highbush blueberries.

Courtesy of Gerard Krewer

Blueberry Harvest

Blueberry Harvest

A mechanical harvester used to pick blueberries for the processing market.

Courtesy of Gerard Krewer

Strawberries

Strawberries

A strawberry grower from Montezuma, with a fresh harvest.

Courtesy of Gerard Krewer

Mule Plowing

Mule Plowing

Visitors to the Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village can experience everyday nineteenth-century-style farming practices, such as mule plowing.

Courtesy of Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village

Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village

Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village

The Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village is a living history museum and the state's official museum of agriculture. The facility offers visitors the opportunity to explore aspects of rural life in the nineteeenth century.

Spinning

Spinning

A woman dressed in nineteenth-century costume demonstrates the technique of spinning at the Georgia Museum of Agriculture and Historic Village.

Rome Beauty Apple

Rome Beauty Apple

The most popular apple varieties grown in Georgia include Empire, Fuji, Granny Smith, Jonagold, Jonathan, Ozark Gold, Paulard, Red Delicious, Rome Beauty, and Yates. The Annual Apple Festival, hosted each October in Ellijay, features a crafts show and vendors selling a variety of apple products.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Boll Weevil

Boll Weevil

A boll weevil perched on a cotton plant. The adult weevil measures from three to eight millimeters from the tip of the snout to the abdomen, which is half the length of its body.

Courtesy of insectimages.com, USDA Cooperative Extension Slide Series, Clemson University

Boll Weevil Trap

Boll Weevil Trap