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Mourning Dove

Mourning Dove

Athos Menaboni's undated lithograph Mourning Dove (26" x 20") is housed at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta. Menaboni is best known for his detailed paintings of birds, usually portrayed in pairs in their natural habitats.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Athos Menaboni

Athos Menaboni

Athos Menaboni, pictured in 1945, stands in his aviary studying a golden eagle.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive.

Bobwhite

Bobwhite

Artist Athos Menaboni was renowned for his detailed paintings of birds. He and his wife, Sara, obtained permits to capture rare and protected species for study at their home near Atlanta. Menaboni's undated lithograph Bobwhite (26" x 20") is housed at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Cardinals

Cardinals

Artist Athos Menaboni made his first bird painting in 1937, when he painted a cardinal from memory during a lull in commissioned work. His undated lithograph Cardinals (13 1/4" x 10 1/2") is housed at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Brown Leghorn

Brown Leghorn

Athos Menaboni, renowned for his bird paintings, reached the height of his career during the 1940s and 1950s. His undated lithograph Brown Leghorn (22" x 17 1/2") is housed at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

American Bald Eagle

American Bald Eagle

American Bald Eagle by Athos Menaboni is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Lithograph, 23 x 30 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Red Shoes, Blue Vase, Glass and Carnations

Red Shoes, Blue Vase, Glass and Carnations

Savannah native Emma Cheves Wilkins's undated Red Shoes, Blue Vase, Glass and Carnations (oil on canvas, 20 1/4" x 24 1/8") is part of the collection at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Blue Jug and Camellias

Blue Jug and Camellias

Emma Cheves Wilkins, the third generation in a family of Savannah artists, specialized in painting portraits, landscapes, and still lifes. Her undated Blue Jug and Camellias (oil on canvas, 23" x 21") is part of the collection at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Youngster Sitting atop Hawks Bill, N.C.

Youngster Sitting atop Hawks Bill, N.C.

Youngster Sitting atop Hawks Bill, N.C. was painted by Savannah native Emma Cheves Wilkins, who is known for her impressionistic landscapes. The undated painting (pastel on sandpaper, 14 5/8" x 11 5/8") is part of the collection at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

In the Hall

In the Hall

Impressionist painter Hattie Saussy completed In the Hall (oil on board, 20" x 24") in 1927. Saussy spent much of her career in her native Savannah, where she was an active member of the Savannah Art Association.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Portrait of Hattie Saussy

Portrait of Hattie Saussy

Hattie Saussy, a Savannah native, established herself as an impressionistic painter following study in Savannah, New York City, and Paris in the 1910s. She is depicted in this undated portrait (oil on canvas, 21 7/8" x 18") by fellow Savannah artist Christopher Murphy Jr.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Stream in Wooded Landscape

Stream in Wooded Landscape

Impressionist painter Hattie Saussy's undated Stream in Wooded Landscape (oil on canvas board, 15 7/8" x 11 7/8") is one example of the landscape paintings for which she is well known. Saussy traveled throughout the region of her native Savannah, painting landscapes outdoors, from the 1920s through the 1970s.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Portrait—Girl in Red

Portrait—Girl in Red

Hattie Saussy painted Portrait—Girl in Red (oil on board, 24" x 20") in 1935. A Savannah native, Saussy painted numerous portraits, as well as impressionistic landscapes, during her long career.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Auction Barn

Auction Barn

Jackson Lee Nesbitt created the lithograph Auction Barn (15" x 19 1/2") in Atlanta with master printer Wayne Kline in 1989. The image is a composite of several sketches of Arkansas cattle auctions in the 1940s. Nesbitt added a Coca-Cola bottle, which sits on a rafter behind the auctioneer.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Jackson Lee Nesbitt

Jackson Lee Nesbitt

Jackson Lee Nesbitt, pictured circa 1955, was a native of the Midwest and a well-regarded printmaker and painter for much of the twentieth century. In 1957 he moved to Atlanta and gave up his art to work in advertising, but in 1987 he resumed printmaking at Rolling Stone Press in Atlanta.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

The Matthew W. Johnston Family

The Matthew W. Johnston Family

Jackson Lee Nesbitt's 1990 lithograph The Matthew W. Johnston Family (12 1/4" x 15") is composed of a mother and daughter whom Nesbitt knew during his childhood in Oklahoma. The man in the image was a model from the Kansas City Art Institute, where Nesbitt studied from 1933 to 1938.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

American Center Paris, 1994

American Center Paris, 1994

Jasper Johns donated the 1994 lithograph American Center Paris, 1994 (42" x 36 1/16") to Brenau University Galleries in honor of his aunts Gladys and Eunice Johns, both alumnae of the university, whose childhood images appear in the upper right corner.

Art (c) Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, N.Y. Courtesy of Brenau University Galleries

William Jasper Statue

William Jasper Statue

A statue of William Jasper, a Revolutionary War hero who was killed during the Siege of Savannah in 1779, stands on Madison Square in Savannah. The town of Jasper, the seat of Pickens County, was named in his honor.

Image from Disc wheel

Mosquito Fleet

Mosquito Fleet

Savannah artist Christopher Murphy Jr.'s undated painting Mosquito Fleet (oil on board, 11" x 13 3/4") depicts the vessels used by African American fishermen along the Georgia coast. Murphy is known for creating paintings and etchings that capture the activity in the streets and along the waterfront of his native Savannah.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Christopher Murphy Jr.

Christopher Murphy Jr.

Christopher Murphy Jr., captured in this undated self-portrait (oil on board, 23 3/4" x 18"), was a prominent Savannah artist and teacher for much of the twentieth century. He is known particularly for his depictions of Savannah daily life and architecture, as well as for his portraiture.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Green Kimono

Green Kimono

Christopher Murphy Jr., a Savannah native and artist, painted a number of portraits, such as his undated Green Kimono (oil on canvas, 22" x 18"). The painting's dark background and the serene expression of the sitter contrast with the vibrant pattern of her kimono.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Joe Street, Savannah

Joe Street, Savannah

Joe Street, Savannah (charcoal on paper, 9 3/4" x 15 1/2"), an undated etching by Savannah artist Christopher Murphy Jr., was chosen in 1935 by the Print Club of Rochester in New York as its second annual presentation print.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Different Levels

Different Levels

Christopher Murphy Jr.'s undated drawing Different Levels (graphite on paper, 10" x 7 3/4") was the source for one of the thirty-seven illustrations Murphy created for the book Savannah (1947), which was written by Savannah historian Walter Charlton Hartridge.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Black Man Seated on a Chair

Black Man Seated on a Chair

The subject of Black Man Seated on a Chair (1910), a sepia wash on paper by Savannah artist Lucile Desbouillons Murphy, may have been an employee of the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences, where Murphy studied under Carl Brandt in the 1890s.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Street Scene, Savannah

Street Scene, Savannah

Margaret Augusta Murphy, the daughter of Savannah artists Lucile Desbouillons and Christopher P. H. Murphy, painted the watercolor Street Scene, Savannah between 1930 and 1940. Her watercolor technique developed under the tutelage of Eliot O'Hara, a visiting artist at the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Dispossessed

Dispossessed

Realist painter Alexander Brook's undated work Dispossessed (watercolor on paper, 14 1/4" x 16 3/8") depicts the dignity of a desperate family by capturing the expression of the woman in a pensive moment, amid what appear to be bleak prospects.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Alexander Brook

Alexander Brook

Alexander Brook, a native of New York, was a prominent figurative painter during the first half of the twentieth century. Between 1938 and 1948 he lived sporadically in Savannah, where he executed numerous sketches that became the basis for paintings exhibited nationwide.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Georgia Jungle Study

Georgia Jungle Study

Alexander Brook's undated sketch of a woman living in the Yamacraw district of Savannah was used for the central figure in the foreground of his finished work, Georgia Jungle. Brook was awarded first prize at the Carnegie International exhibition for the painting in 1939.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Savannah Chickens and Shacks

Savannah Chickens and Shacks

Alexander Brook, a prominent New York painter, was fascinated with the rural landscape and vernacular architecture on the outskirts of Savannah. The horizontal line of the leaning shacks in his undated painting Savannah Chickens and Shacks (oil on canvas, 12" x 26") is enhanced by far-off smoke as the chickens give the only living presence to the scene.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Run Little Chillun, Run, Fo’ de Devil’s Done Loose

Run Little Chillun, Run, Fo’ de Devil’s Done Loose

Hilda Belcher, a prominent artist, painted Run Little Chillun, Run, Fo' de Devil's Done Loose (oil on board, 13 7/8" x 11 3/4") in 1931. Belcher, a native of Vermont, attended services at several African American churches around Savannah during her frequent visits to the city. In this work, which was also the basis for a 1935 oil painting of the same name, she captures the energy of a Savannah choir.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Hilda and Martha Belcher

Hilda and Martha Belcher

Hilda Belcher (left) poses with her mother, Martha Wood Belcher, in 1913 at Daventry, England. Hilda Belcher, a native of Vermont, traveled frequently to Georgia during her career to sketch scenes, particularly in Savannah, and to paint commissioned portraits.

Reprinted by permission of the Belcher family

Court Day, Marietta

Court Day, Marietta

Nell Choate Jones's Court Day, Marietta (charcoal, pencil, ink, and gouache on tracing paper, 19" x 24") depicts a crowd of people, shown without individual features, as they congregate around the courthouse, which is barely visible in the background. Action and gesture take precedence in this vividly colored, undated work.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Georgia Red Clay

Georgia Red Clay

The oil painting Georgia Red Clay (25" x 30") was made by Georgia native Nell Choate Jones in 1946. The painting exemplifies several aspects of her style, including strong contours and shapes, as well as a modernist emphasis on color.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Nell Choate Jones

Nell Choate Jones

Nell Choate Jones, pictured at her 100th birthday party in 1979, was a prominent artist whose paintings were exhibited widely from 1925 until 1979. A Hawkinsville native, Jones drew inspiration for her work from southern landscapes and culture.

Courtesy of Mrs. Thomas S. Potts

Cotton Blooms

Cotton Blooms

Hawkinsville native Nell Choate Jones painted Cotton Blooms (mixed media on paper, 21 3/8" x 17 7/8") circa 1936. This still life depicts a plant commonly seen in Georgia but rarely found in the colder climates where the artist spent most of her long life.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Sea Dive

Sea Dive

Sea Dive (monoprint with African fabric collage, 29 1/2" x 20 3/4"), created in 1989 by Atlanta native Emma Amos, depicts a clothed figure hovering in midair above a body of water, which is divided by a strip of African fabric. Action lines in the air and water enhance the sense of the figure's movement.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Mosaic Bench

Mosaic Bench

This glass mosaic bench (1996) forms part of an art installation designed by artist Emma Amos for the Ralph David Abernathy Memorial Plaza in Atlanta, which commemorates the legacy of the civil rights leader. Amos's installation also includes a bronze chair and a gazebo.

Courtesy of Emma Amos

Emma Amos

Emma Amos

Emma Amos, an Atlanta native and acclaimed artist, worked in a variety of media, including printmaking, painting, textiles, and collage. Her work explored issues of politics, race, gender, and cultural history. Amos was a professor and former chair at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University in New Jersey.

Courtesy of Emma Amos

Does Black Rub Off?

Does Black Rub Off?

Emma Amos, an acclaimed artist and Atlanta native, painted Does Black Wear Off? (oil on canvas, African fabric, and photo transfers, 90" x 56") in 1999. A cloth border imprinted with hands and minstrel's white gloves encloses a strip of woven fabric from Burkina Faso. The multi-hued female figure wears a minstrel's black face with images of figurines repeated around her.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Children’s Mardi Gras

Children’s Mardi Gras

Children's Mardi Gras (oil on canvas, 29 1/2" x 34 1/2") was painted by Andree Ruellan in 1949. Although seemingly playful, the painting is executed in a dark palette and is more somber than the artist's work prior to World War II.

Courtesy of Columbus Museum. Museum purchase made possible by Norman S. Rothschild in honor of his parents, Aleen and Irwin B. Rothschild

Spring in Georgia

Spring in Georgia

Andree Ruellan's mural Spring in Georgia, commissioned by the U.S. Treasury Department's Section of Fine Arts, was installed at the Lawrenceville post office in 1942. Today the mural is housed in the R. G. Stephens Federal Building in Athens.

Courtesy of U.S. General Services Administration, Public Buildings Service, Fine Arts Collection.

Morning on the River

Morning on the River

Artist Andree Ruellan's Morning on the River (gouache on paper, 12 1/4" x 18 1/2"), executed in 1940, captures the Savannah River in morning light and includes several people and shanties along the water's edge.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Untitled

Untitled

Artist Larry Connatser's untitled painting (acrylic on wood, 13" x 13"), created circa 1980, is a complex composition containing numerous figures in an architectural setting. Identifiable furniture is juxtaposed with fantasy elements.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Larry Connatser

Larry Connatser

Larry Connatser, a self-taught artist who spent much of his life in Georgia, created 2,500 paintings, 800 drawings, and numerous murals over the course of his career. Hallmarks of his expressionistic style include bright colors, fantasy figures, and dreamlike spaces.

Courtesy of the Joan Cobitz Estate

Decatur Station Mural

Decatur Station Mural

A section of the mural at the Decatur MARTA station (paint on architectural brick, twin murals each 66' x 26') are visible to passengers at both the concourse and platform levels. The mural was created by Georgia artist Larry Connatser in 1981 and depicts stylized renderings of the mountains and sea as vacation destinations.

Image from Joel Mann

View on source site

Decatur Station Mural

Decatur Station Mural

Of his twin murals painted at the MARTA station in Decatur, artist Larry Connatser explained, "Stylized fantasies of the two favorite American vacations--escapes to the mountain and sea, were my theme. . . . A stylized ocean and mountain flowers enhance these expressions."

Courtesy of MARTA

All That Jazz Party

All That Jazz Party

All That Jazz Party, a mural designed by artist Larry Connatser and created with the help of students in 1980, covered the floor of the original library in Poetter Hall at the Savannah College of Art and Design. The mural remains intact at Poetter Hall, which today houses administrative offices.

Courtesy of the Savannah College of Art and Design

#1764

#1764

#1764 (1974) by Larry Connatser is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Acrylic, 21 x 24 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

#2149

#2149

#2149 (1977) by Larry Connatser is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Acrylic, 26 x 26 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Untitled

Untitled

Untitled by Larry Connatser is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Acrylic, 48 1/4 x 48 1/4 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Rainbow

Rainbow

Painter Gari Melchers's Rainbow (oil on canvas, 27 1/4" x 30"), an example of the artist's impressionistic style, was created circa 1925.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Gari Melchers

Gari Melchers

Gari Melchers, pictured circa 1900, was a prominent painter in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A native of Michigan, he established studios in the Netherlands, Virginia, and New York City over the course of his career. In 1906 he was appointed fine arts advisor to the Telfair Academy of Arts and Sciences in Savannah, for which he acquired more than seventy works of art.

Image from Frank Scott Clark

The Unpretentious Garden

The Unpretentious Garden

Gari Melchers's oil painting The Unpretentious Garden (33 5/8" x 40 1/2") was created around 1905 and is an example of the artist's impressionistic style.

Courtesy of Telfair Museums.

Marie (West Indian)

Marie (West Indian)

Artist Gari Melchers painted Marie (West Indian) (gouache on paper, 18 1/2" x 11") around 1925, during a trip to the West Indies. The subject of the painting, whom Melchers called "Ma Petite," was one of the painter's favorite models.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

St. Yacht Thelma

St. Yacht Thelma

William O. Golding, a Savannah native who spent most of his life at sea, created around sixty drawings of ships and ports while a patient at the U.S. Marine Hospital in Savannah. He completed St. Yacht Thelma, Bangor, Maine, June 12, 1935 (crayon and graphite on paper, 9" x 12") in 1935.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

St. Yacht Ramona

St. Yacht Ramona

William O. Golding's St. Yacht Ramona (crayon and pencil on paper, 8 3/4 " x 11 3/4") depicts ships in American waters and features a lighthouse and flags, both recurring images in the artist's work.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Merchant Ship—Scarlet

Merchant Ship—Scarlet

African American artist William O. Golding drew his Merchant Ship—Scarlet (crayon and pencil on paper, 9" x 12") in 1934. In a variation on his distinctive image of the sun partially hidden by a cloud, a recurring image in the artist's work, Golding places the sun at the horizon in this drawing.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

U.S.S. Constitution

U.S.S. Constitution

In 1932, at the U.S. Marine Hospital in Savannah, an African American seaman named William O. Golding began to produce color drawings of ships and ports, apparently based on his own experiences at sea. Golding may have seen the USS Constitution, America's oldest commissioned vessel, on its tour of the east coast in 1931.

Courtesy of Rita Trotz Collection

Yellow Breasted Finch

Yellow Breasted Finch

John Abbot painted his Yellow Breasted Finch (watercolor on paper, 11 1/8" x 8 3/4") in 1790, fifteen years after moving from Virginia to Georgia. A native of England, Abbot traveled to America in 1773 and spent the remainder of his life collecting and drawing specimens of New World birds, insects, and butterflies.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Grebe, Didapper, or Water Witch

Grebe, Didapper, or Water Witch

Painter John Abbot's Grebe, Didapper, or Water Witch (watercolor on paper, 11 1/8" x 8 3/4") is housed at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

John Abbot Plaque

John Abbot Plaque

This bronze plaque depicting the naturalist and illustrator John Abbot graces a monument erected in 1957 by the Georgia Historical Society and the Georgia Historical Commission in Bulloch County. Abbot, a British native, collected and drew numerous specimens of birds, insects, butterflies, and moths during his nearly sixty-five years in Georgia.

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society, Georgia Historical Society Collection of Photographs, 1870-1960, #1361PH-24-01-4588.

View on partner site

La Belle Dame d’Amerique

La Belle Dame d’Amerique

This watercolor of a butterfly, today identified as the American Painted Lady, is one of many images depicting butterflies and moths by John Abbot, a British collector and illustrator who lived and worked in Georgia from 1775 until around 1840.

From The Natural History of the Rarer Lepidopterous Insects of Georgia, by J. Abbot

Little Horn Owl or Screech Owl

Little Horn Owl or Screech Owl

John Abbot, a painter and naturalist, created Little Horn Owl or Screech Owl (watercolor on paper, 11 1/8" x 8 3/4") in 1790. From 1775 until 1818 Abbot lived and worked in present-day Burke County, sending specimens and illustrations of New World species to collectors in his homeland of England.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Art of the Negro: Muses

Art of the Negro: Muses

Inspired by the Mexican muralists, Hale Woodruff, a nationally recognized African American artist, completed three mural series over the course of his career. Art of the Negro was completed around 1951 and hangs in the gallery at Clark Atlanta University, where Woodruff taught art for fifteen years. His other murals are entitled The Amistad Mutiny (1939) and The Negro in California History (1949).

Courtesy of Clark Atlanta University Art Galleries

Hale Woodruff

Hale Woodruff

Hale Woodruff, a member of the Atlanta University (later Clark Atlanta University) faculty from 1931 until 1946, stands before one of his murals. Woodruff trained in Paris, France, and became a nationally known printmaker, draftsman, and painter during his career.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information photograph collection, Photograph by Arthur Rothstein.

View on source site

Celestial Gate (1953)

Celestial Gate (1953)

Hale Woodruff's 1953 work Celestial Gate (oil on canvas, 50" x 40") hangs in the gallery of the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art. During the 1930s and 1940s, Woodruff, a prominent African American artist, was a member of Atlanta University's faculty and taught classes at Spelman.

Courtesy of Spelman College Museum of Fine Art

Ostia, Italy (1962)

Ostia, Italy (1962)

Ben Shute, a prominent Atlanta artist, is well known for his landscape portraits of such diverse locales as Mexico, Italy, and the Georgia coast. Ostia, Italy (1962), casein and ink on paper.

Courtesy of Betty Plummer Woodruff Collection

Night Carnival (1940)

Night Carnival (1940)

Acclaimed artist Ben Shute, a cofounder of the Atlanta College of Art, lived in Atlanta from 1928 until his death in 1986. His 1940 work Night Carnival, Franklin, N.C., casein and ink on paper, is housed in the permanent collection of the Georgia Museum of Art in Athens.

Courtesy of Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia; Gift of Betty Plummer Potts Woodruff GMOA 2004.7

Otis with Bible (1940)

Otis with Bible (1940)

Acclaimed artist Ben Shute, a Wisconsin native, lived for the majority of his career in Atlanta, where he earned a reputation as an accomplished portrait artist. His Otis with Bible, charcoal on paper, was completed in 1940.

Courtesy of Georgia Musuem of Art, University of Georgia; Gift of Betty Plummer Potts Woodruff GMOA 2004.6

Deserted House (1965)

Deserted House (1965)

Beginning in the early 1950s, Atlanta artist Ben Shute traveled to coastal Maine, where he painted elements of the landscape using a shifting cubist perspective. Deserted House, Port Clyde, Maine (1965), casein and ink on paper.

Courtesy of Betty Plummer Woodruff Collection

The Hiker

The Hiker

The Hiker (1980) by Nellie Mae Rowe is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Crayon, 29 x 24 1/2 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Nellie Mae Rowe

Nellie Mae Rowe

Nellie Mae Rowe stands in front of her home in Vinings. After her husband's death in 1948, Rowe began decorating both the interior and exterior of the house with drawings, dolls, and recycled objects. Discovered by artists and collectors during the 1970s, Rowe's work is exhibited today in museums around the country.

Nellie Mae Rowe with Little Nellie

Nellie Mae Rowe with Little Nellie

Nellie Mae Rowe with Little Nellie (felt tip pen and paint on photograph, approximately 10 x 12 inches) was completed near the end of the artist's life in 1982. Nellie Mae Rowe, an African American artist who spent much of her life in Vinings, achieved recognition for her art during the 1970s.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Haint in Woods

Haint in Woods

Self-taught artist Nellie Mae Rowe's 1981 drawing Haint in Woods (Cray-Pas oil pastels, ballpoint pen, and pencil on paper, 18 x 24 inches) exhibits the artist's frequent use of African and Afro-Caribbean motifs in her work.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Woman in Bonnet

Woman in Bonnet

Nellie Mae Rowe, a self-taught artist from Georgia, often produced art objects incorporating found and recycled materials. Rowe used chewing gum to create her 1980 Woman in a Bonnet (chewing gum and acrylic mounted on ceramic tile, 5 1/2 x 5 inches).

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Self-Portrait with Figure and Chicken

Self-Portrait with Figure and Chicken

Beverly Buchanan's undated Self-Portrait with Figure and Chicken (marker and pen on paper, 4 11/16" x 6 3/16") includes images associated with the artist's childhood memories of rural Georgia.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Flye Town

Flye Town

Beverly Buchanan constructed her 1990 sculpture Flye Town (13 3/4" x 45" x 12") from wood, metal, and paint as a tribute to the creativity and resourcefulness that rural southern farmers bring to the use of available materials.

Image from Allison Meier

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Beverly Buchanan

Beverly Buchanan

Self-taught artist Beverly Buchanan maintained for many years a studio in Athens, where she created pieces that commemorate the rural South of Black sharecroppers. Housed in many collections across the state, Buchanan's work is characterized by the use of found objects and vibrant color.

Photograph by Jack D. Bridges

Two Red Shacks

Two Red Shacks

Beverly Buchanan's Two Red Shacks (1996) is an abstract representation of the sharecropper shack, a type of vernacular architecture that was formerly widespread in the rural South. Oil pastel on paper, 10 1/2" x 14 3/8".

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Homage

Homage

Homage (1989) by Benny Andrews is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Mixed media (oil collage), 35 3/4 x 29 1/2 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Preacher

Preacher

Benny Andrews, a native of Plainview, began experimenting with collage as a student at the Art Institute of Chicago during the 1950s. His 1994 work Preacher, oil and collage on canvas (48 x 28 inches), is housed at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art. Reprinted by permission of Benny Andrews

Benny and George Andrews

Benny and George Andrews

Renowned artist Benny Andrews stands beside his father, George Andrews. George, a self-taught artist, encouraged the creative endeavors of Benny as well as Benny's brother Raymond Andrews, an acclaimed novelist.

Front Porch Conversation

Front Porch Conversation

Benny Andrews's subject matter often evokes images of his childhood experiences in rural Georgia, as evidenced by his 1969 ink-on-paper drawing Front Porch Conversation (18 1/8 x 23 3/4 inches). In 1965, after establishing himself as a successful artist in New York City, Andrews returned to Georgia and produced his Autobiographical Series paintings.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art. Reprinted by permission of Benny Andrews

Benny Andrews

Benny Andrews

Benny Andrews, an acclaimed artist and activist, conducts an outreach program at Augusta's Copeland Elementary School in 1997. Andrews taught at Queens College in New York City for twenty-nine years and cofounded both the Black Emergency Cultural Coalition and the Benny Andrews Foundation.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Hmmmmm

Hmmmmm

Hmmmmm (date unknown) by Benny Andrews is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Pen and ink, 15 x 11 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Old Woman Eating

Old Woman Eating

Old Woman Eating by Benny Andrews is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Pen and ink, 17 1/2 x 11 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Plower

Plower

Plower (1990) by Benny Andrews is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Pen and ink, 22 1/4 x 15 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Rock

Rock

Rock (1990) by Benny Andrews is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Pen and ink, 22 x 15 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Study #35 for Symbols

Study #35 for Symbols

Study #35 for Symbols (date unknown) by Benny Andrews is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Pen and ink, 15 x 13 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

The Good Life

The Good Life

The Good Life (date unknown) by Benny Andrews is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Pen and ink, 17 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Bible Quilt

Bible Quilt

Harriet Powers finished her Bible Quilt around 1886 in Athens. The third panel in the second row depicts the story of Jacob's dream, when "he lay on the ground." Enslaved African Americans identified with Jacob, for he was homeless, hunted, and weary of his journey.

Courtesy of National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution

Harriet Powers

Harriet Powers

Only one image of Harriet Powers survives. The photograph, made about 1897, depicts her wearing a special apron with images of a moon, cross, and sun or shooting star. Celestial bodies such as these appear repeatedly in her quilts, indicating their importance to her.

Untitled (Music Series), 1978

Untitled (Music Series), 1978

Though her early work was realistic, Alma Thomas is best known for the brightly colored, mosaic-like style of abstraction that she adopted in her seventies. Acrylic on canvas, 71 5/8" x 52."

Courtesy of Smithsonian American Art Museum

Alma Thomas

Alma Thomas

The artist Alma Thomas stands before one of her distinctive abstract paintings. Thomas did not concentrate exclusively on making art until she was well into her sixties.

Courtesy of Charles Butler

Air View of a Spring Nursery (1966)

Air View of a Spring Nursery (1966)

This mosaic-like painting by Alma Thomas is an abstract representation of a plant nursery, as seen from above. Thomas was especially influenced by displays of azaleas she saw in Washington, D.C. Acrylic on canvas.

Courtesy of Columbus Museum

Spheroid (Figured Tulipwood)

Spheroid (Figured Tulipwood)

Spheroid (Figured Tulipwood) (1989) by Ed Moulthrop is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Wood, 16 x 23 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Ed Moulthrop

Ed Moulthrop

Ed Moulthrop, a master craftsman at wood turning, holds one of his highly polished bowls. Behind him are many other wood-turned bowls in his workshop.

Moulthrop and Wooden Bowl

Moulthrop and Wooden Bowl

The artist Ed Moulthrop is pictured with a work of art in process in his workshop. The wood-turned bowl, or urn, will eventually have a shiny surface, like his signature polished wood pieces.

Globe

Globe

Globe (1989) by Ed Moulthrop is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Wood, 6 x 10 (diameter) inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Bowl (Saturn)

Bowl (Saturn)

Bowl (Saturn) (1989) by Ed Moulthrop is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Wood, 10 x 8 (diameter) inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Bowl

Bowl

Bowl by Ed Moulthrop is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Wood (walnut), 5 x 8 1/2 (diameter) inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Bowl

Bowl

Bowl by Ed Moulthrop is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Wood (pine), 9 1/2 x 5 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Bowl

Bowl

Bowl by Ed Moulthrop is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Wood (pine)

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Round Plate

Round Plate

Earl McCutchen, an artist and instructor at the University of Georgia, used such glassworking techniques as slumping, fusing, and laminating to create plates and bowls. The photograph of this round plate was found in a 1960 issue of Craft Horizons; the date of its creation is unknown.

Courtesy of Georgia Museum of Art

Earl McCutchen

Earl McCutchen

Earl McCutchen, working on a ceramic vase. McCutchen taught at the University of Georgia art department for more than forty years.

Photograph by Wiley Sanderson

Ceramic Mugs

Ceramic Mugs

These ceramic mugs were created by Earl McCutchen, who was an expert in glaze properties and methods of glaze application.

Courtesy of Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia

Whirligigs

Whirligigs

The Brenau Art Galleries in Gainesville displayed a number of R. A. Miller's signature whirligigs in 2006. The exhibition, titled R. A. Miller: A Tribute, opened in February 2006, a month before the artist's death.

Photograph by Sarah E. McKee, New Georgia Encyclopedia

R. A. Miller

R. A. Miller

The folk artist R. A. Miller, pictured in 1991, walks among the hundreds of whirligigs on the hilltop of his property. Many of the metal cutouts feature moving parts, and some spin like windmills.

Speckled Trout

Speckled Trout

Metal cutouts, such as this speckled trout (circa 1996), figure prominently in the work of self-taught artist R. A. Miller. His cutouts often feature humans, angels, and animals, particularly bluebirds, chickens, pigs, and snakes.

Photograph by Richard Bernier

Bacchus No. 81

Bacchus No. 81

Elaine de Kooning began painting her Bacchus series during her tenure as Lamar Dodd Visiting Professor (1976-78) at the University of Georgia. Bacchus No. 81 (acrylic on canvas, 65 x 45 inches) was completed in 1983.

Courtesy of Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia; Gift of Marjorie and Edmond Luyckx, in Honor of Lamar Dodd, GMOA 1988.9

Elaine de Kooning

Elaine de Kooning

The artist Elaine de Kooning in 1984. She was at the heart of the so-called New York school, or abstract expressionism, in the late 1940s and 1950s.

Courtesy of Mount Holyoke College. Printmaking Workshop, South Hadley, Massachusetts

Baseball Players

Baseball Players

In this work, Baseball Players (1953), Elaine de Kooning demonstrates the abstract expressionist style born in New York in the 1950s (often called "action painting") to capture the excitement of America's favorite pastime. Her large, fervent brushstrokes evoke the dynamism of a split-second play while reflecting the artist's immersion in the abstract expressionist style. De Kooning was a visiting professor of art at the University of Georgia during the late 1970s.

Paradise Garden Wall

Paradise Garden Wall

The entrance to Howard Finster's outdoor sculpture garden, Paradise Garden, in Chattooga County features a concrete wall embedded with small toys, shards of glass and pottery, and various other found objects.

Photograph by Sarah E. McKee, New Georgia Encyclopedia

In Visions of Another World—September 15, 1990

In Visions of Another World—September 15, 1990

In Visions of Another World—September 15, 1990 (1990) by Howard Finster is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Enamel paint, 24 x 28 inches, with frame

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Howard Finster

Howard Finster

The Reverend Howard Finster was a visionary self-taught artist who emerged from the rural Appalachian culture of northeast Alabama and northwest Georgia to become one of America's most important creative personalities in the last quarter of the twentieth century.

Howard Finster

Howard Finster

Howard Finster, a self-taught artist from Chattooga County, sits atop his "Paradise Garden," a sculpture garden filled with mixed-media creations next to his home in Pennville. Finster began work on the garden in 1961.

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Photograph by Bud Lee..

Paradise Garden

Paradise Garden

In 1982 Howard Finster acquired a small church adjacent to his Paradise Garden in Chattooga County and transformed it into his "World's Folk Art Church." Pictured in 2014, the church and garden fell into serious disrepair after Finster's death, but restoration efforts began in 2010.

Photograph by Sarah E. McKee, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Howard Finster

Howard Finster

Howard Finster used various visual media to create his unique works of art.

Jacob’s Ladder

Jacob’s Ladder

Howard Finster's mural Jacob's Ladder is painted on the side of a building at Paradise Garden, his large outdoor art project in Chattooga County.

Photograph by Sarah E. McKee, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Angel #700.033

Angel #700.033

Angel #700.033 (1987) by Howard Finster is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Mixed media, 49 x 12 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Visions of Other Worlds in Outer Space Beyond #13,000.494

Visions of Other Worlds in Outer Space Beyond #13,000.494

Visions of Other Worlds in Outer Space Beyond #13,000.494 (1989) by Howard Finster is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Mixed media, 23 x 14 inches, with frame

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Bargain Basement

Bargain Basement (1937)

Lamar Dodd painted Bargain Basement in 1937.

Courtesy of the Morris Museum of Art

Washerwoman (1933)

Washerwoman (1933)

Lamar Dodd painted Washerwoman in 1933. Oil on canvas, 24" x 31 1/2"

Courtesy of Lamar Dodd Art Center, LaGrange College

Lamar Dodd

Lamar Dodd

The painter Lamar Dodd at work in his studio in the 1970s. Dodd was the most influential Georgia artist of his generation.

Courtesy of LaGrange College

Lamar Dodd

Lamar Dodd

The artist Lamar Dodd pictured with one of his paintings in the late 1970s. Dodd was the most recognized artist of his generation from the state of Georgia, a passionate advocate for the arts, and a skilled administrator.

Courtesy of LaGrange College

Cotton Pickers (ca. 1940)

Cotton Pickers (ca. 1940)

Lamar Dodd painted Cotton Pickers around 1940. Watercolor, 9 1/2" x 14"

Courtesy of Lamar Dodd Art Center, LaGrange College

Carnival at Night (1939)

Carnival at Night (1939)

Lamar Dodd painted Carnival at Night in 1939. Oil on canvas, 24" x 30"

Courtesy of Lamar Dodd Art Center, LaGrange College

Copperhill (1938)

Copperhill (1938)

Lamar Dodd, founder of the art school at the University of Georgia in Athens, painted Copperhill (oil and egg tempera on linen canvas) in 1938. The painting is characteristic of the evocative landscapes that dominated his work in the 1930s and early 1940s.

Courtesy of Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia. Extended loan from the University of Georgia Foundation; Gift of Mary and Lamar Dodd GMOA 1974.3F

Alfred Heber Holbrook (ca. 1948-49)

Alfred Heber Holbrook (ca. 1948-49)

Alfred Heber Holbrook (ca. 1948-49), by Lamar Dodd. Oil on canvas, 27 5/8" x 36". Gift of Mary and Lamar Dodd. Holbrook was the founder of the Georgia Museum of Art in Athens.

Courtesy of Georgia Museum of Art

Anchored Boats

Anchored Boats

Anchored Boats (1989) by Lamar Dodd is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Watercolor, 30 1/4 x 24 1/4 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Gunnison’s Gorge

Gunnison’s Gorge

Gunnison's Gorge by Lamar Dodd is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Print, 27 x 20 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Rocks in Nature’s Garden

Rocks in Nature’s Garden

Rocks in Nature's Garden (1963) by Lamar Dodd is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Watercolor, 28 x 20 1/2 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

San Marco, Rain

San Marco, Rain

San Marco, Rain (1972) by Lamar Dodd is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Watercolor, 18 x 23 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

St. Mark’s Cathedral

St. Mark’s Cathedral

St. Mark's Cathedral (1956) by Lamar Dodd was one of a series of paintings the Georgia artist made of the famous Venetian cathedral. It is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Print, 16 x 24 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

Venice Reflection, Rain

Venice Reflection, Rain

Venice Reflection, Rain (1958) by Lamar Dodd is part of Georgia's State Art Collection. Oil, 20 x 30 inches

Courtesy of Georgia Council for the Arts, Georgia's State Art Collection.

River Plantation

River Plantation

British artist Thomas Addison Richards painted River Plantation (1855-60) from sketches made in Georgia during his travels through the South in the 1840s. Oil on canvas (20 1/4" x 30").

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art

Self-Portrait by Thomas Addison Richards

Self-Portrait by Thomas Addison Richards

In 1838 Thomas Addison Richards traveled to Georgia to paint portraits of the McKinne family in Augusta. During his stay, he fell ill and decided to paint his own portrait while recuperating. This is one of his three known self-portraits.

Courtesy of Madonna Owen Bryans (Mrs. C. I. Bryans Jr.)

Tallulah Falls

Tallulah Falls

Thomas Addison Richards's sketch of Tallulah Falls in northeast Georgia appeared in Georgia Illustrated (1842). The sketch is one of many natural wonders drawn by Richards.

From Georgia Illustrated, by T. A. Richards and W. C. Richards

Encountering an Alligator

Encountering an Alligator

In Encountering an Alligator, Thomas Addison Richards captures the native beauty associated with a southern swamp. Central to the painting are the live oak trees laden with Spanish moss, pointy cypress knees, and lush riverbank rich with plant life. This work was reproduced as a steel engraving in 1859, in "Ricelands of the South," for Harper's Magazine.

Courtesy of Morris Museum of Art