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Explore Georgia’s rich music history

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Rhodes Hall

Rhodes Hall

Rhodes Hall in Atlanta (1903) is a late example of picturesque Victorian, with its irregular floor plan and massive exterior features in the Romanesque Revival style, accented with castlelike, crenellated towers and parapets. It is one of the finest examples of W. F. Denny's residential work.

Image from Lars Juhl Jensen

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Telfair Hospital for Females

Telfair Hospital for Females

The Telfair Hospital for Females, in Savannah, was built in 1884 in the Italianate style by the architectural firm of Fay and Eichberg. Funding for the hospital was provided for in Mary Telfair's will, and by 1960, when it merged with Candler General Hospital, the facility had become the longest-operating women's hospital in the country.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey, Photograph by Walter Smalling Jr..

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Powell Building, Milledgeville

Powell Building, Milledgeville

The Powell Building, or Central Building, is part of the Central State Hospital in Milledgeville. Built in 1856, the Greek revival building was designed by Calvin Fay, later of Fay and Eichberg.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

Davis House

Davis House

The Charles A. Davis residence in Greensboro was built in 1874, in the Italianate style, by Calvin Fay and Dewitt Bruyn.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

Brunswick City Hall

Brunswick City Hall

The Brunswick City Hall was built in 1889 in the Romanesque Revival style by architect Alfred S. Eichberg, who had been in a successful practice with Calvin Fay.

Image from Renégat

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Tiedeman House

Tiedeman House

Architect Alfred Eichberg designed a double house for the Tiedeman brothers in Savannah in 1892. The house is a fine example of the Romanesque Revival style, at which Eichberg excelled.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

Eichberg Hall

Eichberg Hall

Eichberg Hall, designed by the firm of Fay and Eichberg and built in 1887 for the Central of Georgia Railway, today houses the architecture program at the Savannah College of Art and Design.

Image from Ebyabe

J. S. Wood House

J. S. Wood House

Alfred Eichberg's historic J. S. Wood House (1891) in Savannah is an example of Georgia's Romanesque Revival period of architecture.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

Schwarz Building

Schwarz Building

This Romanesque Revival building, designed by Alfred S. Eichberg, was constructed in 1890 on Bull Street in Savannah. Formerly known as the Schwarz Building, it has housed a number of different businesses over the years.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

St. John’s Episcopal Church

St. John’s Episcopal Church

One of the first Gothic revival churches in the state was St. John's Episcopal in Savannah, designed in 1850 by New York architect Calvin Otis and supervised by architect Calvin Fay. St. John's has distinctive pointed arches, buttresses, and great hammerbeam trusses on its interior.

Image from Jud McCranie

Newton County Courthouse

Newton County Courthouse

The Newton County Courthouse in Covington was built in 1884 on the site of the previous courthouse. The building was designed in the Second Empire style by Bruce and Morgan, the most successful architectural firm in Georgia of its time.

Courtesy of Don Bowman

Agnes Scott Hall

Agnes Scott Hall

The Agnes Scott (Main) Hall (1889), of Agnes Scott College in Decatur, was designed by the firm Bruce and Morgan.

Image from Atcharles

Empire Building

Empire Building

Bruce and Morgan's Empire Building (1901), influenced by the Chicago style of architecture, was the first steel-framed structure to be built in Atlanta. In 1929 Philip Shutze redesigned the three lower floors, giving the building a Beaux-Arts character.

From AIA Guide to the Architecture of Atlanta

Alexander Bruce

Alexander Bruce

One of the first fellows of the American Institute of Architects to practice in Georgia, Alexander Bruce formed the firm Bruce and Morgan with Thomas Henry Morgan in 1882. The successful firm was known for its design of large civic buildings as well as public school structures.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

William Parkins

William Parkins

Parkins was the most significant architect practicing in Georgia in the immediate post-Civil War decades until he retired from his Atlanta business in the late 1880s.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

Atlanta's Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, built in 1873-80, helped to establish William H. Parkins as one of Georgia's leading architects. More than a century later, in 1982-84, the building was restored by architect Henry Howard Smith, the son of renowned Atlanta architect Francis Palmer Smith, after the church was damaged by fire.

Image from Warren LeMay

Kimball House Hotel

Kimball House Hotel

William Parkins's original Kimball House Hotel (1869-70), a combination of Italianate and Second Empire architecture, burned in 1883.

Image from Jolomo~commonswiki

Windsor Hotel

Windsor Hotel

G. L. Norrman's historic Windsor Hotel (1892) in Americus, Georgia, is an outstanding example of High Victorian or Queen Anne architecture.

G. L. Norrman

G. L. Norrman

Swedish-born Norrman, after coming to Atlanta in 1881, designed a wide array of buildings in the most fashionable styles, using the latest technologies. Norrman worked ceaselessly for the professionalization of architecture in Georgia and the South.

Image from Col. I.W. Avery

Edward C. Peters House

Edward C. Peters House

G. L. Norrman's Edward C. Peters House (1884, restoration and additions 1973), on Ponce de Leon Avenue, is the finest illustration of the Queen Anne style remaining in Atlanta.

Image from Warren LeMay

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Citizens Bank Building, Savannah

Citizens Bank Building, Savannah

The Citizens Bank Building (1895) in Savannah was designed by architect G. L. Norrman in the Beaux-Arts style. It was the first fireproof building in Savannah. Today, the structure is known as Propes Hall, of the Savannah College of Art and Design.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

Equitable Building

Equitable Building

John Wellborn Root's eight-story Equitable Building in Atlanta, built in the early 1890s for the developer Joel Hurt, was demolished in 1971, just as Georgia's historic preservation movement was getting under way. Its steel-frame construction and monumental presence made it the city's pioneer skyscraper.

John Wellborn Root

John Wellborn Root

Georgia native John Wellborn Root, one of the key figures in the nationally significant Chicago School of skyscraper design, won praise for his elaborate Equitable Building (1890, razed) in Atlanta.

Edmund G. Lind

Edmund G. Lind

Born and trained in England, Lind became an elder statesman for architecture in the emerging New South. His Atlanta practice ranged from simple textile mill housing for the Fulton Bag and Cotton Mill to grand Peachtree Street mansions, factories, libraries, commercial buildings, and churches.

Courtesy of SMDA Architects, Baltimore, MD

Central Presbyterian Church

Central Presbyterian Church

Many consider the English Gothic–style Central Presbyterian Church in Atlanta (1885) to be architect Edmund G. Lind's greatest building.

Image from Warren LeMay

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Gwinnett County Courthouse

Gwinnett County Courthouse

The Gwinnett County courthouse, built in 1885 in Lawrenceville, is one of architect Edmund Lind's many important buildings in Georgia.

Courtesy of Don Bowman

Old Governor’s Mansion

Old Governor’s Mansion

The Old Governor's Mansion in Milledgeville (1838), designed by architect Charles Cluskey, is an example of Greek revival, an architectural style common throughout the state well into the 1850s. The mansion is now part of Georgia College and State University.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Austin Leyden Residence

Austin Leyden Residence

Architect John Boutell's Austin Leyden House (1858, razed), at 124 Peachtree Street in Atlanta, was unusually grand and ambitious for the prewar railroad town. Ionic columns surrounding the front and sides of the house epitomize the Greek motif of the time.

Courtesy of Elizabeth A. Lyon

Central Presbyterian Church, Atlanta

Central Presbyterian Church, Atlanta

Central Presbyterian Church (1885) in Atlanta was designed by architect Edmund G. Lind in the Gothic revival style. The front facade consists of rough-cut limestone, and the rest of the structure consists of brick. The original stained-glass windows have been retained.

Image from JJonahJackalope

Hay House

Hay House

The Hay House (1855-59) in Macon is an elaborate example of the Italianate style.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Geoff L. Johnson.

Hay House (detail)

Hay House (detail)

Macon's 18,000-square-foot Hay House (1855-60) spans four levels and is crowned by a three-story cupola.

Fine Arts Building

Fine Arts Building

One of the most highly praised and admired buildings at the 1895 Cotton States and International Exposition in Atlanta was the Beaux-Arts style Fine Arts Building, a monumentally symmetrical and classical building by W. T. Downing.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke