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Explore Georgia’s rich music history

From blues and soul to classical and country—our Spotify playlists feature 130+ songs written and performed by Georgians.

Cecil Alexander

Cecil Alexander

As part of the top 10 percent of naval aviators, Cecil Alexander volunteered for the marines and became a dive bomber pilot during World War II. The future Atlanta architect flew a total of sixty missions and was twice awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Courtesy of Cecil Alexander

Cecil Alexander

Cecil Alexander

A prominent Atlanta architect and principal of the FABRAP architectural firm before his retirement, Cecil Alexander was a leader in the movement to desegregate Atlanta's public housing and businesses. He is pictured in 2008.

Reprinted by permission of Stephen H. Moore (http://www.shmoore.com/)

BellSouth Telecommunications Building

BellSouth Telecommunications Building

The BellSouth Telecommunications Building, located at 675 West Peachtree Street in Atlanta, was built in 1980 by the Atlanta-based firm FABRAP, in conjunction with Skidmore Owings and Merrill of New York. It served as headquarters for both Southern Bell and BellSouth. In 2006 BellSouth was absorbed by AT&T, and today the building is part of the AT&T Midtown Center.

Courtesy of AT&T

Coca-Cola Headquarters

Coca-Cola Headquarters

Coca-Cola's headquarters in Atlanta, designed by the architectural firm FABRAP, house the corporate offices as well as the offices for the Coca-Cola Foundation.

Photograph by David A. Pike

Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium

The Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium hosts the opening night of the World Series in October 1995. The stadium, jointly designed by the architecture firms FABRAP and Heery and Heery, was completed in 1965 and attracted two professional teams, the Atlanta Braves and the Atlanta Falcons, to the city.

Helen and Cecil Alexander

Helen and Cecil Alexander

The architect Cecil Alexander, a founding partner of the firm FABRAP, and his second wife, Helen, pictured at their home in Atlanta in 2007.

Reprinted by permission of Stephen H. Moore (http://www.shmoore.com/)

Hyatt Regency Hotel

Hyatt Regency Hotel

The Hyatt Regency Hotel in Atlanta, designed by John Portman, was completed in 1967. The structure features a twenty-two-story lobby and served as a model for other atrium hotels built in the 1970s and after.

Courtesy of Hyatt Press Photo Library

John Portman

John Portman

John Portman, pictured in 2006, is a graduate of the architecture school at Georgia Tech and founder of the Atlanta firm Portman and Associates. Portman designed numerous buildings in the city, including the Peachtree Center Office Building, Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel, and Atlanta Marriott Marquis.

Peachtree Center

Peachtree Center

Architect John Portman is pictured circa 1975 in his Peachtree Center, a multipurpose business complex built in Atlanta in 1965.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Big Bethel AME

Big Bethel AME

Big Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, located on Auburn Avenue in Atlanta, is pictured circa 1979. In 1924 builder Alexander D. Hamilton and architect John A. Lankford completed reconstruction on the church, after the original building burned in 1923.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Alexander D. Hamilton

Alexander D. Hamilton

Prominent Atlanta builder Alexander D. Hamilton, circa 1919. Hamilton and his father, Alexander Hamilton, formed the contracting firm Alexander Hamilton and Son in 1890.

Image from Richardson, Clement , ed. (1919) The National Cyclopedia of the Colored Race, Montgomery: National Publishing Company, Inc.

Butler Street YMCA

Butler Street YMCA

The Butler Street YMCA in Atlanta, pictured circa 1975, was built in 1916 by contractor Alexander D. Hamilton, working for the firm Hentz, Reid, and Adler of Atlanta, and architect Neel Reid. Known as the "Black City Hall of Atlanta," the YMCA's early members included civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

Courtesy of Archives Division, Auburn Avenue Research Library on African American Culture and History, Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System, Ann States Collection.

Techwood Homes Dedication

Techwood Homes Dedication

U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt speaks in Atlanta at the dedication ceremony for Techwood Homes, the nation's first public housing project, on November 29, 1935.

Techwood Homes

Techwood Homes

Techwood Homes, pictured in 1948, was the first public housing project built in the United States. Completed in 1936, the project was located northwest of downtown Atlanta and offered row houses, garden apartments, and playgrounds for 604 white families. Techwood Homes was not integrated until 1968.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Kenneth Rogers Photograph Collection.

Techwood Flats

Techwood Flats

An unidentified woman stands outside her home in Techwood Flats, an impoverished Atlanta neighborhood, circa 1930. Techwood Flats was razed in 1934 to make way for Techwood Homes, the first public housing project in the nation. Many of the neighborhood's Black residents were never rehoused.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Kenneth Rogers Photograph Collection.

Techwood Homes Dedication

Techwood Homes Dedication

Crowds gather at Grant Field, located on the campus of Georgia Tech in Atlanta, on November 29, 1935, for the dedication of Techwood Homes, the nation's first public housing project. U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered an address and turned on electricity to the homes during the dedication ceremony.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Kenneth Rogers Photograph Collection.

Techwood Homes Construction

Techwood Homes Construction

Construction teams complete work on a storm sewer in 1936 for Techwood Homes, the nation's first public housing project, which opened in Atlanta that same year. Designed by the architectural firm Burge and Stevens, Techwood Homes was developed by the federal Public Works Administration.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Kenneth Rogers Photograph Collection.

Techwood Homes

Techwood Homes

Children, pictured in 1948, play football on the grounds of Techwood Homes, the nation's first public housing project. Completed in Atlanta in 1936, Techwood Homes provided residents with open space and lush landscaping, as well as homes featuring the latest electrical appliances.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center, Kenneth Rogers Photograph Collection.

Promenade Two

Promenade Two

The Promenade Two tower, built in Midtown Atlanta in 1990, was designed by the architectural firm Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback, and Associates. A steel spire tops the thirty-eight-story building, which is covered in rose-colored glass.

Photograph by Mary Ann Sullivan

Omni Coliseum

Omni Coliseum

The Omni Coliseum, an arena completed in 1972, was the first major project for the Atlanta architectural firm Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback, and Associates. The arena held 16,500 spectators and was home to the Atlanta Hawks basketball team, as well as the site for numerous other sporting events and concerts.

Postcard from Scenic Card Company, Bessemer, Alabama. Photograph by J. H. Robinson

Georgia World Congress Center

Georgia World Congress Center

The Georgia World Congress Center, viewed from the south, was built in Atlanta in 1976 by the architectural firm Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback, and Associates. By 2002 the center had expanded to include more than 1 million square feet.

Photograph by Mary Ann Sullivan

UPS Foundation

UPS Foundation

The UPS Foundation headquarters are located in Atlanta at the UPS corporate office building, designed by the architectural firm Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback, and Associates. The foundation, which was established in 1951, provides grant money to organizations working to combat hunger and illiteracy, and also encourages volunteerism among UPS employees.

Courtesy of UPS

Southern Bell Telephone Building

Southern Bell Telephone Building

The original Southern Bell Telephone Building in Atlanta, pictured in 2008, was designed by architect P. Thornton Marye in the late 1920s. The art deco-style building was advertised as the city's "first modernistic skyscraper." The building's original six stories were extended to fourteen in the 1940s and topped with a tower in the 1960s.

Photograph by Mary Ann Sullivan

Atlanta Terminal Station

Atlanta Terminal Station

The Atlanta Terminal Station, pictured circa 1905, was designed in a Renaissance revival style by architect P. Thornton Marye. The structure, a pioneer work in reinforced concrete, was razed in 1971.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ful0100.

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Atlanta Terminal Station

Atlanta Terminal Station

Passengers walk through the Atlanta Terminal Station in 1967, four years before the structure was demolished. The station, built in 1905, was designed by architect P. Thornton Marye.

Courtesy of George Lane

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Atlanta, pictured in 2005, was built in 1906. The church was designed in the Gothic revival style by architect P. Thornton Marye, in association with A. Ten Eyck Brown.

Courtesy of Atlanta Time Machine

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

The Fox Theatre in Atlanta, pictured from the south in 2002, was originally designed as the Yaraab Temple by the architectural firm Marye, Alger, and Vinour. The building opened as a theater in 1929.

Photograph by Mary Ann Sullivan

United Way Parking Garage

United Way Parking Garage

Designed jointly by the architectural firms Stanley, Love-Stanley, and Thompson, Ventulett, and Stainback (TVS), the United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta parking garage received an Atlanta Urban Design Commission award in 1996.

Courtesy of Stanley, Love-Stanley, P.C.

William J. Stanley III

William J. Stanley III

William J. "Bill" Stanley, a native of Atlanta, was the first African American to graduate from Georgia Tech with a degree in architecture. In 1978 he and his wife, Ivenue Love-Stanley, established the architectural firm Stanley, Love-Stanley in Atlanta, where he handles marketing and design.

Courtesy of Stanley, Love-Stanley, P.C.

Ivenue Love-Stanley

Ivenue Love-Stanley

Ivenue Love-Stanley, a native of Mississippi, was the first African American woman to receive a degree in architecture from Georgia Tech. She is the cofounder, with her husband, Bill Stanley, of the Atlanta architectural firm Stanley, Love-Stanley, for which she serves as business manager and principal in charge of production.

Courtesy of Stanley, Love-Stanley, P.C.

Horizon Sanctuary

Horizon Sanctuary

Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta is currently housed in the Horizon Sanctuary, which seats 2,000 people and is situated across the street from the historic church building, today known as the Heritage Sanctuary. The Horizon Sanctuary was desiged by the Atlanta firm Stanley, Love-Stanley.

Lyke House Chapel

Lyke House Chapel

The Lyke House Catholic Student Center at the Atlanta University Center was built in 1999 by the architectural firm Stanley, Love-Stanley. The center includes a chapel (pictured), as well as a student center and priest's rectory.

Courtesy of Stanley, Love-Stanley, P.C.

Atlanta City Hall

Atlanta City Hall

Atlanta City Hall, pictured in 1942, was designed by G. Lloyd Preacher in the neo-Gothic style. Completed in 1930, the building stands at the corner of Washington and Mitchell streets.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # ful0154.

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University Hospital

University Hospital

University Hospital in Augusta, pictured in the 1920s, was designed by Atlanta architect G. Lloyd Preacher. The building was completed in 1915 and razed in 1991.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ric003.

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Briarcliff Hotel

Briarcliff Hotel

Architect G. Lloyd Preacher's Briarcliff Hotel, also known as the "Seven Fifty," was built in Atlanta on the corner of Ponce de Leon and North Highland avenues in 1924-25.

Georgia Dome

Georgia Dome

The Georgia Dome in Atlanta was designed by architect George T. Heery's firm in collaboration with Rosser Fabrap International (formerly FABRAP). Completed in 1992 and demolished in 2017, the stadium was home to the Atlanta Falcons football team and also served as a venue for numerous other events.

Image from Michael Barera

Georgia Power Building

Georgia Power Building

The Georgia Power Building in downtown Atlanta, designed by Heery Architects and Engineers, houses the headquarters for both the Georgia Power Company and the Georgia Power Foundation. In 2004 the Georgia Power Foundation awarded $5 million in grants to organizations primarily in the state of Georgia.

Image from Counse

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Atlanta History Museum

Atlanta History Museum

The Atlanta History Museum, located on the campus of the Atlanta History Center, is one of the Southeast's largest history museums. The 30,000-square-foot facility, designed by architect George T. Heery, opened in 1993 and houses four permanent exhibitions, as well as two galleries for traveling exhibitions.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

J. W. Golucke

J. W. Golucke

J. W. Golucke was born in June 1857. Working from Atlanta, he built thirty-one county courthouses in Georgia and Alabama. 

Courtesy of Union County Historical Society

Old DeKalb County Courthouse

Old DeKalb County Courthouse

DeKalb County's fourth courthouse, built in 1916 and known today as the Old Courthouse, sits on the historic square in Decatur. A small park and bandstand surround the building, which today houses the DeKalb History Center. The courthouse, pictured in 2003, was designed by J. W. Golucke, the most prolific architect of Georgia courthouses.

Photograph by Melinda G. Smith, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Henry County Courthouse

Henry County Courthouse

The Henry County Courthouse in McDonough, designed in the Romanesque revival style by architect J. W. Golucke, was completed in 1897. A Confederate monument stands in front of the courthouse, which was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

Courtesy of Don Bowman

Coweta County Courthouse

Coweta County Courthouse

The Coweta County courthouse, located in Newnan, was built in 1904. The structure, designed by J. W. Golucke in the neoclassical revival style, was refurbished in 1975, and both its interior and exterior were rehabilitated in 1989-90.

Courtesy of Don Bowman

Fitzpatrick Hotel

Fitzpatrick Hotel

The Fitzpatrick Hotel, pictured in 2006, is a historic hotel in Washington, the seat of Wilkes County. The building, constructed in 1898, is credited to architect J. W. Golucke, a native of Wilkes County.

Courtesy of the Fitzpatrick Hotel

Georgia Archives

Georgia Archives

The Georgia Archives building, built in 1965 on Capitol Avenue in downtown Atlanta, was designed by A. Thomas Bradbury, the architect for several government buildings around the state capitol. In 2003 the archives relocated to a new site in Morrow.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives.

Yaarab Shrine Temple

Yaarab Shrine Temple

The Yaarab Shrine Temple in Atlanta is pictured in 1965, the year of its completion. The temple was designed by Atlanta architect A. Thomas Bradbury.

Labor Building

Labor Building

The Labor Building in Atlanta, pictured in 1955, was designed by A. Thomas Bradbury, a native of the city and graduate of the architecture school at Georgia Tech. Bradbury also designed the buildings housing the departments of human resources and transportation in Atlanta.

Governor’s Mansion

Governor’s Mansion

The Governor's Mansion, completed in 1967, was designed in the Greek revival style by Atlanta architect A. Thomas Bradbury. The thirty-room home, located in the Buckhead area of Atlanta, was first occupied by Governor Lester Maddox.

Photograph from Georgia.gov

Charles E. Choate

Charles E. Choate

Charles E. Choate, a native of Houston County, was a Methodist minister and architect in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He designed several churches throughout the state, as well as commercial buildings and residences, particularly in Washington County.

Courtesy of the Washington County Chamber of Commerce

Tennille Baptist Church

Tennille Baptist Church

Tennille Baptist Church, pictured in the 1960s, was built in Washington County in 1900. The building was designed in the Romanesque revival style by Georgia architect Charles E. Choate, who was also a Methodist minister.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #was365.

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Tennille Banking Company

Tennille Banking Company

The building for the Tennille Banking Company, pictured circa 1915, was designed by Georgia architect Charles E. Choate and completed in 1900. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1994.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
was277.

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High Museum of Art

High Museum of Art

The High Museum of Art, located on Peachtree Street in Midtown Atlanta, houses a permanent collection of more than 11,000 pieces, including nineteenth- and twentieth-century American collections, folk art, and African art. Its current building, designed in 1983 by Richard Meier, has received awards and honors for its architectural excellence.

Courtesy of High Museum of Art

Georgia Railroad Bank Building

Georgia Railroad Bank Building

The Georgia Railroad Bank Building, known today as the Wells Fargo Building, was erected in 1967 on Broad Street in Augusta to serve as headquarters for the First Railroad and Banking Company of Georgia. The building was designed by architect Robert McCreary.

Courtesy of Augusta Richmond County Historical Society, Reese Library Loose Photographs Collection, Broad Street Series.

High Museum of Art

High Museum of Art

Designed by Richard Meier in the modernist style, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta was completed in 1983. In 2005 an addition to the museum, designed by architect Renzo Piano, opened to the public.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Save the Fox Campaign

Save the Fox Campaign

A "Save the Fox" poster from 1976 advertises "An Evening at the Fox" fund-raising event held by Delta Zeta sorority. During the 1970s, the theater was threatened with demolition, but efforts by Atlanta historic preservation groups prevented its destruction.

Courtesy of Fox Theatre. Copyright Delta Zeta Sorority

Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

Atlanta's Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, built in 1873-80, helped to establish William H. Parkins as one of Georgia's leading architects. More than a century later, in 1982-84, the building was restored by architect Henry Howard Smith, the son of renowned Atlanta architect Francis Palmer Smith, after the church was damaged by fire.

Image from Warren LeMay

Muscogee County Courthouse

Muscogee County Courthouse

The Muscogee County Courthouse in Columbus was constructed in the early 1970s, after the Columbus and Muscogee governments merged to form a consolidated government. Designed by Edward W. Neal, the building is an example of the New Formalist style of modern architecture.

Courtesy of Don Bowman

Architecture Building

Architecture Building

The architecture building at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, completed in 1979, is an example of the Brutalist style of modern architecture. It was designed by architect Cooper Carry.

Photograph by Aria Ritz Finkelstein

Michael C. Carlos Museum

Michael C. Carlos Museum

The Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University in Atlanta, designed by notable architect Michael Graves, offers numerous lectures, workshops, and performances as part of its educational program. Around 20,000 Georgia children visit the museum each year, and many more participate in Art Odyssey, the museum's outreach program.

Image from Gary Todd

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Cathedral of St. Philip

Cathedral of St. Philip

The Cathedral of St. Philip, completed in 1962, was the last work of Atlanta architect Francis Palmer Smith. Built during the modernist era of architecture, the cathedral is an example of Gothic revival, demonstrating the stylistic pluralism of the period.

Photograph by Darby Carl Sanders

Virginia Highland Bungalow

Virginia Highland Bungalow

Built in the 1920s on Rupley Street in Virginia Highland, an Atlanta neighborhood, this home is an example of the architecture inspired by Gustav Stickley through his magazine, The Craftsman, published from 1901 until 1916.

Savannah Post Office

Savannah Post Office

The post office in Savannah, pictured circa 1900, was built in 1898 at the corner of Bull and Whitaker streets. Architect William Aiken designed the building in the Renaissance-revival style.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # ctm087.

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Sand Hills

Sand Hills

Women play badminton at the home of Dr. Hickman in Sand Hills, an Augusta neighborhood, circa 1898. During the late Victorian period (1895-1920), smaller cottages in the Sand Hills area were replaced with larger homes.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # ric158.

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Ansley Park

Ansley Park

Ansley Park, a late-Victorian suburban development in Atlanta, was established in 1904. During the first two decades of the twentieth century, several new neighborhoods grew up around downtown Atlanta, including Druid Hills, Morningside, Garden Hills, and Brookwood.

Image from Warren LeMay

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Ponce de Leon Apartments

Ponce de Leon Apartments

The Ponce de Leon Apartments, designed by W. L. Stoddart and completed in 1913, was the premier apartment building in Atlanta during the late Victorian period.

Georgian Terrace Hotel

Georgian Terrace Hotel

Designed by W. L. Stoddart, the Georgian Terrace Hotel was one of several luxury hotels built across the South during the late Victorian period. Completed in 1911 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the hotel continues to operate.

Windsor Hotel

Windsor Hotel

The Windsor Hotel (1892) in Americus was designed by G. L. Norrman in the Queen Anne style. It was conceived as an attraction for wealthy northerners looking for summer accommodations. The hotel was renovated and restored in the early 1990s.

Image from Wikimedia Commons

Piedmont Hotel

Piedmont Hotel

The Piedmont Hotel, built in Atlanta in 1903, was known to the city's residents as "our New York Hotel." Designed by W. F. Denny, a native of Jefferson County, the hotel was demolished in the 1960s.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Briarcliff Hotel

Briarcliff Hotel

The Briarcliff Hotel in Atlanta, pictured in 1979, was designed by G. Lloyd Preacher. Also known as the "Seven Fifty," the hotel was built on the corner of Ponce de Leon and North Highland avenues in 1924-25.

Equitable Building

Equitable Building

Considered to be Atlanta's first skyscraper, the eight-story Equitable Building (1892, razed in 1971) was designed by John Wellborn Root in the Chicago School style. It was the first fireproof office building in the Southeast, and is the only building Root designed in Georgia.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey, #HABS GA,61-ATLA,13--1.

Flatiron Building

Flatiron Building

The Flatiron Building, pictured in 1911, is the oldest standing skyscraper in Atlanta. Built in 1897, the building was designed by Bradford Gilbert, a New York architect.

Savannah Volunteer Guards Armory

Savannah Volunteer Guards Armory

The Savannah Volunteer Guards Armory (photographed here circa 1902) was designed by William G. Preston in the Romanesque revival style. The Savannah College of Art and Design purchased the Bull Street structure in 1979. After restoration, the building was renamed Poetter Hall for two of the school's cofounders.

Courtesy of Georgia Southern University, Image from Art Work of Savannah and Augusta, Georgia

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Empire Building

Empire Building

Bruce and Morgan's Empire Building (1901), influenced by the Chicago style of architecture, was the first steel-framed structure to be built in Atlanta. In 1929 Philip Shutze redesigned the three lower floors, giving the building a Beaux-Arts character.

From AIA Guide to the Architecture of Atlanta

Carnegie Education Pavilion

Carnegie Education Pavilion

From left (inside arch), Corporation for Olympic Development in Atlanta president Clara Axam, Georgia State University president Carl Patton, Atlanta mayor Bill Campbell, and Spelman College president Johnnetta Cole attend the 1997 dedication of the Carnegie Education Pavilion in Atlanta. The arch, designed by Henri Jova, incorporates a fragment of the Carnegie Library, built in Atlanta by Ackerman and Ross in 1900-1902.

Peachtree Arcade

Peachtree Arcade

Evangelist minister Billy Graham holds a noon prayer meeting at the Peachtree Arcade in Atlanta during his six-week crusade to the city in 1950. The arcade, built in 1916-17, is an example of the Beaux-Arts style of architecture popular during the late Victorian period. It was designed by A. Ten Eyck Brown, a prominent Atlanta architect.

Atlanta Terminal Station

Atlanta Terminal Station

Atlanta's Terminal Station, pictured in 1955, was designed in the Beaux-Arts style by P. Thornton Marye. Completed in 1905, the station was renovated and expanded in 1947.

Georgia State Prison

Georgia State Prison

The Georgia Industrial Institute, later the Georgia State Prison, in Reidsville was completed in 1936. Pictured in 2013, the building was designed by the Atlanta architectural firm Tucker and Howell.

Courtesy of Robert M. Craig

Grady Memorial Hospital

Grady Memorial Hospital

The design for Grady Memorial Hospital, pictured here in 2014, was completed in 1948 and construction was completed in 1958. Robert and Company designed the building in the modern style.

Courtesy of Robert M. Craig

The Varsity

The Varsity

The Varsity restaurant, pictured here in 2009, first opened in Atlanta in 1928. In 1940 it was renovated by architect Jules Grey in the streamlined modern style.

Courtesy of Robert M. Craig

Hinman Research Building

Hinman Research Building

The Hinman Research Building, built in 1939 as part of the "academic village" at Georgia Tech, was designed in the Bauhaus modern style by Paul M. Heffernan. Today the building houses the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences.

Hightower Textile Engineering Building

Hightower Textile Engineering Building

Designed by architect Paul Heffernan, the Hightower Building (1948-49, razed) was part of a Bauhaus-inspired, Early Modern-styled "academic village" on the campus of the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

Briar Hills Apartments

Briar Hills Apartments

The Briar Hills Apartments, built in 1946-47, are an example of the modern architectural aesthetic. The apartments, known today as Briar Hills Condominiums, are located on the border of the Druid Hills and Virginia Highland neighborhoods in Atlanta.

Image from James Lin

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Birdsville

Birdsville

The original home of Francis Jones, a colonial settler in Georgia, stands on the site of his Birdsville plantation in Jenkins County and represents one of the few colonial residential dwellings still standing in the state. The home was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bur068.

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Fort Frederica

Fort Frederica

The tabby ruins of Fort Frederica, which was established by James Oglethorpe in 1736 on St. Simons Island, are among the oldest architectural remnants left from the colonial period in the state.

Image from UncleBucko

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Midway

Midway

The Midway Congregational Church was erected in 1792 to replace a church built by Puritans in 1756. The walled cemetery on the church grounds is the only remaining structure that dates from the colonial community at Midway.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Bethesda

Bethesda

A drawing of the Bethesda orphan home in Savannah, built in 1740 by Anglican deacon George Whitefield, depicts the hipped roof and piazzas of the original structure, which burned in 1773.

Courtesy of Bethesda School for Boys

Ellamae Ellis League

Ellamae Ellis League

Renowned Georgia architect Ellamae Ellis League (right) looks over building plans with her daughter Jean in 1952. A native of Macon, League was a practicing architect in that city from 1922 until 1975. At the time of her death in 1991, she was the only woman in Georgia admitted as a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.

Ballard-Hudson High School

Ballard-Hudson High School

Ballard-Hudson High School in Bibb County was designed by Ellamae Ellis League, who opened her own architecture practice in Macon in 1934. Before her retirement in 1975, League designed many churches, schools, and hospitals, which were reportedly her favorite projects.

Ellamae Ellis League

Ellamae Ellis League

Ellamae Ellis League stands at the construction site for the Macon-Bibb County Health Center in 1957. League, a prominent Macon architect, designed this building, as well as numerous other structures in the Macon area.

Grand Opera House

Grand Opera House

In 1968, seven years before her retirement, renowned architect Ellamae Ellis League began restoration work on the Grand Opera House in Macon. That same year, League was elected as a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects. She was one of only eight female fellows by the time of her death in 1991.

Image from Mark Strozier

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Federal Reserve Bank Building

Federal Reserve Bank Building

Henrietta Dozier, the first female architect in Georgia, served as associate and supervising architect for the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, constructed in 1923-24 in Jacksonville, Florida. The exterior of the building, which was designed in a Neoclassical Revival style, has remained nearly unchanged since the time of its completion.

From Jacksonville's Architectural Heritage, by W. W. Wood. Photograph by Judy Davis and David Vedas

Henrietta Dozier

Henrietta Dozier

Henrietta Dozier was the first woman in Georgia to work as a professional architect, and she was a founding member of the Atlanta Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Dozier designed several buildings in Atlanta between 1901 and 1916, including the Episcopal Chapel for the All Saints Episcopal Church and the Southern Ruralist Building.

From Jacksonville's Architectural Heritage, by W. W. Wood

Big Bethel AME Church

Big Bethel AME Church

Big Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church on Auburn Avenue is one of the rehabilitation projects undertaken by J. W. Robinson in the Sweet Auburn historic district.

Courtesy of J. W. Robinson & Associates, Inc.

J. W. Robinson

J. W. Robinson

J. W. Robinson, pictured in June 2006, was an influential Georgia architect. In addition to his firm's work on such public projects as parks, university buildings, and churches in Atlanta, Robinson took an active role in the preservation of historic buildings in the state.

Courtesy of J. W. Robinson & Associates, Inc.

Fire Station # 38

Fire Station # 38

J. W. Robinson received an award from the Atlanta chapter of the American Institute of Architects for his design of Fire Station #38, one of the first projects of J. W. Robinson & Associates, Inc.

Courtesy of J. W. Robinson & Associates, Inc.

C. B. King U.S. Courthouse

C. B. King U.S. Courthouse

The federal courthouse in Albany, named for civil rights attorney C. B. King, was designed by architect J. W. Robinson in 1992 and completed in 2002. It may be the first federal courthouse in the United States to be designed by an African American architect.

Courtesy of Jeffrey L. Robinson

Morton Theatre

Morton Theatre

One of only four Black vaudeville theaters remaining in the country, the historic Morton Theatre in Athens was renovated by Atlanta architect J. W. Robinson and preservation architect Lane Greene.

Martin Luther King Jr. Birthplace

Martin Luther King Jr. Birthplace

The birthplace of Martin Luther King Jr. in Atlanta is one of the many historic properties that J. W. Robinson has worked to restore.

Image from Wally Gobetz

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Thornton House

Thornton House

The Thornton House, designed by J. W. Robinson and built in 1962, is the first Black-designed and -constructed home to be situated in an Atlanta neighborhood long barred to African Americans. Eventually this neighborhood became a mecca for prominent Black professionals and politicians.

Courtesy of J. W. Robinson and Associates, Inc.

Henderson-Orr House

Henderson-Orr House

The Henderson-Orr House (1832), an I-house built by architect Collin Rogers in rural Coweta County, includes the original interior woodwork. The antebellum structure has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Nathan Van Boddie House

Nathan Van Boddie House

The Nathan Van Boddie House (1836), located near LaGrange, represents the mature work of architect Collin Rogers. This Georgian-plan house is dominated by a two-story temple-front Ionic portico with a modillion cornice.

Interior of Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place

Interior of Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place

The Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place (1835-40) in Troup County features finely carved entrance surrounds, which are characteristic of Collin Rogers's later work.

Henderson-Orr House, Side View

Henderson-Orr House, Side View

Collin Rogers built the Henderson-Orr House (1832), an I-house in rural Coweta County, in the Neoclassical style.

Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place

Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place

The Fannin-Truitt-Handley Place (1835-40), a Georgian-plan house, was designed by architect Collin Rogers and is an example of his mature work.

Lowther Hall

Lowther Hall

Lowther Hall, pictured in 1934, was designed by architect Daniel Pratt and built during 1822-23 in Clinton (Jones County).

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Collection

Daniel Pratt

Daniel Pratt

Daniel Pratt lived in Milledgeville from 1821 to 1831, during which time he built several large Neoclassical-style houses.

Courtesy of Alabama Department of Archives and History

Andrew Low House, Savannah

Andrew Low House, Savannah

Architect John Norris began designing the Andrew Low House, on Lafayette Square in Savannah, in 1847. The three-story stucco-over-brick structure was designed in the Italianate style. Juliette Gordon Low married Andrew Low's son, and she went on to found the Girl Scouts of America in this house in 1912.

Savannah Custom House

Savannah Custom House

John Norris's first commission in Savannah was for the Savannah Custom House (1848-52), which he designed in the Greek revival style.

Green-Meldrim House

Green-Meldrim House

The Green-Meldrim House (1853) is one of the earliest Gothic revival houses in Georgia and is distinguished by its cast-iron porch and oriel windows.

John Stoddard’s Upper Range

John Stoddard’s Upper Range

John Stoddard's Upper Range warehouse (1859), built in the Italianate style, was among Norris's final projects in Savannah.

Georgia Health Sciences University

Georgia Health Sciences University

The original building on the campus of Georgia Health Sciences University, completed in Augusta in 1837, was designed by the architect Charles B. Cluskey. The structure, Cluskey's first major building, is an excellent example of the Greek revival style.

Courtesy of Georgia Health Sciences University

Old Governor’s Mansion

Old Governor’s Mansion

A small crowd is gathered outside the Governor's Mansion in Milledgeville around 1880. The open brick fence is noteworthy. The state's governors resided here from 1838 to 1868.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #bal019.

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Old Governor’s Mansion, 1904

Old Governor’s Mansion, 1904

Photograph of the Old Governor's Mansion in Milledgeville, 1904. At this time, the structure served as the home for the president of Georgia Normal and Industrial College (later, Georgia College and State University).

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal169.

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Old Governor’s Mansion, 1941

Old Governor’s Mansion, 1941

Photograph of the Old Governor's Mansion in Milledgeville, circa 1941. Between 1891 and 1987, each president of Georgia College and State University has lived in the house.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal061.

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Old Governor’s Mansion, 1960s

Old Governor’s Mansion, 1960s

Interior view of the Old Governor's Mansion in the early 1960s during restoration, which was completed in 1967. The Greek revival–style structure was designed by Charles Cluskeyand built in the late 1830s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal094.

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Historic St. Simons Island Lighthouse

Historic St. Simons Island Lighthouse

Historic photograph, circa 1914, of the St. Simons Island Lighthouse, which was designed by architect Charles Cluskey. Cluskey was hired to rebuild the lighthouse after it was damaged in the Civil War; he died before the project was completed.

Owens-Thomas House

Owens-Thomas House

The Owens-Thomas House (1819) in Savannah was designed by architect William Jay. The Neoclassical mansion features a Regency-style side porch and a beautiful garden.

Image from JR P

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Archibald Bulloch House, Savannah

Archibald Bulloch House, Savannah

Architect William Jay built this villa on Orleans Square in Savannah in 1819 for Archibald Bulloch. The house was razed in 1916, and the Savannah Municipal Auditorium was constructed on the site. In turn, the Savannah Civic Center was built on the site, replacing the auditorium, in the 1970s.

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society, Foltz Photography Studio (Savannah, Ga.), photographs, 1899-1960, #1360-08-08-01.

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Bank of the United States

Bank of the United States

Engraving of the Bank of the United States (1821), in Savannah. The Greek revival-style building was designed by the architect William Jay and was razed in the 1980s.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey, #HABS GA,26-SAV,38-1.

Wayne-Gordon House

Wayne-Gordon House

The Wayne-Gordon house was designed by the architect William Jay in the Regency style. The Bull Street residence is the birthplace of Juliette Gordon Low and has been home to four generations of the Gordon family.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey Collection, #HABS GA,26-SAV,15-1.

Wayne-Gordon House, Interior

Wayne-Gordon House, Interior

Interior view of the Wayne-Gordon house, the birthplace of Juliette Gordon Low. Designed by architect William Jay, the house is a Regency-style structure, with a stuccoed gray brick facade.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey Collection, #HABS GA,26-SAV,15-6.

Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Building

Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Building

A. Ten Eyck Brown's finest work of the 1930s, and the largest construction project in the city at the lowest ebb of the depression, was the Federal Post Office Annex (1931-33; Alfredo Barili Jr. and W. Humphreys, associate architects), now the Martin Luther King Jr. Federal Building.

Image from Warren LeMay

Fulton County Courthouse

Fulton County Courthouse

The Fulton County courthouse, located in Atlanta, was designed by A. Ten Eyck Brown, with Morgan and Dillon, and built in 1911-14. The courthouse is an example of neoclassical revival/Beaux-Arts classicism architecture.

Photograph by OZinOH

Rhodes Hall

Rhodes Hall

Rhodes Hall in Atlanta (1903) is a late example of picturesque Victorian, with its irregular floor plan and massive exterior features in the Romanesque Revival style, accented with castlelike, crenellated towers and parapets. It is one of the finest examples of W. F. Denny's residential work.

Image from Lars Juhl Jensen

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Telfair Hospital for Females

Telfair Hospital for Females

The Telfair Hospital for Females, in Savannah, was built in 1884 in the Italianate style by the architectural firm of Fay and Eichberg. Funding for the hospital was provided for in Mary Telfair's will, and by 1960, when it merged with Candler General Hospital, the facility had become the longest-operating women's hospital in the country.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey, Photograph by Walter Smalling Jr..

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Powell Building, Milledgeville

Powell Building, Milledgeville

The Powell Building, or Central Building, is part of the Central State Hospital in Milledgeville. Built in 1856, the Greek revival building was designed by Calvin Fay, later of Fay and Eichberg.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

Davis House

Davis House

The Charles A. Davis residence in Greensboro was built in 1874, in the Italianate style, by Calvin Fay and Dewitt Bruyn.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

Brunswick City Hall

Brunswick City Hall

The Brunswick City Hall was built in 1889 in the Romanesque Revival style by architect Alfred S. Eichberg, who had been in a successful practice with Calvin Fay.

Image from Renégat

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Tiedeman House

Tiedeman House

Architect Alfred Eichberg designed a double house for the Tiedeman brothers in Savannah in 1892. The house is a fine example of the Romanesque Revival style, at which Eichberg excelled.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

Eichberg Hall

Eichberg Hall

Eichberg Hall, designed by the firm of Fay and Eichberg and built in 1887 for the Central of Georgia Railway, today houses the architecture program at the Savannah College of Art and Design.

Image from Ebyabe

J. S. Wood House

J. S. Wood House

Alfred Eichberg's historic J. S. Wood House (1891) in Savannah is an example of Georgia's Romanesque Revival period of architecture.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

Schwarz Building

Schwarz Building

This Romanesque Revival building, designed by Alfred S. Eichberg, was constructed in 1890 on Bull Street in Savannah. Formerly known as the Schwarz Building, it has housed a number of different businesses over the years.

Courtesy of Richard D. Funderburke

St. John’s Episcopal Church

St. John’s Episcopal Church

One of the first Gothic revival churches in the state was St. John's Episcopal in Savannah, designed in 1850 by New York architect Calvin Otis and supervised by architect Calvin Fay. St. John's has distinctive pointed arches, buttresses, and great hammerbeam trusses on its interior.

Image from Jud McCranie

Swan House

Swan House

The Edward H. Inman (1925-28) House in Atlanta, also known as Swan House, is one of Philip Trammell Shutze's best-known works with the partnership Hentz, Adler and Shutze. Mrs. Inman chose the swan motif from which the house gets its name.

Rich’s Department Store

Rich’s Department Store

Philip Shutze designed this Rich's Department Store in Atlanta, which was built by the architect firm Hentz, Reid, and Adler in 1924.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

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