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Camp Meeting

Camp Meeting

A hand-colored aquatint by M. Dubourg depicts a Methodist camp meeting held in North America, circa 1819. Camp meetings were a common event during the years of the Second Great Awakening, a series of Protestant revivals held between 1790 and 1830.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Cane Ridge Revival

Cane Ridge Revival

The Cane Ridge Revival, held in Kentucky in 1801, was one of the earliest events in the Restoration Movement, a Protestant movement seeking to unify the church after the pattern described in the New Testament. The revival also represents an early example of a camp meeting, a tradition of outdoor services established in the South during the Second Great Awakening, from 1790 to 1830.

DeKalb County Meeting

DeKalb County Meeting

Participants in a camp meeting, held in DeKalb County around 1900, gather for a photograph inside the tabernacle. The first documented camp meeting in Georgia occurred in 1803 on Shoulderbone Creek in Hancock County.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
dek208-85.

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Salem Camp Ground

Salem Camp Ground

The tabernacle, or arbor, at Salem Camp Ground in Newton County, pictured in 1931, is representative of the architectural form that served as the centerpiece of camp meeting grounds throughout the South. Salem Camp Ground, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1998, continues to hold annual meetings.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
new192-83.

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Resaca Battlefield

Resaca Battlefield

The first major engagement of Union general William T. Sherman's Atlanta campaign occurred in 1864 at Resaca, near Dalton. Through the efforts of the Georgia Civil War Commission, which seeks to preserve sites associated with the war, the state purchased 508 acres of the battlefield in 2000.

Crossroads of Conflict (1994)

Crossroads of Conflict (1994)

The Georgia Civil War Commission, which coordinates the preservation of battle sites in the state, compiled Crossroads of Conflict: A Guide for Touring Civil War Sites in Georgia in 1994. The guidebook is organized by geographical region and offers historical background and directions to sites around the state. A revised edition was published in 2010.

Packard Hall

Packard Hall

The Historically Black College and Universities Initiative, established in 1980 by U.S. president Jimmy Carter, works to provide grants to historically Black campuses to preserve and protect their historic buildings. Packard Hall at Spelman College was identified as endangered in 1988 by the National Park Service.

Courtesy of Spelman College

Gaines Hall

Gaines Hall

Gaines Hall, located on the campus of Morris Brown College in Atlanta, has been renovated as part of the preservation program administered by the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Initiative, which provides grants to historically Black college campuses.

Courtesy of Morris Brown College

Martin Luther King Jr. Birthplace

Martin Luther King Jr. Birthplace

In the Atlanta neighborhood where Martin Luther King Jr. grew up and later preached, the Historic District Development Corporation has been a leader in creating affordable housing and mixed-income development.

Ocmulgee National Historical Park

Ocmulgee National Historical Park

The earthen mounds at the Ocmulgee National Historical Park in Macon are the remains of a native culture that lived at the site between A.D. 800 and 1100, during the Early Mississippian period.

Photograph from National Park Service

Carter Boyhood Home

Carter Boyhood Home

Former U.S. president Jimmy Carter's boyhood home in Plains has been designated a national historic site.

Photograph by OZinOH 

Fort Pulaski National Monument

Fort Pulaski National Monument

The government designated Fort Pulaski a national monument in 1924. Nine years later it became a unit of the National Park Service, which continues to maintain it.

Image from Ron Cogswell

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Fort Frederica National Monument

Fort Frederica National Monument

The British regiment at Frederica disbanded in May 1749. In April 1758, a great fire swept Frederica, reducing much of it to ashes. Today the ruins form the Fort Frederica National Monument.

Sweet Auburn

Sweet Auburn

The Sweet Auburn neighborhood was the heart of the Black residential and business community in the first part of the twentieth century. Pictured in the foreground is an administrative office of the National Park Service, which maintains the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site in the neighborhood.

Grave Markers at Andersonville Cemetery

Grave Markers at Andersonville Cemetery

Andersonville National Historic Site is the only park in the National Park System to serve as a memorial to all American prisoners of war throughout the nation's history. The 495-acre park consists of the historic prison site and the National Cemetery.

Courtesy of UGA Archway Partnership

Lapham-Patterson House

Lapham-Patterson House

The Lapham-Patterson House in Thomasville was built in 1884-85 as a winter home for the Chicago shoe merchant C. W. Lapham. A Victorian-style home with many unusual architectural characteristics, including a double-flue chimney with a walk-through stairway, the house was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1975.

Traveler’s Rest State Historic Site

Traveler’s Rest State Historic Site

Traveler's Rest in Toccoa once stood on Georgia's western frontier; the Cherokee Nation comprised the lands to the west. Built in the early 1800s by a white frontiersman, the inn is notable for its ninety-foot-long porch. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Etowah Mounds

Etowah Mounds

The Etowah Mounds, located near Cartersville, are (left to right) Mound C, Mound B, and Mound A. Mound A, a temple mound, is the tallest structure in the area and affords an impressive view of the Etowah River valley. The top of the mound is about an acre in size.

Courtesy of Adam King

Herndon Home

Herndon Home

The Herndon Home (1910) in Atlanta was the residence of Alonzo Herndon, the founder of Atlanta Life Insurance Company, and his wife Adrienne, who designed the house. The remarkable structure has been a National Historic Landmark since 2000.

Warm Springs Historic District

Warm Springs Historic District

The historic district of Warm Springs and the Little White House, the part-time residence of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, received National Historic Landmark status in 1980.

Martin Luther King Jr. Historic District

Martin Luther King Jr. Historic District

The King historic district includes King's birthplace, church, and grave site. The area was the center of African American life in Atlanta in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Council House, New Echota Historic Site

Council House, New Echota Historic Site

A replica of the Council House at the New Echota Historic Site, designated a National Historic Landmark in 1973.

Image from J. Stephen Conn

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St. Catherines Island

St. Catherines Island

St. Catherines Island, located in Liberty County, is one of the barrier islands lining the coast of Georgia. The privately owned island, a National Historic Landmark, is about ten miles long and approximately one to three miles wide. From the 1590s to the 1680s a Spanish mission, Santa Catalina de Guale, was located on the island (at that time part of the Spanish colony La Florida).

Photograph by Jason D. Williams

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

Atlanta's Fox Theatre has seen more than $20 million in restoration projects since coming under the ownership of the nonprofit organization, Atlanta Landmarks, in 1975. The Fox was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

Hay House

Hay House

The Hay House (1855-59) in Macon is a National Historic Landmark and is open to the public for tours. At the time it was built, the house was among the first in the country to feature hot and cold running water, central heating, an in-house kitchen, a speaker-tube system, and an elaborate ventilation system.

Thomas E. Watson House

Thomas E. Watson House

Georgia politician Thomas E. Watson purchased a home in Thomson in 1881 and lived there until 1904. The home is now a National Historic Landmark and serves as the administrative headquarters for the Watson-Brown Foundation.

Courtesy of Watson-Brown Foundation, Inc.

Fountain Hall

Fountain Hall

Fountain Hall, a National Historic Landmark, is the oldest building on the Morris Brown College campus in Atlanta. Originally built in 1882 as Stone Hall on the Atlanta University campus, the structure was renamed in honor of the Reverend W. A. Fountain Jr., Morris Brown's seventh president.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Buildings Survey, #HABS GA,61-ATLA,10A--12 (CT).

Jekyll Island Club Hotel

Jekyll Island Club Hotel

The original clubhouse for the Jekyll Island Club was completed late in 1887. In 1978 the 240-acre club district was designated a National Historic Landmark, and seven years later work began to restore the clubhouse and annexes into a world-class hotel and resort named the Jekyll Island Club Hotel.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

The Folly

The Folly

The historic home in Columbus known as The Folly dates to the Civil War and is believed to be the only double-octagonal house in the United States. The unique house with Gothic detailing is a National Historic Landmark.

Courtesy of Forrest Shropshire

Taylor-Grady House

Taylor-Grady House

On the west side of Athens, Robert Taylor built a Greek revival-style house with thirteen columns, one for each of the original thirteen colonies. Now known as the Taylor-Grady House, it was the boyhood home of "New South" spokesman Henry W. Grady and is designated a National Historic Landmark.

Photograph from GeorgiaInfo

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