Updated Recently

Sea Island

Sea Island

1 day ago
Alice Walker

Alice Walker

1 week ago
Christian Science

Christian Science

1 week ago

Explore Georgia’s rich music history

From blues and soul to classical and country—our Spotify playlists feature 130+ songs written and performed by Georgians.

Tyler Perry

Tyler Perry

Tyler Perry, a native of New Orleans, Louisiana, is an Atlanta-based filmmaker, playwright, and performer. His Tyler Perry Studios, established in Atlanta in 2008, is the first major film studio in the nation to be owned by an African American.

Photograph from AMFM STUDIOS LLC

Madea Goes to Jail

Madea Goes to Jail

A promotional poster for the film Madea Goes to Jail (2009) features the signature character of Atlanta-based filmmaker and playwright Tyler Perry. The film opened at number one, as did others in the Madea franchise. Madea Goes to Jail was initially produced for the stage in 2005.

Tyler Perry

Tyler Perry

Tyler Perry (center) is pictured in 2009 while filming a scene from the film Why Did I Get Married Too in Atlanta's Inman Park neighborhood. Perry is known for shooting films quickly and inexpensively, in contrast to most Hollywood filmmaking, and for generating exceptionally high returns at the box office.

Andersonville

Andersonville

The television film Andersonville (1996), directed by John Frankenheimer, portrays the experiences of Union soldiers held at Andersonville Prison, the notorious Civil War prison located in Sumter County. The miniseries, starring Carmen Argenziano, Jarrod Emick, Frederic Forrest, and Ted Marcoux, was filmed partially in Coweta County.

The Andersonville Trial

The Andersonville Trial

The Andersonville Trial, a play by Saul Levitt, premiered on Broadway in 1959. In 1970 George C. Scott, a member of the original cast, directed a film adaptation of the play, which focuses on the trial of Henry Wirz, the commander of the Andersonville prison.

Andersonville Prison

Andersonville Prison

A sketch of the Andersonville prison, by John B. Walker (1864). The set of Andersonville, a 1996 television film directed by John Frankenheimer, was modeled on the buildings of the original prison.

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society, Georgia Historical Society Collection of Photographs, 1870-1960, #1361PH-21-13-4296.

View on partner site

Sinfonietta Giocosa

Sinfonietta Giocosa

Dancers in the Atlanta Ballet perform Sinfonietta Giocosa, scored by Czech composer Bohuslav Martinu in 1940 and written by British choreographer Christopher Hampson. Commissioned by the Atlanta Ballet, the work premiered at the Fox Theatre in 2005.

Photograph by Charlie McCullers. Courtesy of Atlanta Ballet

Dorothy Alexander

Dorothy Alexander

In 1929 Dorothy Alexander founded the Dorothy Alexander Dance Art Group, the first regional ballet company in the nation, in Atlanta. Known since 1967 as the Atlanta Ballet, the company is the longest continuously running ballet organization in the United States.

Courtesy of Atlanta Ballet

Peter Pan

Peter Pan

Members of the Atlanta Ballet perform Peter Pan in Atlanta. The ballet was choreographed by John McFall, who became the company's artistic director in 1994, and was performed in London, England, during the 1999 Royal Festival Hall's Christmas season.

Photograph by Kim Kenney. Courtesy of Atlanta Ballet

Centre for Dance Education

Centre for Dance Education

The Atlanta Ballet's Centre for Dance Education opened in 1996 and provides dance instruction to approximately 1,700 students each year. Course offerings include ballet, flamenco, and tap dancing.

Courtesy of Atlanta Ballet, Photograph by Kim Kenney.

Kenny Leon

Kenny Leon

Kenny Leon, the artistic director of the Alliance Theatre from 1990 until 2001, performs the role of Ebenezer Scrooge in the company's 2002 production of A Christmas Carol.

Photograph by Eric Richardson

Alliance Children’s Theatre

Alliance Children’s Theatre

The Snoogle-Fleejer, played by Bart Hansard, befriends Jeremy, played by Zachary Solomon, in the Alliance Children's Theatre's production of The Little Baby Snoogle-Fleejer in 2005. The play is based on a children's book written by Jimmy Carter and his daughter, Amy.

Photograph by Christopher Oquendo

Rashad and Young

Rashad and Young

Actors Phylicia Rashad and Mark Young portray the characters Angel and Guy in the Alliance Theatre's 1995 production of Blues for an Alabama Sky, written by Georgia playwright Pearl Cleage.

Photograph by Jennifer Lester

Cotton Patch Gospel

Cotton Patch Gospel

In 2004 Smyth and Helwys Publishing in Macon produced a four-volume set of Clarence Jordan's "Cotton Patch" translations of New Testament books. Through his translations of the Greek text, Jordan attempted to write a more accessible version of the scriptures.

Cotton Patch Gospel

Cotton Patch Gospel

Cotton Patch Gospel, based on Clarence Jordan's "Cotton Patch" translations of the New Testament, was adapted as a musical in 1982 by Tom Keys, an actor from Atlanta. This videotaped performance of the play was released in 1989 by Alpha-Omega Productions.

Margaret Edson

Margaret Edson

Margaret Edson, a kindergarten teacher in Atlanta, began writing her Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Wit, in 1991. The play focuses on Vivian Bearing, a literature professor who is struggling with cancer.

Photograph by Dave Smiley

Margaret Edson

Margaret Edson

Margaret Edson holds her prize certificate at the 1999 Pulitzer Prize luncheon ceremony at Columbia University in New York City.

Courtesy of Columbia University

Sarah Bernhardt

Sarah Bernhardt

The French actress Sarah Bernhardt poses in costume for her role in the play Camille, by Alexandre Dumas (fils), in 1880. Bernhardt performed the play twice in Atlanta, once in 1881 and again in 1906.

Courtesy of Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas at Austin

Morton Theatre

Morton Theatre

The historic Morton Theatre was built by Monroe B. "Pink" Morton in 1910 at "Hot Corner" (Hull and Washington streets) in Athens as a cultural center for the Black community. It was the first vaudeville theater in the country to be built, owned, and operated by an African American.

Photograph by Melinda Smith Mullikin, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Morton Theatre

Morton Theatre

As a primary venue of entertainment for the African American community in Athens, the Morton Theatre hosted some of the most prominent vaudeville, blues, and jazz performers during the first half of the nineteenth century

Morton Theatre

Morton Theatre

One of only four Black vaudeville theaters remaining in the country, the historic Morton Theatre in Athens was renovated by Atlanta architect J. W. Robinson and preservation architect Lane Greene.

Lulu Hurst’s Chair Act

Lulu Hurst’s Chair Act

This illustration of Lulu Hurst's chair act appeared in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper on July 26, 1884. Word of her demonstrations quickly spread beyond Georgia, as Hurst toured much of the country with her parents from 1884-85.

Lulu Hurst’s Cane Act

Lulu Hurst’s Cane Act

The young Lulu Hurst made holding onto a cane nearly impossible for grown men in one of her most famous demonstrations.

Lulu Hurst Atkinson and Family

Lulu Hurst Atkinson and Family

Lulu Hurst Atkinson (seated front left) poses for a family portrait with her mother, Sarah Evelyn Wood Hurst; her father, William E. Hurst (seated rear); and her husband, Paul Atkinson.

From History of the Jane Peek Family

Alan Ball

Alan Ball

Alan Ball at work on the set of the HBO series Six Feet Under, for which he wrote, produced, and directed. The series received the Peabody Award in 2002. Ball also wrote the Oscar-winning screenplay for the 1999 film American Beauty.

Photograph from Corbis

Pearl Cleage

Pearl Cleage

An award-winning writer, Pearl Cleage is known for exploring difficult or controversial subjects in her fiction and nonfiction works, including Deals with the Devil and Other Reasons to Riot (1993) and What Looks Like Crazy on an Ordinary Day (1997).

I Wish I Had a Red Dress

I Wish I Had a Red Dress

In her novel I Wish I Had a Red Dress (2001), Pearl Cleage addresses the challenges modern-day Black women face.

Pearl Cleage: New South

The writer Pearl Cleage describes how she's a "product of the New South."

Video by Darby Carl Sanders, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Pearl Cleage: Activist Artist

The writer Pearl Cleage explains the idea of making "revolution irresistible."

Video by Darby Carl Sanders, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Pearl Cleage: The Urgency of Art

The writer Pearl Cleage explains why she feels the need to "write fast": artists who can envision a better world have a responsibility to convey their ideas for change.

Video by Darby Carl Sanders, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Pearl Cleage: Discomfort with Art

The writer Pearl Cleage believes that we must not be afraid to let art make us uncomfortable sometimes, particularly when the artist is different from ourselves.

Video by Darby Carl Sanders, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Pearl Cleage: Multiculturalism

The writer Pearl Cleage says that multiculturalism in the arts ultimately highlights our similarities, not our differences.

Video by Darby Carl Sanders, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Pearl Cleage: Insecurity

The writer Pearl Cleage believes that a little bit of insecurity is valuable for an artist.

Video by Darby Carl Sanders, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Pearl Cleage: Flyin’ West

The writer Pearl Cleage discusses one of the ideas behind her play (1992): that women have the right to protect themselves.

Video by Darby Carl Sanders, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Fox Theatre Auditorium

Fox Theatre Auditorium

The Fox Theatre auditorium with curtain and proscenium.

Courtesy of Fox Theatre. Photograph by Michael Portman

Fox Theatre Marquee

Fox Theatre Marquee

The Fox Theatre marquee at night. The Fox has dominated the performing arts scene in Atlanta.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

Exterior photograph of the Fox Theatre, showing the different parts of the theater building.

Courtesy of Fox Theatre. Photograph by Michael Portman

Organ, Fox Theatre

Organ, Fox Theatre

The Fox Theatre's Moller Deluxe forty-two-rank pipe organ console is known as "Mighty Mo." The Moller has many sound effects, including songbirds and sirens.

Photograph by Michael Portman. Courtesy of Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre Ushers

Fox Theatre Ushers

Fox Theatre ushers, circa 1930s.

Photograph by Edgar Orr. Copyright Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

Crowds line up along two blocks for the grand opening of the Fox Theatre in Atlanta on December 25, 1929. The structure, designed by the architecture firm of Marye, Alger, and Vinour, was originally intended to serve as the city's Yaarab Temple but was redesigned as a theater before its completion.

Photograph by Edgar Orr. Copyright Fox Theatre

Save the Fox Campaign

Save the Fox Campaign

A "Save the Fox" poster from 1976 advertises "An Evening at the Fox" fund-raising event held by Delta Zeta sorority. During the 1970s, the theater was threatened with demolition, but efforts by Atlanta historic preservation groups prevented its destruction.

Courtesy of Fox Theatre. Copyright Delta Zeta Sorority

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

Atlanta's Fox Theatre has seen more than $20 million in restoration projects since coming under the ownership of the nonprofit organization, Atlanta Landmarks, in 1975. The Fox was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1976.

Fox Theatre

Fox Theatre

This photograph shows some of the elaborate details of the Fox Theatre's right organ chamber and proscenium.

Egyptian Ballroom, Fox Theatre

Egyptian Ballroom, Fox Theatre

The Egyptian Ballroom stage of the Fox Theatre.

Frank Manley

Frank Manley

Poet, dramatist, and novelist Frank Manley received two Georgia Author of the Year awards (one for fiction and one for short stories/anthologies), a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and first prize at the 1985 Humana Festival of New American Plays.

Courtesy of Emory University

Swamp Gravy

Swamp Gravy

Since its opening in 1992, the play's impact has been felt around the nation as cast members share their art-based community revitalization experiences in other towns and states.

Courtesy of Swamp Gravy

Swamp Gravy

Swamp Gravy

Swamp Gravy, Georgia's official state folklife play, is performed annually from July to October in Colquitt and is based on stories from the lives of Miller County residents.

Swamp Gravy

Swamp Gravy

From the beginning, one of the play's goals was to bridge the racial divide in predominantly white Miller County, and the cast has always had been integrated.

Heaven Bound

Heaven Bound

Performed in pantomime, the play Heaven Bound depicts the conflict between the pilgrims and Satan, who is the main character. Churchgoers make up the cast, which includes thirty-four players and ten pilgrims.

Courtesy of Gregory Coleman

Heaven Bound

Heaven Bound

Heaven Bound pioneered Black theater in the South at a time when Blacks were shut out of mainstream traditional theater. The Black and white people who packed Big Bethel's sanctuary to see the drama seated themselves in an integrated fashion, though racial segregation was still the law.

Courtesy of Gregory Coleman

Heaven Bound

Heaven Bound

The New York Times has called Heaven Bound "one of Atlanta's most enduring traditions." By the turn of the century the play had become one of the longest continuously running theater productions in the nation.

Courtesy of Gregory Coleman