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John D. Gray

John D. Gray

John D. Gray was the first major railroad contractor in the South and served as president of the Monroe Railroad in Georgia. During the Civil War he manufactured weaponry for the Confederacy.

Courtesy of Nancy Eubanks

Train Passengers

Train Passengers

Passengers pose for a photograph, circa 1901, at Gallemore, a community in Twiggs County located between Macon and Danville. Railroad construction played a key role in the settlement patterns of Twiggs County in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bib050.

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Central of Georgia Railway Overpass

Central of Georgia Railway Overpass

The Central of Georgia Railway overpass in Savannah crosses the Savannah-Ogeechee Canal, shown around 1888. The bridge still exists in Savannah today.

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society, Georgia Historical Society Collection of Photographs, 1870-1960, #1361PH-28-11-5395.

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Norfolk Southern Engine

Norfolk Southern Engine

A Norfolk Southern engine is pictured in 2007. Norfolk Southern and CSX are the only major railroad lines still operating in Georgia.

Photograph from Wikimedia

Colquitt Depot

Colquitt Depot

A Central of Georgia Railway train stops at the depot in Colquitt, the seat of Miller County, around 1890. The only incorporated town in the county, Colquitt was named in honor of preacher and politician Walter Terry Colquitt.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
mil001.

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Allatoona Pass

Allatoona Pass

Gaining control of the railroads leading into and out of Atlanta was key to Union victory during the Civil War. On June 3, 1864, Union general William T. Sherman overcame the Confederates at Allatoona Pass. The Allatoona train depot appears in the center of this 1864 photograph, taken by George N. Barnard.

Courtesy of U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

Tifton, Thomasville, and Gulf Railroad

Tifton, Thomasville, and Gulf Railroad

Bystanders greet the arrival of the first train on the Tifton, Thomasville, and Gulf Railroad in Thomasville, on July 20, 1900.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
tho186a.

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East and West Railroad Construction

East and West Railroad Construction

The East and West Railroad, built between Cartersville and Cedartown around 1900, is one of several railroads that came to Polk County in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
plk073-84.

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Southern Railroad

Southern Railroad

A portion of the Southern Railroad known as the North Broad Curve, photographed in 1908, winds through Stephens County near Toccoa. Economic growth in Toccoa, which was dubbed the "Furniture, Thread, and Steel City," was spurred by its close proximity to the railroad running between Atlanta and Charlotte, North Carolina.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
stp044.

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Bremen Depot

Bremen Depot

The depot at Bremen in Haralson County, pictured circa 1925, was built for the Southern Railway. Norfolk Southern, which bought Southern, still uses the lines for its freight trains.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
hrl019.

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Atlanta Terminal Station

Atlanta Terminal Station

The Atlanta terminal station. Railroads expanded in Atlanta during the 1840s, making the city a commerce and transportation hub.

Courtesy of Boston Public Library, Tichnor Brothers Postcard Collection.

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Crescent Route, Amtrak

Crescent Route, Amtrak

Amtrak's Crescent train is shown pulling into the Brookwood Station in Atlanta in 2000. The Crescent route runs from New York City to New Orleans, Louisiana. Passenger service is available in Georgia through two Amtrak routes.

Photograph by Loco Steve 

Summerville Depot

Summerville Depot

The Chattanooga, Rome, and Columbus Railroad reached Chattooga County in 1889, with lines to Summerville, Lyerly, and Trion. The original depot was built the same year. In 1901 the CR&C merged with the Central of Georgia. The depot, pictured in 2004, was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992.

Photograph by Shelia J. Cothran, City of Summerville

Waycross Depot

Waycross Depot

Local leaders named the city of Waycross after the many roads crossing here in 1874. The area was once known as Old Nine, or Number Nine, after the railroad station number.

Photograph by J. Stephen Conn 

Sparks Depot

Sparks Depot

Five men and a dog, pictured circa 1907, stand on the platform of the train depot in Sparks, an incorporated city in Cook County. The town was established as a train stop at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
cok004.

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Blue Ridge Scenic Railway

Blue Ridge Scenic Railway

The Blue Ridge Scenic Railway transports tourists on excursion trips between Blue Ridge, the seat of Fannin County, and McCaysville. The train operates each year from April through December.

Image from Thomas Hawk

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Seaboard Air Line Railway

Seaboard Air Line Railway

A Seaboard Air Line Railway train pulls into the depot at Claxton, circa 1915. Claxton, the seat of Evans County, was founded when the first railroad came through the area in the 1890s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
eva010.

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Logging Railroad

Logging Railroad

Railroads, which reached the rim of the Okefenokee Swamp by 1861, brought with them sawmills and turpentine stills, store-bought goods, circuses, and new people.

Courtesy of C. T. Trowell

Winterville Depot

Winterville Depot

The Winterville railroad depot, built in Clarke County in the late nineteenth century, was first known as "Six-mile Station" to indicate its distance from Athens. Later known as Winter's Station, the depot today houses Winterville's visitors center.

Richland Depot

Richland Depot

A rail line was first constructed in Stewart County in 1885, and the town of Richland grew up around the depot. Rails once connecting Americus to Montgomery, Alabama, and Columbus to Tallahassee, Florida, cross at Richland.

Courtesy of Matthew M. Moye

Winder Depot

Winder Depot

The old train depot in Winder currently houses the city's chamber of commerce. The arrival in 1883 of the railroad spurred economic growth in Winder, which was renamed in appreciation of John H. Winder, the general manager of Seaboard Air Line Railway.

Image from Chris Pruitt

Blackshear Depot

Blackshear Depot

The Blackshear railroad depot in Pierce County, added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2000, houses the chamber of commerce as well as the county's Heritage Museum and genealogical library. The depot was built in 1902.

Courtesy of John Walker Guss and Pierce County Historical and Genealogical Society, Inc.

Canton Depot

Canton Depot

Passengers await a train at the U&N Depot in Canton around 1910. The arrival of the first railroad in 1879 brought tourists to the town, located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, during the summer months.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
crk026.

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Macon Depot

Macon Depot

In 1992 Congress passed a transportation bill that provided enhancement funding for historic and natural resources associated with transportation routes and facilities, such as Macon's railroad depot.

Wrightsville Depot

Wrightsville Depot

The Wrightsville railroad depot, located in the seat of Johnson County, was built in 1900 by the Wrightsville and Tennille Railroad. Pictured circa 1915, the depot was restored duringthe 1990s and today houses the Wrightsville–Johnson County Chamber of Commerce and the Johnson County Development Authority.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
jhn110.

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Forest Park Depot

Forest Park Depot

This depot at Forest Park, shown circa 1900, was one of the stops along the railroad to Jonesboro, in Clayton County.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #clt056-84.

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Warner Robins Depot

Warner Robins Depot

The Warner Robins railroad depot was created during World War II and became a critical site for the war effort. The town of Warner Robins grew up around the depot.

Image from Jud McCranie, Wikimedia Commons

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Millen Depot

Millen Depot

The train depot in Millen, in Jenkins County, was destroyed by Union forces during the Civil War and later rebuilt. Today the depot houses the "Olde Freight Depot Museum."

Courtesy of Theron Cates, Millen

Riverdale Depot

Riverdale Depot

The Riverdale depot of the Southern Express Company railroad system was dismantled in 1939. Pictured, left to right: Henry McElroy; A. O. Bowles, railway agent and station master; and M. Vassa McConnell, postmaster. Leon Hancock on roof.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # clt027-84.

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Glennville Depot

Glennville Depot

A Register and Glennville train, pictured in 1906, stops at the depot in Glennville, today the largest city in Tattnall County. The R&G Railroad was renamed the East Georgia Railway in 1914.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
tat017.

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Juliette Depot

Juliette Depot

The railroad depot in Juliette, in Monroe County, is pictured circa 1900.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
mnr183.

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Atlantic Coast Line Depot

Atlantic Coast Line Depot

People gather outside the Atlantic Coast Line Depot in Cairo, the seat of Grady County, circa 1916. With the arrival of the railroads in the county, area residents were able to market their agricultural products, including timber.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
gra040.

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F-22 Raptor

F-22 Raptor

The F-22 fighter jet flew for the first time on September 7, 1997, from Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta. At the beginning of this test flight, which lasted more than an hour, the aircraft reached an altitude of 15,000 feet in less than three minutes.

Lockheed Martin

Lockheed Martin

The Lockheed Martin plant in Marietta employs nearly 8,000 workers on two major projects, the C-130J cargo plane and the F-22 fighter plane.

C-130 Hercules

C-130 Hercules

Compared with earlier models of C-130 Hercules cargo planes, Lockheed Martin's C-130J has a higher cruising altitude and can reach 28,000 feet in fourteen minutes.

Photograph by Wikimedia

C-141 Starlifter

C-141 Starlifter

In the mid-1960s the Lockheed C-141 Starlifter became the first all-jet cargo plane to deploy in the U.S. Air Force. It quickly became the air force's airlift mainstay. Its wide body can accommodate a variety of missions, including personnel and equipment transport, disaster relief, and cargo supplies. 

Photograph by Wikimedia

C5-Galaxy

C5-Galaxy

One of the biggest aircraft ever made, Lockheed's C-5 Galaxy first flew in 1968. The plane has a wingspan of nearly 223 feet, is 247 feet long and 65 feet high, and can carry 135 tons of cargo. 

Photograph from the U.S. Air Force

Maule M-4-180V

Maule M-4-180V

The Maule M-4-180V, an updated model of Maule Air's M-4 design, was released in 2005. Maule Air, based in Moultrie, is an aircraft manufacturer owned by the family of B. D. Maule, who founded the company in 1941.

Courtesy of Maule Air

Maule Taildragger

Maule Taildragger

The Maule taildragger model M-7-420AC lands on water. Maule Air, based in Moultrie, manufactures twenty models of STOL (Short Takeoff Or Landing) airplanes that can be used in a variety of terrains.

Courtesy of Maule Air

B. D. Maule

B. D. Maule

B. D. Maule, an aircraft designer, founded the B. D. Maule Company in Michigan in 1941. The company, known today as Maule Air, Incorporated, moved to Moultrie in 1968 and continues to produce a line of single-engine airplanes based on Maule's design of the "M-4," which he completed in 1956.

Courtesy of Maule Air

Maule Air

Maule Air

The Maule Air factory was built at Spence Air Base in Moultrie by B. D. and June Maule in 1968. In addition to the factory buildings, the family constructed a lodge home and a lake on the grounds.

Courtesy of Maule Air

Gulfstream IV-SP

Gulfstream IV-SP

The Gulfstream IV-SP, pictured here, is part of the Gulfstream fleet of aircraft produced by the Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, based in Savannah.

Courtesy of Gulfstream Aersopace Corporation

Leroy Grumman and Pilots

Leroy Grumman and Pilots

Leroy Grumman (left) congratulates pilots Fred Rowley (center) and Carl Alber after their successful initial flight of the new Gulfstream I model in 1958. The aircraft, which seated twelve, could reach a maximum speed of 350 miles per hour.

Courtesy of Northrop Grumman History Center

Gulfstream I

Gulfstream I

On August 14, 1958, the business aircraft Gulfstream I took its maiden flight. The plane represented a shift away from a sole focus on military aircraft for the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Company, which later became Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, based in Savannah.

Courtesy of Northrop Grumman HIstory Center

Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

The service center of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation was built in 2006 as part of an expansion of the company's Savannah headquarters. In 2012 Gulfstream employed more than 11,500 people at eleven major locations, including two in Georgia, at Savannah and Brunswick.

Courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

G550

G550

The G550 is Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation's most advanced passenger jet, boasting a range of 6,750 nautical miles at .885 Mach.

Courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

G650

G650

The G650 is the largest, most technologically advanced aircraft in the Gulfstream fleet. The plane is capable of traveling 7,000 nautical miles at 0.85 Mach or 5,000 nautical miles at 0.925 Mach.

Image from Charly W. Karl

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Gulfstream Factory

Gulfstream Factory

The production facilities for Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation have been located in Savannah since 1967. In 2006 the company expanded the Savannah plant to include a new service center, fuel farm, paint hangar, and sales and design center.

Gulfstream Production

Gulfstream Production

Workers assemble a plane at the Savannah headquarters of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation. Between 1958 and 2012, the company produced more than 2,000 aircraft, including its signature Gulfstream fleet.

Courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

Gulfstream I

Gulfstream I

Gulfstream I, the first aircraft of the Gulfstream fleet, was designed in 1957 by the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Company and took its maiden flight in 1958. Today the fleet is produced by the Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, based in Savannah.

Courtesy of Northrop Grumman History Center

Gulfstream I

Gulfstream I

The Gulfstream I, designed in 1957 by the Grumman Aircraft Manufacturing Company, was the first aircraft of its kind designed specifically for business travel. The aircraft seated twelve and boasted a maximum speed of 350 miles per hour at 25,000 feet.

Courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

Bryan T. Moss

Bryan T. Moss

Having served as vice chairman of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation since 1995, Bryan T. Moss was appointed president in 2003 and served until his retirement in 2008. A graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology, Moss had previously worked for the Lockheed-Georgia Company.

Courtesy of Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation

Leroy Grumman

Leroy Grumman

Leroy Grumman and his business partner, Leon Swirbul, founded the Grumman Aircraft Engineering Company (later Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation) on Long Island, New York, in 1930. The company introduced the Gulfstream fleet of aircraft in 1958 and in 1967 moved its headquarters to Savannah.

Courtesy of Northrop Grumman History Center

Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway

Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway

A man-made channel known as the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway allows watercraft to navigate the marshes separating Georgia's barrier islands from the mainland.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Intracoastal Waterway Marina

Intracoastal Waterway Marina

Boats are docked at an intracoastal marina, which offers protection from the open sea. The Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway is regularly dredged to keep it navigable, resulting in significant change to the Georgia shoreline.

Lindbergh Parade

Lindbergh Parade

Charles Lindbergh parades through downtown Atlanta where crowds line the street on October 11, 1927. He is on his way to Grant Field at Georgia Tech, where he will deliver a message on the commercial potential of aviation to a crowd of 20,000 people.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Spirit of St. Louis

Spirit of St. Louis

Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis lands on the grass runway at Candler Field on October 11, 1927. The day was cloudy and rainy but that did not deter thousands from meeting Lindbergh at the field. The Spirit of St. Louis is now on display at the National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, D.C.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Charles Lindbergh

Charles Lindbergh

The groundbreaking aviator Charles Lindbergh stands beside an airplane on Sapelo Island. The photograph was probably taken around 1929, when Lindbergh paid a short visit to the island.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #sap058.

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Charles Lindbergh Departs

Charles Lindbergh Departs

In this aerial photograph Charles Lindbergh prepares to take off from Candler Field on October 12, 1927, in the Spirit of St. Louis. He is bound for Spartanburg, South Carolina, the next stop on his triumphal tour.

Lindbergh Stamp

Lindbergh Stamp

The 1927 Lindbergh U.S. Air Mail stamp commemorates Charles Lindbergh's record-breaking transatlantic flight in the Spirit of St. Louis, a specially constructed Ryan monoplane.

Souther Field Historical Marker

Souther Field Historical Marker

This marker commemorating Charles Lindbergh's solo flight was placed on the grounds of present-day Souther Field Airport in 1985, although the actual location of Lindbergh's flight is the ground beneath what is now the South Georgia Technical College campus.

Photograph by Jamil S. Zainaldin

Lindbergh Day Arrival

Lindbergh Day Arrival

Governor Lamartine Hardman (right) greeting aviator Charles Lindbergh (left) upon his arrival at Candler Field during his nationwide tour in 1927.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Inman Orphanage

Inman Orphanage

The Inman family donated a portion of their wealth to many charitable causes in Atlanta, including several colleges, the Confederate Soldiers' Home, Grady Memorial Hospital, and this orphanage.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Inman Family

Inman Family

Four generations of the Inman family begin with (right to left) Shadrach W. Inman, Samuel M. Inman, Henry Arthur Inman, and Arthur Crew Inman. Shadrach arrived in Atlanta from east Tennessee in 1865 to join his brothers William H. and Walker P. Inman. The Inman family soon became among the most wealthy and prominent in the city.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Samuel Inman

Samuel Inman

Samuel Inman, the oldest son of Shadrach W. Inman, opened a dry goods store in Augusta before becoming, along with his brother Hugh and friend Joel Hurt, an investor in railroads, streetcars, and banks in Atlanta during the 1890s.

Courtesy of Atlanta History Center.

Entomopter Artificial Insect

Entomopter Artificial Insect

The Entomopter may one day fly in the thin atmosphere of Mars, collecting data that rovers and other spacecraft are unable to find.

Raines with Eleanor Roosevelt

Raines with Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt inspects the British Air Transport Auxiliary pilots in England, October 26, 1942. Hazel Raines, second from the left, flew as a ferry pilot for the ATA during World War II.

Courtesy Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame

Raines in Uniform

Raines in Uniform

One of only twenty-five women chosen to wear the Air Transport Auxiliary uniform, Hazel Raines logged more flight hours than other pilot in the ATA.

Courtesy Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame

Hazel Raines

Hazel Raines

Hazel Raines was the first woman in Georgia to earn a pilot's license. She flew as a ferry pilot in World War II for the British, and in 1943 joined the Women Airforce Service Pilots (known as WASPs) in Texas.

Raines Earns Certificate

Raines Earns Certificate

After the WASPs were deactivated in 1944, Hazel Raines (back row, fourth from right) became an instructor with the Brazilian Air Ministry. On August 4, 1945, she received a certificate from the J. P. Riddle Company Instructors' School in Miami, Florida, where she completed a course on the teaching of technical subjects in Portuguese.

Courtesy Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame

Savannah Port

Savannah Port

One of the busiest ports on the East Coast of the United States, Savannah handles approximately 80 percent of the shipborne cargo entering Georgia.

Photograph by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 

Port of Brunswick

Port of Brunswick

The Port of Brunswick comprises three deepwater terminals. The port's reputation for productivity and efficiency is heightened by its position as one of the fastest growing auto and heavy machinery ports in North America.

Photograph by Jaxfl

Boeing 727

Boeing 727

The Boeing 727 "Whisper Jet" became a workhorse in the passenger industry after it entered service for Eastern in 1964. Its nickname came from its three quiet engines, which offered high-powered performance. It held 138 seats and cruised at 605 miles per hour.

Reprinted by permission of Boeing Company

Eastern Air Lines

Eastern Air Lines

Passengers boarding an Eastern airplane onto the tarmac at Atlanta Municipal Airport in the 1950s, with Miss Atlanta attending.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Carolyn Lee Wills Collection of Eastern Airlines' Southern Region Public Relations Office records, Southern Labor Archives.

Eastern Air Transport

Eastern Air Transport

A 1949 advertisement for Eastern Air Transport promotes service from New York City to Florida.

Courtesy of Duke University, Ad*Access Collection.

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Douglas DC-3

Douglas DC-3

The Douglas DC-3 revolutionized air passenger transportation. Introduced in 1936, it carried up to twenty-eight passengers at a cruising speed of 170 miles per hour. It was the main passenger transport in the United States until it was replaced after World War II by the DC-4, DC-6, and DC-7. 

Photograph by Wikimedia

Lockheed Super Constellation

Lockheed Super Constellation

The tritailed four-engine Constellation, originally developed by Lockheed for use by the armed services, was first adapted for passenger service by Eastern in 1947. The 1950s "Super Constellation" was an upgrade. The "Connie" held seventy-two seats in its pressurized cabin and cruised at 327 miles per hour.

Reprinted by permission of Lockheed Company

Douglas DC-7

Douglas DC-7

The Douglas DC-7 represented the most important development in airline technology since the DC-3, a pre-World War II plane. With its pressurized cabin, the DC-7 offered a high standard of comfort to air travel and was widely adopted among the major airline carriers for long-haul traffic. It held sixty-nine seats and cruised at 360 miles per hour. 

Photograph by Wikimedia

Lockheed L-1011 TriStar

Lockheed L-1011 TriStar

The Lockheed L-1011 TriStar began flying for Eastern Air Lines in 1972. The TriStar was a wide-body, three-engine jet with intercontinental range. It held 250 seats and cruised at 552 miles per hour.

Photograph from Wikimedia

Boeing 757

Boeing 757

The two-engine Boeing 757 entered service in the early 1980s, replacing the aging 727. 

Photograph by Wikimedia

Curtiss Condor

Curtiss Condor

The Curtiss Condor was a two-engine biplane that inaugurated Eastern's passenger service. Eastern operated the plane from 1930 to 1934.

Convair 440

Convair 440

The Convair 440 was a post-World War II innovation for short-haul traffic. For its time the 440 was economical, comfortable, and fast. It was also well suited to Eastern's connecting routes among intermediate-sized cities. It held forty-four seats and cruised at 284 miles per hour. 

Photograph by Wikimedia

Lockheed Electra

Lockheed Electra

In 1959 Eastern began flying the Lockheed Electra, a four-engine turboprop, carrying sixty-six seats and cruising at 370 miles per hour.

Reprinted by permission of Lockheed Company

Douglas DC-8

Douglas DC-8

The Douglas DC-8 (together with the Boeing 707) inaugurated the jet age in the airline industry. Eastern placed its first orders for the new plane in 1960. The jet replaced the DC-7 and remained in service for years, benefiting from equipment upgrades and a "stretched" fuselage to accommodate more passengers. It held 119 seats and cruised at 590 miles per hour.

Photograph by Wikimedia

Boeing 720

Boeing 720

The Boeing 720 offered Eastern a long-haul jet liner, entering service in 1961. The Boeing 720, a shortened version of the 707, held 140 seats and cruised at 600 miles per hour.

Reprinted by permission of Boeing Company

The Spirit of Delta

The Spirit of Delta

A two-engine, wide-body jet with transcontinental range, the Boeing 767 entered service with Delta in 1982. This model was the first to fly for Delta.

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

Delta Tail-art

Delta Tail-art

Two Delta jets parked at Hartsfield International Airport in 1997 display an old tail-art design in the foreground and a new design in the background.

Huff Daland Biplane

Huff Daland Biplane

A Huff Daland biplane dusts insecticide in Madison Parish, Louisiana. In the mid-1920s C. E. Woolman worked for the Huff Daland Company, a crop-dusting operation based in Monroe, Louisiana. In 1928 Woolman purchased the company, which became Delta Air Lines.

Courtesy of USDA Tallulah Experiment Station

C. E. Woolman

C. E. Woolman

C. E. Woolman's name is synonymous with Delta Air Lines. He raised the capital for the purchase of the company in 1928 (named Delta Air Transport, Inc. in 1929) and stepped down as chief executive officer in 1965.

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

Delta Flight Attendant

Delta Flight Attendant

In 1940 Delta Air Lines added flight attendants to the crew of some of its passenger planes. This photo was taken in 1943 at the cabin door of a Douglas DC-3.

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

Douglas DC-7

Douglas DC-7

The Douglas DC-7 brought yet another development in passenger flight. With a pressurized cabin that allowed it to fly "above the weather," the sixty-nine-seat DC-7 cruised at 360 miles per hour. The cabin and services offered an air of affluence, which Delta dubbed its "Royal Service."

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

Delta Advertisement

Delta Advertisement

An ad for Delta Air Service promotes the airline's service between Dallas, Texas, and Birmingham, Alabama. Founded in Louisiana in 1928, Delta moved its headquarters to Atlanta in 1941.

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

Douglas DC-8

Douglas DC-8

The DC-8 inaugurated Delta's transition to jet service in 1959. Cruising at 590 miles per hour with 119 seats, the DC-8 was an important step in Delta's rise as a nationally competitive airline. The DC-8 pictured is at a passenger boarding "jetway" at Hartsfield International Airport.

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

Lockheed L-1011 TriStar

Lockheed L-1011 TriStar

The Lockheed L-1011 TriStar wide-body airliner entered service in 1973. In 1977 it inaugurated the company's Atlanta-London route. The TriStar held 241 seats and cruised at 552 mph.

Photograph from Wikimedia

Delta Gate

Delta Gate

Delta employees board passengers at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

Delta Air Lines

Delta Air Lines

Cargo is loaded onto a Delta wide-body airliner.

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

Douglas DC-3

Douglas DC-3

The Douglas DC-3 was the most important development in passenger air service before World War II. Widely adopted by the airline industry, the DC-3 introduced new standards of reliability, speed, efficiency, and comfort for passengers. The DC-3 carried up to twenty-eight passengers at a cruising speed of 180 miles per hour.

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

Douglas DC-4

Douglas DC-4

The Douglas DC-4 was a post-World War II development that replaced the DC-3. With four engines, the DC-4 cruised at 215 miles per hour and held forty-four seats. 

Photograph by Wikimedia

Douglas DC-9

Douglas DC-9

The Douglas DC-9 was ideally suited to Delta's short-haul route system. With sixty-five seats and a cruising speed of 560 miles per hour, the DC-9 entered service in 1967. It stayed in service for the next two decades.

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

Boeing 777

Boeing 777

The Boeing 777 is the newest Boeing-developed passenger plane and the most recent addition to Delta's fleet. Its two-isle cabin is smaller than that of the 747, but larger than all other twin- or tri-jet passenger aircraft.

Reprinted by permission of Delta Air Lines

P-40N

P-40N

The P-40 was the major fighter for the Army Air Corps at the beginning of World War II. The P-40N, the fastest of the series, was the final production version. The aircraft on display was obtained by the Museum of Aviation in 1994 with help from the 653rd Combat Logistics Support Squadron and the Air Force Reserve.

Courtesy of the Museum of Aviation

Museum of Aviation

Museum of Aviation

The Museum of Aviation covers fifty-one acres and includes open-air displays and hangars. The museum is located on the grounds of Robins Air Force Base in Warner Robins, ten miles south of Macon.

Courtesy of Museum of Aviation

Eagle Building Rotunda

Eagle Building Rotunda

A TG-4A Glider (right) and a T-6G North American Texan (left) hover over an F-15 Eagle Fighter Jet in the Eagle Building rotunda of the Museum of Aviation.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

America’s Black Eagles Exhibit

America’s Black Eagles Exhibit

A group of children listen to a lecture about the contribution of Black Americans to the World War II effort at the "America's Black Eagles: The Tuskegee Pioneers . . . and Beyond" Exhibit at the Museum of Aviation.

Courtesy of the Museum of Aviation

Flight Suit Exhibition

Flight Suit Exhibition

A group of children learn about the suits pilots wear at the Museum of Aviation's Flight Suit Exhibition.

Courtesy of the Museum of Aviation

General Robert Scott

General Robert Scott

The story of General Robert Scott (right), a famed member of the American Volunteer Group, or the "Flying Tigers," is part of an exhibition on World War II at the Museum of Aviation in Warner Robins. Scott was involved extensively in the museum's development and served as a museum docent from the mid-1980s until his death in 2006.

Courtesy of the Museum of Aviation

Convair F-102 “Delta Dagger”

Convair F-102 “Delta Dagger”

The Convair F-102 "Delta Dagger" was the U.S. Air Force's first delta-winged jet and supersonic all-weather interceptor. The experimental version of the aircraft flew in 1953, and it went into service with the air force's Air Defense Command in 1956. The Delta Dagger's maximum speed was 810 miles per hour.

Image from Alan Wilson

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McDonnell F-101 “Voodoo”

McDonnell F-101 “Voodoo”

The McDonnell F-101 "Voodoo" made its initial flight in 1954. The U.S. Air Force developed several versions of the Voodoo: a single seat, low-altitude fighter-bomber; a single-seat reconnaissance version; and a two-seat fighter-interceptor version that served in the Air Defense Command. The maximum speed of the Voodoo was 1,095 miles per hour.

Image from Robert Karma

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Boeing B-29 “Superfortress”

Boeing B-29 “Superfortress”

The Boeing B-29 "Superfortress," first test flown in 1943, was the most advanced heavy bomber of World War II. Its powerful engines and pressurized cabin allowed the B-29 to fly higher, faster, and with a larger bomb-carrying capacity than any other airplane in its day. It served primarily in the Pacific theater of World War II and later in the Korean War.

Image from Alan Wilson

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Douglas C-124 “Globemaster II”

Douglas C-124 “Globemaster II”

The Douglas C-124 "Globemaster II" first flew in 1949. Deliveries to the U.S. Air Force began the following year. A four-engine troop and cargo carrier, the Globemaster's clamshell nose accommodated tanks, jeeps, and other vehicles.

Image from Eric Friedebach

Lockheed AC-130 “Spectre”

Lockheed AC-130 “Spectre”

The Lockheed AC-130 "Spectre" is an attack gunship version of the C-130 cargo and troop carrier. The Spectre has side-firing guns and advanced avionics that allow it to loiter over targets in any weather and time of day. 

Image from Gary Todd

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Color photograph of Eugene Bullard Statue at Robins Air Force Base

Eugene Bullard Statue

On October 9, 2019, a statue honoring Eugene Bullard—the world's first Black fighter pilot—was unveiled at the Museum of Aviation, on the grounds of Robins Air Force Base. 

Photograph by Captain Edner J. Julian, U.S. Army National Guard

State Route 86

State Route 86

The Georgia Department of Transportation maintains the state's network of highways with proceeds from the state's motor fuel tax and other state and federal funds.

Photograph by Ken Lund 

Georgia Department of Transportation

Georgia Department of Transportation

Georgia Department of Transportation workers pave a road. The GDOT is responsible for planning, constructing, and maintaining Georgia's network of highways and bridges, among other transportation outlets.

Star-DOT

Star-DOT

Star-DOT provides statewide coverage of traffic conditions. The Star-DOT line, staffed by NaviGAtor operators and part-time staff, receives more than 950 calls per day from drivers who use the free service.

Courtesy of GDOT Transportation Management Center

Six Interstate Highways

Six Interstate Highways

Six interstate highways (I-20, I-75, I-85, I-285, I-575, and I-675) help metropolitan Atlanta residents get where they need to go.

Photography by Wikimedia

NaviGAtor Transportation System

NaviGAtor Transportation System

Message signs on urban highways perform average speed and distance calculations and operate from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. The signs are part of the GDOT's NaviGAtor system.

Courtesy of GDOT Transportation Management Center

Incident Response Unit

Incident Response Unit

Incident response units (also known as HERO units) are specially trained personnel who can deal quickly with accidents and disabled vehicles.

Photograph by Kevin Trotman

DeKalb Peachtree Airport

DeKalb Peachtree Airport

DeKalb Peachtree Airport occupies the original site of Naval Air Station Atlanta, which operated from 1942 to 1959. This aerial view was taken shortly after control was returned from the navy to the county.

Courtesy of Paul Stephen Hudson

Transportation Management Center

Transportation Management Center

The Transportation Management Center is located in the Wayne Shackelford building, which serves as headquarters of NaviGAtor. The TMC is located five miles from downtown Atlanta, adjacent to the Georgia Emergency Management Agency and the state patrol.

Courtesy of GDOT Transportation Management Center

Augusta Canal

Augusta Canal

Preservationists in Georgia are working to conserve both the Savannah-Ogeechee Canal and the Augusta Canal. The Augusta Canal was named a National Heritage Area in 1996.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Chattahoochee River

Chattahoochee River

Barges, flatboats, and steamboats carried goods and passengers along the Chattahoochee River during the nineteenth century. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, however, the river is valued more as a source of drinking water and recreation than as a transportation artery.

Diversion Dam, Augusta

Diversion Dam, Augusta

A vintage photo of the headgate diversion dam, a part of the Savannah, Ogeechee, Altamaha Canal in Augusta.

Courtesy of Augusta Canal National Heritage Area

Thomas Butler King

Thomas Butler King

Thomas Butler King is remembered primarily as a planter/politician from coastal Georgia who labored to improve the nation's nascent transportation and communication networks.

Courtesy of Georgia Historical Society, Foltz Photography Studio (Savannah, Ga.), photographs, 1899-1960, #1360-25-11-10.

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Savannah-Ogeechee Canal

Savannah-Ogeechee Canal

Completed in 1829, the Savannah-Ogeechee Canal facilitated the growth of Savannah's economy. This photograph captures the canal between 1888 and 1889, after it had been supplanted by railroads as the primary shipping method within the state.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Historic American Engineering Record, #HAER GA,26-SAV,18-.

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Augusta Canal

Augusta Canal

This vintage postcard, dating from around 1875, depicts the headgate and dam of the Augusta Canal, which was constructed in 1845.

Courtesy of Augusta Canal National Heritage Area

Confederate Powder Works

Confederate Powder Works

The Augusta Canal, designed to generate waterpower for manufacturing as Georgia entrepreneurs attempted to diversify the state's economy, was the last canal built in Georgia and by far the most successful. Construction on the canal started in 1844, and the canal became operational in 1846.

Courtesy of Explore Georgia, Photograph by Ralph Daniel.

Spaghetti Junction in Atlanta

Spaghetti Junction in Atlanta

Spaghetti Junction is the name given to the intersection of Interstates 85 and 285, along with lesser roads, in Atlanta. The Interstate Highway System was developed under U.S. president Dwight D. Eisenhower in the late 1950s. Lucius D. Clay, a Marietta native, was the principal architect of the system, designing its route of more than 46,000 miles.

Photograph by U.S. Geological Survey

Spaghetti Junction in Atlanta

Spaghetti Junction in Atlanta

The Tom Moreland Interchange, commonly called Spaghetti Junction.

Image from Elaine Chambers, Wikimedia Commons

The Downtown Connector

The Downtown Connector

The downtown connector is formed by a merger of I-85 and I-75 that runs through mid- and downtown Atlanta.

Photograph by Matt Lemmon

Cotton Bales

Cotton Bales

An unidentified woman, pictured circa 1920, stands with some cotton bales in a Central of Georgia railroad yard.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
geo148-92.

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Central of Georgia Railway

Central of Georgia Railway

A former Central of Georgia Railway locomotive sits parked at the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Image from Allen Forrest

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Central Rail Road and Banking Company of Georgia

Central Rail Road and Banking Company of Georgia

Originally known as the Central Railroad and Canal Company of Georgia, it was reorganized as the Central Rail Road and Banking Company in 1835. At that time the Central was perhaps the longest railroad under one management in the world.

Norristown Depot

Norristown Depot

A crowd gathers to meet the train at the Central of Georgia Railway depot in Norristown, in Emanuel County. The arrival of railroads in the county during the 1870s spurred the growth of the local lumber industry.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #emn004.

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Central of Georgia Railway

Central of Georgia Railway

A Central of Georgia Railway train is pictured near Augusta in 1967. At that time the Central had been a subsidiary of the Southern Railway for four years.

Courtesy of George Lane

Decatur MARTA Station

Decatur MARTA Station

The architecture firm Stevens and Wilkinson designed award-winning libraries and rapid transit stations; of the latter the MARTA station on Church Street in Decatur (1979) is their best.

Photograph by Melinda G. Smith, New Georgia Encyclopedia

MARTA

MARTA

Passengers exit and board a Bankhead Train at the 5 Points MARTA Station in Atlanta, 1993. The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, known as MARTA, provides bus and rapid rail service to the most urbanized portions of the Atlanta metropolitan area.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive.

MARTA Tunnel, 1979

MARTA Tunnel, 1979

Atlanta legislators and MARTA officials are shown touring the cavernous tunnel that would carry MARTA's north line when it opened in September 1981. The tunnel runs 1.9 miles under Broad, Peachtree, and West Peachtree streets.

Georgia State University MARTA Station, 1978

Georgia State University MARTA Station, 1978

Workers construct MARTA's Georgia State University rapid rail transit station at the Atlanta police station (left) on the edge of downtown Atlanta.

Lenox MARTA Station

Lenox MARTA Station

As of 2002, the MARTA station adjacent to Lenox Square Mall in northeast Atlanta's Buckhead neighborhood was one of thirty-eight existing stations.