Pat Conroy

1945-2016

Augusta Jane Evans

Wilson1835-1909

Mac Hyman

1923-1963

Ha Jin

b. 1956

Terry Kay

1938-2020

Frances Mayes

b. ca. 1940

John Stone

1936-2008

Don West

1906-1992

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Explore Georgia’s rich music history

From blues and soul to classical and country—our Spotify playlists feature 130+ songs written and performed by Georgians.

Black and white photo of Shay Youngblood at typewriter

Shay Youngblood

Shay Younblood is pictured at a Yaddo artist residency in Saratoga Springs, New York. A graduate of Clark College (later Clark Atlanta University), Youngblood has received numerous honors, including a Pushcart Prize, a Lorraine Hansberry Playwriting Award, and several NAACP Theater Awards.

Courtesy of Shay Youngblood, Photograph by Carol Bullard.

Color portrait of Shay Youngblood

Shay Youngblood

Shay Youngblood, from Columbus, writes novels, plays, and shorts stories that center on the lives of Black women. Her plays have been staged in theaters across the country, including numerous productions in Atlanta.

Courtesy of Shay Youngblood, Photograph by Miriam Phields.

Color photo of the playwright Lauren Gunderson

Lauren Gunderson

Lauren Gunderson, from Decatur, is one of the most produced playwrights in the United States. Atlanta's Essential Theatre produced her first play when she was still in high school.

Black and white photograph of the poet Anya Silver

Anya Silver

Anya Krugovoy Silver, a poet and longtime professor at Mercer University, was the author of four collections of poetry. She was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 2018.

Photograph from Mercer University

Color image of the book jacket for Anya Silver's poetry collection, I Watched You Disappear

I Watched You Disappear

Silver's second book, I Watched You Disappear (2014), won the Georgia Author of the Year award for poetry.

Michael Bishop

Michael Bishop

Michael Bishop was named to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame in 2018. 

The Secret Ascension

The Secret Ascension

The Secret Ascension: Philip K. Dick is Dead, Alas (1987) imagines a parallel universe in which President Richard Nixon, serving his fourth term, has turned the country into a totalitarian police state.

Ancient of Days

Ancient of Days

Like many of Bishop's works, the 1985 novel Ancient of Days is set in Georgia. 

Frank Yerby

Frank Yerby

Augusta native Frank Yerby came to be known as "king of the costume novel" for his successful works of historical fiction. 

Courtesy of Digital Library of Georgia, Georgia Historic Newspapers.

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Sue Monk Kidd

Sue Monk Kidd

Sue Monk Kidd is the author of multiple novels, including The Secret Life of Bees and The Invention of Wings.

William Grimes

William Grimes

This portrait was published with the Life of William Grimes, the Runaway Slave. The book, the first slave narrative printed in the U.S., was first published in New York City in 1825.

Photograph from Dwight C. Kilbourne, The Bench and Bar of Litchfield County, Connecticut, 1709-1909: Biographical Sketches of Members, History and Catalogue of the Litchfield Law School Historical Notes

Savannah Rice Plantations, 1825

Savannah Rice Plantations, 1825

This map of Savannah River-area rice plantations was created in 1825, the same year William Grimes first published his narrative in New York City. Grimes served six enslavers in Savannah between 1811 and 1815 before escaping to freedom in New England.

Chatham County Map Portfolio, compiled by workers of the Writers program of the Works Projects Administration in the State of Georgia. Sponsored by the Georgia Society of the Colonial Dames of America.

Casa Genotta

Casa Genotta

Carlotta O'Neill, the wife of playwright Eugene O'Neill, stands outside Casa Genotta, their home on Sea Island. The O'Neills built the house in 1932 and lived there until 1936.

Courtesy of National Park Service

Carlotta and Eugene O’Neill

Carlotta and Eugene O’Neill

Eugene O'Neill, a prominent playwright, and his wife, Carlotta, are pictured in a portrait by Carl Van Vechten in September 1933. In 1932 the O'Neills built a new home, Casa Genotta, on Sea Island and lived there until 1936. O'Neill wrote several plays during their residence, including his only comedy, Ah Wilderness!, and the first draft of A Touch of the Poet.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Photograph by Carl Van Vechten.

General William T. Sherman

General William T. Sherman

In this photograph, taken by George N. Barnard, Union general William T. Sherman sits astride his horse at Federal Fort No. 7 in Atlanta. Sherman's Atlanta campaign, which lasted through the spring and summer of 1864, resulted in the fall of the city on September 2.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Photograph by George N. Barnard, #LC-DIG-cwpb-03628.

Turnwold Plantation

Turnwold Plantation

Five enslaved people are pictured at Turnwold Plantation, the Eatonton estate of Joseph Addison Turner. Writer Joel Chandler Harris, who lived at Turnwold during the Civil War, drew upon his experiences there to write his Uncle Remus tales, as well as his autobiographical novel On the Plantation.

Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell's epic Civil War love story, Gone With the Wind, was published in June 1936. Mitchell was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for the novel in May 1937.

A Distant Flame

A Distant Flame

Philip Lee Williams, a native of Madison, won the 2004 Michael Shaara Prize for Civil War Fiction for his novel A Distant Flame (2004). The novel chronicles the experiences of protagonist Charlie Merrill before, during, and after the Atlanta campaign of 1864.

Southern Poetry Review

Southern Poetry Review

Southern Poetry Review, one of the oldest literary journals in the Southeast, was founded in Florida in 1958 and has been based at Armstrong State University in Savannah since 2002. Pictured is the cover of the journal's fall 2006 issue, featuring a photograph by Dave Beckerman entitled The Secret Garden.

Macaria Title Page

Macaria Title Page

Title page of the original edition of Macaria; or, Altars of Sacrifice, a novel by Columbus native Augusta Jane Evans. Published in 1864, during the Civil War, the novel was sympathetic to the Confederate cause and redefined the roles available to Southern women during the war.

From Documenting the American South, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries

Augusta Jane Evans (Wilson)

Augusta Jane Evans (Wilson)

Augusta Jane Evans (Wilson) wrote nine novels that were among the most popular fiction in nineteenth-century America. Her most successful novel, St. Elmo (1866), sold a million copies within four months of its appearance and remained in print well into the twentieth century.

Courtesy of State Archives of Alabama

Macaria

Macaria

Augusta Jane Evans, a native of Columbus, published Macaria; or, Altars of Sacrifice, in 1864, during the Civil War. In 1992 historian Drew Gilpin Faust edited a new edition of the text, restoring passages that had been dropped from reissues of the narrative.

Joel Chandler Harris

Joel Chandler Harris

Journalist and folklorist Joel Chandler Harris is best known for his collection of Uncle Remus tales. His fictionalized memoir, On the Plantation (1892), details life during the Civil War on the Turnwold Plantation in Eatonton, where Harris lived and worked as a typesetter for Joseph Addison Turner's Confederate newspaper The Countryman.

Turnwold Plantation

Turnwold Plantation

Turnwold Plantation in Eatonton was the home of Joseph Addison Turner, who published a Confederate newspaper called The Countryman during the Civil War. It is also the setting of On the Plantation, a fictionalized account by Joel Chandler Harris of his experiences as a young typesetter at Turnwold.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
put168.

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Julian Harris

Julian Harris

Julian Harris, editor and co-owner, with his wife, Julia, of the Columbus Enquirer-Sun, reads mail at his desk in the late 1920s. Harris, the son of Georgia folklorist Joel Chandler Harris, and his wife jointly won a Pulitzer Prize in 1926 for their reporting in the Enquirer-Sun on state officials with ties to the Ku Klux Klan.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ful0939-85.

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Native Guard

Native Guard

Natasha Trethewey, a graduate of the University of Georgia and professor at Emory University, won the Pulitzer Prize in poetry for her third collection of poems, Native Guard (2006).

Elbow Room

Elbow Room

In 1978 Savannah-born writer James Alan McPherson became the first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize in fiction. He was awarded the prize for Elbow Room, a collection of short stories published in 1977 by Little, Brown.

Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell's epic Civil War love story, Gone With the Wind, was published in June 1936. Mitchell was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for the novel in May 1937.

Margaret Edson

Margaret Edson

Margaret Edson holds her prize certificate at the 1999 Pulitzer Prize luncheon ceremony at Columbia University in New York City.

Courtesy of Columbia University

The Americans

The Americans

The Americans, a trilogy written by Atlanta-born historian Daniel Boorstin, explores the development of the American character. The third volume, The Democratic Experience (1973), won the Pulitzer Prize in History in 1974.

Pulitzer Prize

Pulitzer Prize

In 1926 journalists Julian and Julia Harris, husband and wife, won a Pulitzer Prize for public service in honor of their editorials against the activities of the Ku Klux Klan and against legislation prohibiting the teaching of evolution in public schools. The editorials were published in the Columbus Enquirer-Ledger, which the couple co-owned during the 1920s.

Ralph McGill

Ralph McGill

Journalist Ralph McGill won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing in 1959. As editor and publisher of the Atlanta Constitution, McGill broke the code of silence on the subject of segregation.

Mike Luckovich

Mike Luckovich

Mike Luckovich, a native of Seattle, Washington, became the editorial cartoonist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution in 1989. Luckovich has twice won the Pulitzer Prize, in 1995 and 2006, for his nationally syndicated work.

University of Georgia Library

University of Georgia Library

The main library at the University of Georgia is located on the historic north campus. UGA's library system contains more than 3.9 million volumes, making it the largest academic library in Georgia. The library is also home to the University of Georgia Press.

Photograph from Zlatko Unger

University of Georgia Press

University of Georgia Press

The University of Georgia Press, pictured in 2007 at its location in east Athens, was established in 1938. One of the largest university presses in the Southeast, UGA Press seeks to publish works that preserve and advance the intellectual, cultural, and environmental heritage of Georgia, the South, and the nation.

Photograph by Sarah E. McKee, New Georgia Encyclopedia

UGA Press Catalog, 1940

UGA Press Catalog, 1940

The University of Georgia Press, founded in 1938, produced its first catalog of books in 1940. At that time the press had published eight books, including its first title, Segments of Southern Thought, by Edd Winfield Parks, and its first volume of poetry, Marguerite, the Sister and Wife of Kings, by Rae S. Neely.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Press

Decatur Book Festival

Decatur Book Festival

Shoppers browse books at the Leed's Books display at the Decatur Book Festival in 2011.

Image from TimothyJ

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Under the Red Flag

Under the Red Flag

Ha Jin's collection of short stories Under the Red Flag won the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction and was published by the University of Georgia Press in 1997.

The Sweet Everlasting

The Sweet Everlasting

The Sweet Everlasting, the debut novel of Georgia native Judson Mitcham, was published by the University of Georgia Press in 1996. The book won the Townsend Prize for Fiction that year.

Governor’s Award in the Humanities

Governor’s Award in the Humanities

On May 8, 2008, the University of Georgia Press received the Governor's Award in the Humanities during a ceremony in Atlanta. Pictured, from left, are press director Nicole Mitchell, Speaker Pro Tempore Mark Burkhalter, press editor-in-chief Nancy Grayson, and Georgia Humanities Council chair Tim Hynes.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Press

UGA Press Advisory Council

UGA Press Advisory Council

Members of the University of Georgia Press advisory council and their spouses pose in May 2008 at Flinchum's Phoenix, a facility owned by the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, in Athens. The council was formed by press director Nicole Mitchell in 2004.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Press

Marian McCamy Sims

Marian McCamy Sims

Marian McCamy Sims, a fiction writer, was a native of Dalton and an alumnae of Agnes Scott College in Decatur. Her novels and short stories, written in North Carolina during the 1930s and 1940s, focus primarily on the lives of white, middle-class southerners.

Reprinted by permission of University of North Carolina at Charlotte Library, Marian McCamy Sims Papers.

McCamy Home

McCamy Home

The family home of writer Marian McCamy Sims, pictured circa 1921, was built in Dalton around 1918. Originally located on South Thornton Avenue, the house was later moved to another site.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
wtf096.

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Natasha Trethewey

Natasha Trethewey

Natasha Trethewey was named poet laureate of the United States in 2012. A native of Mississippi, Trethewey graduated from the University of Georgia in 1989. Her third volume of poetry, Native Guard, won the Pulitzer Prize in 2007.

Courtesy of Emory University

Natasha Trethewey

Natasha Trethewey

Poet Natasha Trethewey signs books following a reading at the University of Georgia on January 16, 2008. Trethewey read selections from Native Guard, which won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 2007.

Photograph by Sarah E. McKee, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Domestic Work

Domestic Work

Domestic Work (2000), by Natasha Trethewey, was selected by former U.S. poet laureate Rita Dove to be the first winner of the Cave Canem Prize, awarded each year to the best first collection of poems by an African American poet.

Eliza Frances Andrews

Eliza Frances Andrews

Eliza Frances Andrews (pictured ca. 1879) was a writer of journals, novels, newspaper reports, botany articles and textbooks, and editorials. Her published diary, War-Time Journal of a Georgia Girl, 1864-1865, is one of the most compelling first-person accounts of the Civil War home front.

Courtesy of University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Lupton Library Special Collections

Eliza Frances Andrews

Eliza Frances Andrews

Image of Eliza Frances Andrews in the War-Time Journal of a Georgia Girl, 1864-1865, one of the most compelling first-person accounts of the Civil War (1861-65) home front, published in 1908. Eliza Frances Andrews was a writer, newspaper reporter, editor, columnist, social critic, scientist, and educator. By the time of her death in 1931 in Rome, Georgia, Andrews had written three novels, more than a dozen scientific articles on botany, two internationally recognized botany textbooks, and dozens of articles, commentaries, and reports on topics ranging from politics to environmental issues.

Image from The War Time Journal of a Georgia Girl (1908)

Georgia Writers Association

Georgia Writers Association

The Georgia Writers Association, founded by volunteers in 1994, supports and encourages literary efforts in the state by educating writers about the publishing industry, promoting the works of writers to the public, and sponsoring events. The organization also publishes a bimonthly journal, Georgia Writers News/Mag.

Courtesy of Georgia Writers Association

Anthony Grooms

Anthony Grooms

Anthony Grooms is the author of a collection of poetry, Ice Poems (1988), a collection of stories, Trouble No More (1995), and two novels, Bombingham (2001) and The Vain Conversation (2018).

Photograph by J. D. Scott

Five Points

Five Points

Five Points, a journal published by the creative writing program at Georgia State University, was founded in 1996 by Georgia writers David Bottoms and Pam Durban. The journal publishes a variety of genres, including poems, essays, short stories, and photographs. The cover of the winter 2001 issue is pictured.

Contradictions

Contradictions

Poet Alfred Corn's collection Contradictions was published in 2002 by Copper Canyon Press. Corn, born in Bainbridge, has published several collections of poetry as well as essays, translations, and other writings.

All Roads at Once

All Roads at Once

All Roads at Once, the first book of poems by Georgia native Alfred Corn, was published in 1976 by Viking Press. The collection was highly praised by literary critics.

Alfred Corn

Alfred Corn

A native of south Georgia, Alfred Corn is considered to be one of the most original poets writing in the United States.

Courtesy of Poetry Foundation

No Second Eden

No Second Eden

Turner Cassity's No Second Eden, published in 2002 by Swallow Press, offers verse exploring a wide range of subjects and includes several of the Atlanta-based writer's most personal poems.

Turner Cassity

Turner Cassity

Poet Turner Cassity, a Mississippi native, worked for nearly thirty years as a librarian at Emory University's Robert W. Woodruff Library. Cassity's verse tends toward the New Formalist school and offers a broad interpretation of modern "southernness."

Tayari Jones

Tayari Jones

Tayari Jones, an Atlanta native, writes short stories, articles, and novels, many of which focus on African American life in her hometown after the civil rights movement. A graduate of Spelman College, Jones has received fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference and the Corporation of Yaddo, among others.

Photograph by Richard Powers

Leaving Atlanta

Leaving Atlanta

Leaving Atlanta, the debut novel of Atlanta native Tayari Jones, chronicles the child murders of 1979-81 in Atlanta's Black community. Told from the perspective of three elementary school children, the novel received several awards and honors, including the Lillian Smith Book Award in 2005.

The Untelling

The Untelling

The Untelling, published in 2005, is the second novel by Atlanta native Tayari Jones. Through a narrative focusing on a young African American woman's work among the poor in Atlanta, Jones explores the changing dynamics of race, class, and gender in the urban South.

Coleman Barks

Coleman Barks

Coleman Barks, professor emeritus of literature at the University of Georgia, is renowned both for his translations of the thirteenth-century poet Rumi and for his own verse.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Photographic Services

Gourd Seed

Gourd Seed

Coleman Barks's second major collection of poetry, Gourd Seed, was published in 1993. Many of the poems in the collection are narrative in style and address a wide range of topics, from family to war.

The Essential Rumi

The Essential Rumi

Georgia poet Coleman Barks's The Essential Rumi, a translation of work by Islamic poet Jalal al-Din Rumi, was first published in 1995. Barks began translating the thirteenth-century poetry in 1976 with the encouragement of poet Robert Bly.

Coleman Barks reads “Some Orange Juice”

Coleman Barks reads his poem "Some Orange Juice" from the book (1993).

Video by Darby Carl Sanders, New Georgia Encyclopedia

Coleman Barks: Rumi 1

Coleman Barks discusses the sophisticated way he attempts to “get out of theway” of himself when translating Rumi’s poetry.

Video by Darby Carl Sanders and Joshua Borger, the New Georgia Encyclopedia.

Coleman Barks: Rumi 2

Coleman Barks describes Rumi’s sense of what falling in love means.

Video by Darby Carl Sanders and Joshua Borger, the New Georgia Encyclopedia.

Lillian Smith

Lillian Smith

The author Lillian Smith, a longtime resident of Clayton, is best known for her novel Strange Fruit, published in 1944, and her nonfiction treatise Killers of the Dream, first published in 1949 and reissued in 1961. Both works are strong denunciations of racism and segregation in the South.

Killers of the Dream

Killers of the Dream

Lillian Smith's Killers of the Dream, first published in 1949, offers a harsh indictment of southern racism. Initially the work was not well received, but its reissue in 1961 during the civil rights movement established the book as a classic of twentieth-century southern letters. Book jacket from the 1949 edition published by W. W. Norton.

Walter Griffin

Walter Griffin

Walter Griffin, pictured in 2005, founded the Atlanta Poets Workshop in 1972 and conducted meetings until 1998. Griffin had more than 400 publications to his credit and was named the master poet-in-residence by the Georgia Council for the Arts and Humanities in 1978.

Courtesy of Walter Griffin

Port Authority: Selected Poems, 1965-1976

Port Authority: Selected Poems, 1965-1976

In 1976 Walter Griffin, an Atlanta poet, published Port Authority: Selected Poems, 1965-1976. Another of his published collections, Night Music (1974), won the International Small Press Book Award and the Georgia Poet of the Year Award.

Zona Rosa

Zona Rosa

Georgia poet Rosemary Daniell leads a Zona Rosa workshop at her home in Savannah. Daniell founded this creative-writing forum for women in 1981 and christened it Zona Rosa, which is Spanish for "pink zone," in 1983. Similar workshops also operate in Atlanta, Daniell's hometown, and in Charleston, South Carolina.

Courtesy of Southern Living

Rosemary Daniell

Rosemary Daniell

Rosemary Daniell, an Atlanta native, began writing poetry in continuing education classes at Emory University during the late 1950s and early 1960s. Since that time she has published books in several genres, including poetry, fiction, and memoir.

Courtesy of Rosemary Daniell

The Woman Who Spilled Words All Over Herself

The Woman Who Spilled Words All Over Herself

The Woman Who Spilled Words All Over Herself (1997) is a writing guidebook for women by Rosemary Daniell. Daniell, the founder of the Zona Rosa workshops in Savannah, Atlanta, and Charleston, South Carolina, presents the writing process as an opportunity for women's healing and empowerment.

John Donald Wade

John Donald Wade

John Donald Wade posed for this portrait by Kate F. Edwards in the early 1910s. Wade, a great-great-grandson of John Adam Treutlen, the state's first governor, was an important participant in the Vanderbilt Agrarian movement of the 1930s. Also a noted biographer, Wade published works on the lives of Augustus Baldwin Longstreet and John Wesley.

John Donald Wade

John Donald Wade

Native Georgian John Donald Wade contributed to I'll Take My Stand (1930), the manifesto of the Agrarian literary movement, while teaching at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. In 1934 Wade returned to the University of Georgia, where his academic career began, and twelve years later founded the Georgia Review, a renowned literary journal.

From Selected Essays and Other Writings, edited by D. Davidson

Alfred Uhry

Alfred Uhry

Alfred Uhry, a native of Atlanta, is the author of several successful plays, including Driving Miss Daisy (1987), The Last Night of Ballyhoo (1997), and Parade (1998). Uhry has received a Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award, and several Tony Awards over the course of his career.

Photograph by Carol Rosseg

Driving Miss Daisy

Driving Miss Daisy

The 1989 film Driving Miss Daisy was originally written as a play by Alfred Uhry. Set in Atlanta before, during, and after the civil rights movement, the work explores the relationship between Miss Daisy, a southern Jewish woman, and her African American driver, Hoke. Morgan Freeman played Hoke in both the Atlanta premiere of the play and the film. Jessica Tandy portrayed Miss Daisy in the film version.

The Georgia Review

The Georgia Review

The spring 2005 issue of the Georgia Review features the work of Savannah artist Nancy Terry Hooten. A photograph of her beaded figure, The One Who Came Before (1998), appears on the cover. A literary journal founded in 1947 at the University of Georgia, the Georgia Review features fiction, poetry, book reviews, and full-color visual art.

Stanley Lindberg

Stanley Lindberg

Stanley Lindberg served as editor of the Georgia Review from 1977 until his death in 2000. He is credited with transforming this regional literary magazine into an award-winning journal that regularly publishes the work of some of the nation's most renowned writers.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Photographic Services

Cold Sassy Tree

Cold Sassy Tree

After a career in journalism, Olive Ann Burns was inspired to write her first novel, Cold Sassy Tree, after being diagnosed with cancer in 1975. The book was published in 1984 by Ticknor and Fields; the cover of the 1986 paperback reprint by Dell is pictured.

Olive Ann Burns

Olive Ann Burns

Olive Ann Burns, a native of Banks County, began her writing career as a journalist for the Atlanta Journal and Constitution Magazine in 1946. She is best known for her novel Cold Sassy Tree (1984), which is set in the fictional town of Cold Sassy, Georgia, and draws upon Burns's family history.

Lightered: New and Selected Poems

Lightered: New and Selected Poems

Poet Van K. Brock's most recent collection of poetry, Lightered: New and Selected Poems, was published in 2005 by Anhinga Press. Anhinga, founded by Brock in 1972, publishes poetry chapbooks and holds a national poetry competition each year.

Courtesy of Anhinga Press

Van K. Brock

Van K. Brock

Van K. Brock, a Thomas County native, began writing poetry during the 1950s while studying and working at Emory University in Atlanta. In addition to publishing several books of poetry, Brock served as poetry editor for the journal National Forum and as editor for International Quarterly.

Courtesy of Anhinga Press

Calder Willingham

Calder Willingham

Georgia native Calder Willingham, shown circa 1970, wrote novels, plays, and screenplays. His screenplay for The Graduate (1967), cowritten with Buck Henry, was nominated for an Academy Award. Willingham also wrote many other scripts, including The Strange One (1957), which was an adapation of his first novel, End as a Man (1947).

Photograph from Corbis

Janisse Ray

Janisse Ray

Janisse Ray, a native of Baxley, is an environmental activist and award-winning author.

Photograph by Nancy Marshall

Ecology of a Cracker Childhood

Ecology of a Cracker Childhood

Originally published in 1999 by Milkweed Editions, Ecology of a Cracker Childhood is Janisse Ray's memoir of growing up in Appling County, as well as a plea for the protection of the region's longleaf pine ecosystem. The book garnered several awards, including the Southern Book Critics Circle Award and the American Book Award.

Margaret Edson

Margaret Edson

Margaret Edson, a kindergarten teacher in Atlanta, began writing her Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Wit, in 1991. The play focuses on Vivian Bearing, a literature professor who is struggling with cancer.

Photograph by Dave Smiley

Ha Jin

Ha Jin

Ha Jin, a native of China's Liaoning Province, traveled to the United States in 1985 to pursue a doctorate in English. His first collection of poetry in English appeared in 1990, and since that time he has published additional collections of poems and short stories, as well as several novels. In 1993 Jin joined the creative writing faculty at Emory University, where he taught for ten years.

Photograph by Michael Romanos

Ha Jin

Ha Jin

After teaching creative writing at Emory University in Atlanta for ten years, Ha Jin became a full professor in the creative writing program at Boston University in 2003. Jin has garnered numerous awards for his writing, including the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction in 1997 and the National Book Award in 1999.

Courtesy of Powells.com

Waiting

Waiting

Waiting, written by former Emory professor Ha Jin and published by Random House, won the National Book Award for Fiction and the PEN/Faulkner Award in 1999. The novel chronicles nearly two decades in the life of a Chinese doctor torn between his wife, whom he is unable to divorce under Chinese law, and his girlfriend.

Lewis Grizzard

Lewis Grizzard

The country-boy perspective of Georgia-born humorist and best-selling author Lewis Grizzard shaped his reaction to all of his personal experiences even as he became a national and international celebrity. Grizzard published twenty-five books on a variety of subjects, from women and religion to golf and UGA football.

Lewis Grizzard

Lewis Grizzard

Grizzard got his start as sports editor of the Athens Daily News and the Atlanta Journal. In 1977 he began to write a regional color column for the that was eventually syndicated in about 450 newspapers.

Melissa Fay Greene

Melissa Fay Greene

Melissa Fay Greene, a native of Macon, has written two award-winning books chronicling dramatic episodes in the civil rights movement in Georgia: Praying for Sheetrock (1991) and The Temple Bombing (1996).

Photograph from UGA Today

Praying for Sheetrock

Praying for Sheetrock

Praying for Sheetrock (1991), the first book by Macon native Melissa Fay Greene, covers the belated advent of the civil rights movement in McIntosh County during the 1970s. The book won several awards, including the Lillian Smith Book Award, and was later adapted into a play.

Frances Mayes

Frances Mayes

Mayes has achieved wide recognition for two best-selling books about her life and her second home in Italy: Under the Tuscan Sun: At Home in Italy and Bella Tuscany: The Sweet Life in Italy.

Under the Tuscan Sun

Under the Tuscan Sun

Frances Mayes's Under the Tuscan Sun was published by Chronicle Books in 1996. The book opens with the purchase of an Italian villa outside the town of Cortona, Italy, and details the villa's renovation and Mayes's discovery of a vibrant new culture. This cover comes from the 1997 paperback reprint by Broadway.

Will and Elizabeth Harben

Will and Elizabeth Harben

The novelist Will Harben poses with Elizabeth, one of his three children, in 1915.

Courtesy of James Murphy

Will Harben

Will Harben

Will Harben, a Dalton native, achieved literary success by creating colorful characters based on the mountaineers of north Georgia.

Courtesy of James Murphy

Maybelle Harben

Maybelle Harben

Maybelle Chandler Harben, a socialite from South Carolina, married the Georgia novelist Will Harben in 1896.

Courtesy of James Murphy

Home of Will Harben

Home of Will Harben

The ancestral home of the Georgia novelist Will Harben is located at 306 Selvidge Street in Dalton.

Courtesy of James Murphy

Will Harben

Will Harben

Although novelist Will Harben spent most of his adult life in New York City, he always returned for a visit each summer to his native Dalton. Harben is quoted as saying, "I may live in the North, but my heart is in Dixie."

Courtesy of James Murphy

Augustus Baldwin Longstreet

Augustus Baldwin Longstreet

Augustus Baldwin Longstreet was the dean of the Georgia humorists. His book of humorous sketches, Georgia Scenes (1835), paved the way for other satirists, collectively known as the Georgia humorists.

Ruffian from Georgia Scenes

Ruffian from Georgia Scenes

This illustration from the 1840 edition of Augustus Baldwin Longstreet's Georgia Scenes depicts a young man practicing his technique for eye-gouging.

From Georgia Scenes, by Augustus Baldwin Longstreet

Evelina from Georgia Scenes

Evelina from Georgia Scenes

Augustus Baldwin Longstreet's vain and selfish character Evelina, illustrated here in the 1840 edition of Georgia Scenes, drives her husband to drink and dishonor in the literary sketch "The Charming Creature."

From Georgia Scenes, by Augustus Baldwin Longstreet

The Chattahoochee Review Covers

The Chattahoochee Review Covers

Each year The Chattahoochee Review publishes a special-focus issue. Past themes include "The South," "Ireland," "The Animal," and "Skin."

Courtesy of The Chattahoochee Review

The Chattahoochee Review

The Chattahoochee Review

The Chattahoochee Review, founded in 1981 at Georgia Perimeter College (later Georgia State University's Perimeter College), publishes both established and emerging writers, with an emphasis on writers from Georgia.

Courtesy of The Chattahoochee Review

The Chattahoochee Review

The Chattahoochee Review

The theme "Ireland" was the special focus of The Chattahoochee Review 's fall/winter issue in 2012. The artistic mission of the journal, published by Georgia State University's Perimeter College, is "Exporting the South. Importing the World."

Courtesy of The Chattahoochee Review

Byron Herbert Reece

Byron Herbert Reece

Renowned poet Byron Herbert Reece, a native of Dahlonega, attended Young Harris College, although he never completed a degree. Reece returned to the school as an instructor in the 1950s.

Townsend Prize

Townsend Prize

The Townsend Prize is awarded every other year to a Georgia writer for an outstanding work of fiction. The prize consists of a cash award and a commemorative silver tray.

Courtesy of Georgia Center for the Book

Georgia Center for the Book

Georgia Center for the Book

The Georgia Center for the Book, based at the DeKalb Public Library in Decatur, is the state affiliate for the Center of the Book at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

Courtesy of Georgia Center for the Book

A Childhood: The Biography of a Place

A Childhood: The Biography of a Place

Harry Crews's memoir of his childhood in rural Georgia, published in 1978, was lauded by critics as an honest depiction of the violence, desperation, and courage evoked by situtations of extreme poverty.

Harry Crews

Harry Crews

Writers Harry Crews and Paul Hemphill at Manuel's Tavern in Atlanta, 1979. Crews, author of the acclaimed memoir A Childhood: The Biography of a Place and numerous novels, wrote primarily about the poor white South. Often compared to such noted Georgia writers as Flannery O'Connor and James Dickey, Crews himself has been an important influence on many younger southern writers.

Courtesy of Special Collections & Archives, Georgia State University Library, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive.

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Wyatt Prunty

Wyatt Prunty

Wyatt Prunty, pictured here in March 2000, is a poet associated with the New Formalism movement. Prunty is Ogden D. Carlton Professor of English and director of the Sewanee Writers' Conference at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee.

Unarmed and Dangerous

Unarmed and Dangerous

A collection of Walter Prunty's poetry, entitled Unarmed and Dangerous, was published in 2000 by Johns Hopkins University Press.

James Alan McPherson

James Alan McPherson

James Alan McPherson attends a University of Iowa Writer’s Workshop class in 2005. McPherson, a Savannah native, was the first African American to win the Pulitzer Prize, awarded for his short story collection Elbow Room.

Photograph by Kirk Murray

Georgia Chain Gang

Georgia Chain Gang

Convicts work in unison on a Georgia chain gang in the early 1930s. John Spivak's original caption notes that "rhythmic movement is necessary to avoid injuring one another while bending or rising."

From Georgia Nigger, by J. L. Spivak

Whipping Report

Whipping Report

John Spivak was granted access to offical whipping reports, such as this one from Clarke County, while conducting research for his 1932 novel.

From Georgia Nigger, by J. L. Spivak

The Georgia Rack

The Georgia Rack

The stretching of arms on the "Georgia Rack" was among the many cruel punishments inflicted on Black prisoners and documented by John Spivak in the 1930s.

From Georgia Nigger, by J. L. Spivak

Prisoner in Georgia

Prisoner in Georgia

This sobering photograph was used as the frontispiece for John Spivak's 1932 novel, Georgia Nigger. By including such documentary photographs in his novel, Spivak hoped to alert the American public to the brutal conditions on Georgia's chain gangs.

From Georgia Nigger, by J. L. Spivak

Don West

Don West

An educator, activist, preacher, and poet, Don West worked throughout his life for social justice and the preservation of mountain culture. In 1964 West and his wife helped to open the Appalachian South Folklife Center at Pipestem, West Virginia, where West worked until his death in 1992. This photograph was taken at Pipestem circa 1986.

Courtesy of Yvonne Snyder Farley

Don West

Don West

Don West's lifelong political activism began during his college years. Expelled twice as an undergraduate for leading campus protests, West went on to attend the Divinty School at Vanderbilt University, where he became a socialist and labor organizer.

John Oliver Killens

John Oliver Killens

This portrait of John Oliver Killens, writer and founder of the Harlem Writers Guild, was photographed by Carl Van Vechten on June 8, 1954.

Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Carl Van Vechten Photograph Collection.

Christ Church

Christ Church

Christ Church, on St. Simons Island, was rebuilt in 1884 by a young minister, Anson Dodge, in memory of his deceased wife.

Image from septicbreath

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Eugenia Price

Eugenia Price

The fiction writer Eugenia Price is pictured with James Gould III outside St. Simons Lighthouse.

Stained Glass, Christ Church

Stained Glass, Christ Church