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Southern Regional Technical College

Southern Regional Technical College

The administrative campus for Southern Regional Technical College, formed in 2015 by the merger of Moultrie Technical College with Southwest Georgia Technical College, is located in Thomasville. The Thomasville campus of Southwest Georgia Tech was established in 1947 for the education of World War II veterans.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Moultrie Technical College

Moultrie Technical College

The main campus of Moultrie Technical College was located in Moultrie, the seat of Colquitt County. Established in 1964, the school catered to the agricultural industry of its service area, which encompassed Colquitt, Tift, Turner, and Worth counties. In 2015 it merged with Southwest Georgia Technical College to form Southern Regional Technical College.

Image from Michael Rivera

Thrash Hall

Thrash Hall

Thrash Hall, on the campus of South Georgia College in Coffee County, is named for the first president of the college and originally housed the school's library. Today the building, pictured circa 2002, serves as the president's office. Founded in 1907, South Georgia College is a four-year institution of the University System of Georgia.

Courtesy of South Georgia College

North Georgia College and State University

North Georgia College and State University

The Blue Ridge Mountains surround the campus of North Georgia College and State University, one of six senior military colleges in the United States.

Courtesy of NGCSU Relations

Middle Georgia College

Middle Georgia College

Courtesy of Tommy Thompson

Rains Hall

Rains Hall

Rains Hall houses the offices of the university president, advancement, and public relations and publications at Augusta State University. The building is named in honor of Colonel George W. Rains, who reopened the Academy of Richmond County after its closure during the Civil War.

Courtesy of Augusta State University

Haygood Hall

Haygood Hall

Haygood Hall (left) and Holsey Hall are pictured in 1899 on the campus of Paine College, a historically Black liberal arts college in Augusta.

Courtesy of Paine College

Lucius Holsey

Lucius Holsey

As bishop of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, Lucius Holsey oversaw the growth of the denomination in his native state of Georgia. He was also instrumental in the establishment of Paine Institute (later Paine College), which opened in Augusta in 1884.

Photograph by Mathew B. Brady. Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration

1891 Paine Institute Class

1891 Paine Institute Class

The 1891 class of the Paine College normal school, which trained preachers and teachers, is pictured. The college was founded in Augusta in 1884 to provide a liberal arts education to African American students of both genders.

Courtesy of Paine College

Paine College Faculty, 1936

Paine College Faculty, 1936

The faculty of Paine College, a historically Black college in Augusta, is pictured in 1936. The faculty was all white upon the college's opening in 1884 and was integrated four years later, when its first Black faculty member, John Wesley Gilbert, was hired.

Courtesy of Paine College

Paine College Basketball Team

Paine College Basketball Team

The Paine College men's basketball team is pictured in 1930. Sitting, left to right: A. Moore, C. Mack, Fair, McFall, Mills. Standing, left to right: Beckham, W. Moore, Snyder, Wallace, Bowman, and Wiggins (coach).

Courtesy of Paine College

Haygood-Holsey Hall

Haygood-Holsey Hall

Haygood-Holsey Hall, pictured in 2010, serves as the administration building for Paine College, a historically Black college in Augusta. The building was constructed in 1978 to replace Haygood Hall, which burned in 1968.

Courtesy of Paine College

Lucius H. Pitts

Lucius H. Pitts

Dr. Lucius Holsey Pitts, a member of the Paine College class of 1941, is pictured in 1971, when he became the college's first Black president.

Courtesy of Paine College

Mary Helm Hall

Mary Helm Hall

Mary Helm Hall, pictured in 2011, is a residence hall at Paine College, a historically Black college in Augusta. The hall was built in 1926 and renovated in 2008.

Courtesy of Paine College

GGC Building B

GGC Building B

Building B, pictured in 2012, is the main administrative and classroom building at Georgia Gwinnett College in Lawrenceville. It was designed by prominent Atlanta architect John Portman.

Photograph by and reprinted by permission of Michael Gagnon

GGC Library

GGC Library

The library at Georgia Gwinnett College, pictured in 2012, was completed in fall 2010. The school was the first four-year public college of the twenty-first century to be created in the United States.

Photograph by and reprinted by permission of Michael Gagnon

GGC Student Center

GGC Student Center

The student center at Georgia Gwinnett College in Lawrenceville, pictured in 2012, was completed in 2010. Georgia Gwinnett, a four-year institution of the University System of Georgia, was created in 2005 and opened with 118 students in 2006.

Photograph by and reprinted by permission of Michael Gagnon

GGC Library Interior

GGC Library Interior

Students gather in the library at Georgia Gwinnett College in Lawrenceville near the end of the 2012 spring semester. Enrollment at the college reached almost 8,000 at the beginning of the 2011-12 school year.

Photograph by and reprinted by permission of Michael Gagnon

GGC Dormitories

GGC Dormitories

Student dormitories, pictured in 2012, opened to students at Georgia Gwinnett College in 2010. Classes began at Georgia Gwinnett, a four-year college in Lawrenceville, in fall 2006.

Photograph by and reprinted by permission of Michael Gagnon

Oconee Fall Line Technical College

Oconee Fall Line Technical College

The administrative campus for Oconee Fall Line Technical College, known as the North Campus, is located in Sandersville. The college was formed in 2011 as a merger of Sandersville Technical College andHeart of Georgia Technical College.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

South Campus, Oconee Fall Line Technical College

South Campus, Oconee Fall Line Technical College

The South Campus of Oconee Fall Line Technical College is located in Dublin, the seat of Laurens County. The college was formed in 2011 as a merger of Heart of Georgia Technical College and Sandersville Technical College.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Flint River Campus

Flint River Campus

The Flint River campus of Southern Crescent Technical College is located in Thomaston, the seat of Upson County. The campus opened in 1961 as the Upson County Area Vocational-Technical School.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Southern Crescent Technical College

Southern Crescent Technical College

The administrative campus for Southern Crescent Technical College is located in Griffin. The college was formed in 2010 as a merger of Griffin Technical College and Flint River Technical College.

Photograph by Michael Rivera

Wiregrass Georgia Technical College

Wiregrass Georgia Technical College

The administrative campus for Wiregrass Georgia Technical College is located in Valdosta. The college was formed in 2010 as a merger of Valdosta Technical College and East Central Technical College.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Ben Hill–Irwin Campus

Ben Hill–Irwin Campus

The Ben Hill–Irwin campus of Wiregrass Georgia Technical College is located in Fitzgerald, the seat of Ben Hill County. The campus opened in 1970 as the Ben Hill–Irwin Area Vocational Institute.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Medical Department Staff

Medical Department Staff

Members of the operating room staff at the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University) in Augusta are pictured in the early 1900s.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
ric034.

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Georgia Health Sciences University

Georgia Health Sciences University

The original building on the campus of Georgia Health Sciences University, completed in Augusta in 1837, was designed by the architect Charles B. Cluskey. The structure, Cluskey's first major building, is an excellent example of the Greek revival style.

Courtesy of Georgia Health Sciences University

GHSU’s Children’s Medical Center

GHSU’s Children’s Medical Center

Children's Medical Center, a facility of Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta, opened in 1998 and focuses on pediatric and adolescent health care.

Courtesy of Ted Eytan, M.D.

Milton M. Antony

Milton M. Antony

Milton M. Antony, a physician in Augusta, was instrumental in the 1828 founding of the Medical Academy of Georgia, which later became Georgia Health Sciences University.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Augusta City Hospital

Augusta City Hospital

The city hospital in Augusta, built in 1818, served as the first home for Georgia Health Sciences University, from 1828 until the mid-1830s.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Medical Department’s Graduating Class, 1881

Medical Department’s Graduating Class, 1881

Pictured is the 1881 graduating class of the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University). Although women began attending classes at the college in 1875, they were not permitted to enroll as medical students until the 1920s.

Courtesy of Hall County Library System, Georgia Historical Photograph Collection.

New City Hospital

New City Hospital

A new city hospital in Augusta, which opened in 1869 and served for many years as the clinical training site for students at the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University), is pictured in 1894, following a renovation.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

University Hospital

University Hospital

University Hospital, completed in Augusta in 1915, was built for the Medical Department of UGA (later Georgia Health Sciences University) with the city's backing.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Newton Building

Newton Building

The Newton Building, on the campus of the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University) in Augusta, was occupied by the college from 1913 until 1956. The structure was demolished in 1960.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Expanded University Hospital

Expanded University Hospital

University Hospital, part of Georgia Health Sciences University in Augusta, was expanded in the mid-1930s as part of an effort to restore the good rating of the college and its membership in the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

G. Lombard Kelly

G. Lombard Kelly

G. Lombard Kelly served as dean of the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University) from 1934 until 1950, and as the college's first president from 1950 to 1953.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Eugene Talmadge Memorial Hospital

Eugene Talmadge Memorial Hospital

The Eugene Talmadge Memorial Hospital in Augusta, built by the state for the Medical College of Georgia (later Georgia Health Sciences University), opened in June 1956 with six buildings.

Courtesy of Historical Collections and Archives, Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library, Georgia Health Sciences University

Georgia Northwestern Technical College

Georgia Northwestern Technical College

The administrative campus of Georgia Northwestern Technical College is located in Rome, in Floyd County. The college's service delivery area includes Catoosa, Chattooga, Dade, Floyd, Gordon, Polk, and Walker counties.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Walker County Campus

Walker County Campus

The Walker County campus of Georgia Northwestern Technical College, formerly known as Northwestern Technical College, is located in Rock Spring. The campus opened in 1966 as the Walker County Area Vocational-Technical School.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Forbes Hall

Forbes Hall

Forbes Hall, on the campus of Thomas University in Thomasville, houses the president's office, as well as the administration and athletic offices. The building originally served as the main house of Birdwood Plantation, which was built in 1932 as a winter resort for W. Cameron Forbes, a U.S. ambassador to Japan.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Cameron Forbes

Cameron Forbes

W. Cameron Forbes, a U.S. ambassador to Japan and one-time governor of the Philippines, established Birdwood Plantation in Thomas County in 1932. During the 1950s his plantation was converted into Birdwood College, which later became Thomas University.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Birdwood College Students

Birdwood College Students

Students attend class at Birdwood College, which later became Thomas University, in Thomasville during the 1960s. Enrollment at Birdwood College declined during this decade due to its lack of accreditation and limited academic offerings.

Courtesy of Thomas University

J. Harley Chapman

J. Harley Chapman

J. Harley Chapman founded Birdwood College, a school originally affiliated with the Primitive Baptist denomination, in Thomasville in 1950, and classes began four years later. Known today as Thomas University, the school is a nonsectarian, private, and independent institution offering associate's, bachelor's, and master's degrees.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Birdwood College Graduates

Birdwood College Graduates

Graduates of Birdwood College are pictured in the 1960s. The college, founded in Thomasville by Primitive Baptists, opened in 1954 and operated until 1977, when the school became a nonsectarian institution called Thomas County Community College. By 2000 the college had evolved into Thomas University.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Birdwood Annex

Birdwood Annex

The Birdwood Annex (left) is attached to Forbes Hall, the administration building on the campus of Thomas University in Thomasville. The annex houses faculty offices, as well as the office for institutional advancement.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Thomas University Students

Thomas University Students

Students at Thomas University in Thomasville are pictured circa 2008. The university's student body comes primarily from south Georgia and north Florida to pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees at the private institution.

Courtesy of Thomas University

Carroll Technical Institute

Carroll Technical Institute

Carroll Technical Institute opened in Carrollton in 1968 and retained that name until 2000, when it became West Central Technical College. In 2009 the college merged with West Georgia Technical College.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

LaGrange Campus

LaGrange Campus

The LaGrange campus of West Georgia Technical College is located in LaGrange, the seat of Troup County. The campus opened in 1966 as the Troup County Area Vocational-Technical School.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Video Students

Video Students

Video production, a popular program at West Georgia Technical College, is offered through the school's Digital Media Program and Video Services Department. Students at West Georgia Tech produce television programs and have made award-winning documentaries.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Columbus Technical College

Columbus Technical College

Columbus Technical College serves Chattahoochee, Harris, Muscogee, Quitman, and Stewart counties. The school's most popular programs are in health sciences, including nursing, pharmacy technology, and dental assisting.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Appalachian Campus

Appalachian Campus

The Appalachian campus of Chattahoochee Technical College, formerly known as Appalachian Technical College, is located in Jasper. The campus opened in 1967 as the Pickens Area Vocational-Technical School.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Chattahoochee Technical College

Chattahoochee Technical College

The administrative campus of Chattahoochee Technical College, the largest college in the Technical College System of Georgia, is located in Marietta, in Cobb County. The college's service delivery area covers Bartow, Cherokee, Cobb, Gilmer, Paulding, and Pickens counties.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

North Metro Campus

North Metro Campus

The North Metro campus of Chattahoochee Technical College, formerly known as North Metro Technical College, is located in Bartow County. The campus opened in 1985 to serve northwest Atlanta.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Central Georgia Technical College

Central Georgia Technical College

The Warner Robins campus, pictured circa 2007, serves as the administrative campus of Central Georgia Technical College, following the merger between Central Georgia Tech and Middle Georgia Technical College in 2013.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Central Georgia Technical College

Central Georgia Technical College

The Macon campus of Central Georgia Technical College is pictured circa 2007. In 2013 Central Georgia Tech merged with Middle Georgia Technical College to create an institution with a service delivery area of eleven counties.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Augusta Technical College

Augusta Technical College

The only technical school in Georgia to win the U.S. Secretary of Education's Award of Excellence, Augusta Technical College is especially strong in the areas of computer systems networking and emergency medical technology.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College was chartered in 1879 and built in Milledgeville, a former state capital, on property formerly used to house state government. Today its students are current and future members of the U.S. military.

Courtesy of Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College Drill Team

Georgia Military College Drill Team

Members of the prize-winning Georgia Military College drill team are pictured in 1887 outside the Old Capitol Building, on the school's campus in Milledgeville.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal036.

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Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College

The Old Capitol Building in Milledgeville can be seen through the Georgia Military College gateway, circa 1940. The Gothic Revival building became the main facility for the college in 1880. In 1941 the building was severely damaged by fire and later rebuilt.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal060.

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Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College

Students at Georgia Military College in Milledgeville participate in a chemistry laboratory class. Chartered in 1879, the college developed a close relationship with the U.S. military during the 1930s and was designated a military junior college in 1950.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bal159.

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Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College

In 2005 the New Academic Building opened at Georgia Military College in Milledgeville. The structure features two identical wings joined by a central hall.

Courtesy of Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College

Georgia Military College

Students line up outside Georgia Military College in Milledgeville, circa 1915.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #bal178-83.

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Swainsboro Campus

Swainsboro Campus

The Swainsboro campus of Southeastern Technical College, formerly known as Swainsboro Technical College, is located in Swainsboro, the seat of Emanuel County. The campus opened in 1963 to provide technical and vocational education to twenty Georgia counties.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Southeastern Technical College

Southeastern Technical College

The administrative campus of Southeastern Technical College is located in Vidalia, in Toombs County. The college's service delivery area covers Candler, Emanuel, Jenkins, Johnson, Montgomery, Tattnall, Toombs, and Treutlen counties.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

South Georgia Technical College

South Georgia Technical College

South Georgia Technical College, established in Americus in 1948, serves a six-county delivery area, including Crisp, Macon, Marion, Schley, Sumter, and Webster counties. It is the only technical school in the state to offer on-campus housing and intercollegiate athletics.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Savannah Technical College

Savannah Technical College

Savannah Technical College, established as the Opportunity School in 1929, serves Bryan, Chatham, Effingham, and Liberty counties. In addition to its main campus in Savannah, the school operates facilities in Hinesville and at Fort Stewart.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Okefenokee Technical College

Okefenokee Technical College

The main campus of Okefenokee Technical College is located in Waycross, the seat of Ware County. The school also operates a satellite campus in Bacon County. As of 2005 the college's most popular program was industrial mechanics and maintenance technology.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Ogeechee Technical College

Ogeechee Technical College

The main campus of Ogeechee Technical College, which serves Bulloch, Evans, and Screven counties, is located in Statesboro. The school's most popular program in 2005 was nursing, and its funeral-service education program was the first of its kind in the state.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

North Georgia Technical College

North Georgia Technical College

The main campus of North Georgia Technical College, the first vocational school in the state, is located in Clarkesville, the seat of Habersham County. The college also operates satellite campuses in Union County and Stephens County, as well as eight learning centers.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Lanier Technical College

Lanier Technical College

Lanier Technical College, located in Hall County, serves Banks, Barrow, Dawson, Forsyth, Hall, Jackson, Lumpkin, and north Fulton counties. Established in 1966, the school offers programs and workforce training geared toward the health care and poultry industries of the surrounding area.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Gwinnett Technical College

Gwinnett Technical College

Gwinnett Technical College, established in 1984 as a magnet school for health and business education, is the largest provider of corporate training in Gwinnett County. The school's main campus is located in Lawrenceville, the seat of Gwinnett County.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Athens Technical College

Athens Technical College

Students at Athens Technical College participate in the school's Administrative Office Technology course. Athens Tech offers degree, diploma, and technical certificate of credit programs, and served more than 6,000 students in 2005.

Courtesy of Athens Technical College

Georgia Piedmont Technical College

Georgia Piedmont Technical College

The main campus of Georgia Piedmont Technical College, formerly known as DeKalb Tech, is located in Clarkston. The school, which serves DeKalb, Morgan, Newton, and Rockdale counties, offers one of the largest adult literacy and ESL programs in the state.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Atlanta Technical College

Atlanta Technical College

Atlanta Technical College, located in Fulton County, is committed to preparing students for the local workforce. The school offers aviation and automotive programs, in partnership with Delta Air Lines and BMW, and its nursing program supports the employment needs of Emory Healthcare and the WellStar Health System.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Yancey Partnership

Yancey Partnership

Students at Altamaha Technical College in Wayne County participate in the school's heavy-equipment service-technician program. The program, established in 2005, is a partnership between Altamaha Tech and Yancey Bros. Company, the oldest Caterpillar dealer in the country.

Courtesy of Altamaha Technical College

Altamaha Technical College

Altamaha Technical College

Altamaha Technical College, serving Appling, Jeff Davis, Long, and Wayne counties, is located in Jesup, the seat of Wayne County. Operating since 1989, the school offers associate degree, diploma, and certificate programs, as well as noncredit and adult literacy courses.

Courtesy of Altamaha Technical College

Albany Technical College

Albany Technical College

Albany Technical College, located in Albany, serves Baker, Calhoun, Dougherty, Lee, Randolph, and Terrell counties. The school focuses particularly on training students for employment in manufacturing, health care, and hospitality services, and its Adult Computer Testing Center offers a variety of on-demand courses.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Athens Technical College

Athens Technical College

Athens Tech was created in 1958. Today, the college's curriculum is especially strong in the health services fields.

Courtesy of Athens Technical College

Technical College System of Georgia

Technical College System of Georgia

The headquarters of the Technical College System of Georgia (TCSG) are located in Atlanta at Century Place.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Veterinary Technician Program

Veterinary Technician Program

An instructor and student at Heart of Georgia Technical College (later Oconee Fall Line Technical College) in Dublin examine a dog skeleton as part of course work in the school's veterinary technician program.

Courtesy of Technical College System of Georgia

Jack Tarver Library

Jack Tarver Library

The Jack Tarver Library, located on the Mercer University campus in Macon, is named for Jackson Williams Tarver, a prominent Georgia journalist and businessman. Tarver graduated from Mercer University in 1938, with a degree in journalism.

Courtesy of Mercer University

Penfield Baptist Church

Penfield Baptist Church

Penfield Baptist Church, pictured in the 1940s, was built in 1845 as the chapel for Mercer University in Penfield. The university gave the chapel to Penfield Baptist Church in 1871, when the campus moved to Macon.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
grn009.

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Penfield Campus

Penfield Campus

The remains of the academy building, which burned in 1977, stand on the fomer campus of Mercer Institute (later Mercer University) in Penfield. The school, founded in 1833, moved to Macon in 1871.

Courtesy of Forrest Shropshire

Mercer University

Mercer University

the Knight Hall of Mercer University in Macon, Georgia. In 1912, when the citizens of Macon pledged support to the university, school administrators decided against moving the campus to Atlanta.

Image from Brandon Dolley

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Mercer University Students

Mercer University Students

Members of the Baptist association at Mercer University gather on the school's former grounds in Penfield, circa 1949. The college was founded in Penfield in 1833 with a gift from the Georgia Baptist Convention. In 1871 the campus moved to Macon, where it remains today.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
grn008.

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Mercer University Center

Mercer University Center

The University Center at Mercer University in Macon offers a fitness center, a swimming pool, and an arena for sporting events and concerts. The center also includes a bookstore and dining facilities.

Courtesy of Mercer University

Sea Camp

Sea Camp

Partcipants in the Sea Camp program at the University of Georgia Marine Education Center and Aquarium prepare to go crabbing. The marine center, located on Skidaway Island, works closely with the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography to educate the public about marine ecosystems.

Courtesy of University of Georgia Photographic Services

Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

The Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, located on Skidaway Island near Savannah, is an autonomous research unit within the University System of Georgia. The institute's 700-acre campus contains facilities for both saltwater and freshwater ecological research and supports approximately fourteen faculty and seventy staff members.

Image from Michael Rivera

Blue Fin

Blue Fin

The research vessel Blue Fin is operated by Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, located on Skidaway Island in Savannah.

Courtesy of Ed Deering

J. S. Green Collegiate Institute

J. S. Green Collegiate Institute

The J. S. Green Collegiate Institute, founded by the Reverend Charles C. Spence, opened in Demorest in 1897 and offered classes ranging in level from the first grade to college. In 1901 the school was adopted by the American Missionary Association, and its name was changed to Piedmont College.

Courtesy of Piedmont College

Charles C. Spence

Charles C. Spence

The Reverend Charles C. Spence was the founding president of Piedmont College. Before Piedmont was adopted by the American Missionary Association in 1901, Spence cashed in his own life insurance policy to support the college.

Courtesy of Piedmont College

James E. Walter

James E. Walter

James E. Walter was president of Piedmont College for thirty-four years, from 1949 until his retirement in 1983. During his tenure, Walter oversaw the construction of nine new buildings on campus and improved the school's financial standing by eliminating debt and establishing an endowment.

Courtesy of Piedmont College

Arrendale Library

Arrendale Library

Piedmont College's Arrendale Library opened in 1991. Its holdings include an online catalog of more than 120,000 volumes.

Courtesy of Piedmont College

Loudermilk Field

Loudermilk Field

The Loudermilk Baseball Complex at Piedmont College in Demorest was completed in 2005. The school's teams, which include baseball, basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, and volleyball, compete in the NCAA Division III.

Courtesy of Piedmont College

Albany State University Graduates, 1938

Albany State University Graduates, 1938

Members of the Georgia Normal and Agricultural College graduating class of 1938 pose with family and friends. The college later became Albany State University.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # dgh137.

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Joseph Winthrop Holley

Joseph Winthrop Holley

Joseph Winthrop Holley, pictured circa 1903, founded the Albany Bible and Manual Training Institute in Albany in 1903. He was inspired to open the school by the writings of W. E. B. Du Bois, which describe the poor educational opportunities for Black southerners at that time.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #dgh127.

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College Band

College Band

The band for the Georgia Normal and Agricultural College (later Albany State University) plays on Broad Street in downtown Albany, circa 1925. In 1932 the school became part of the University System of Georgia.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # dgh155.

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Johnson and King

Johnson and King

Civil rights activist and real estate broker Slater King was one of the leaders of the Albany Movement. To the left is Bernice Johnson, one of the original Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Freedom Singers, who later formed the musical group Sweet Honey in the Rock.

Courtesy of Cochran Studios/A. E. Jenkins Photography

Joseph Winthrop Holley and Mary McLeod Bethune

Joseph Winthrop Holley and Mary McLeod Bethune

Joseph Winthrop Holley, the founder of the Albany Bible and Manual Training Institute (later Albany State University) in Albany, is pictured in 1952 with Mary McLeod Bethune, the founder of the Daytona Normal and Industrial Institute for Negro Girls in Florida.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, # dgh141.

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Rollins Planetarium

Rollins Planetarium

The Rollins Planetarium at Young Harris College opened in 1979 and is one of the largest in the state.

Courtesy of Kent Montgomery

Young L. G. Harris

Young L. G. Harris

Young L. G. Harris, a judge from Athens, was an early benefactor of Young Harris College, which was named in his honor by Artemus Lester, the school's founder.

Courtesy of Young Harris College

Sharp Hall

Sharp Hall

Sharp Hall, on the campus of Young Harris College in Towns County, was rebuilt by the residents of Young Harris following a fire in 1911. The building is named for the Reverend Joseph A. Sharp, who served as president of the school from 1899 to 1916, and again from 1922 to 1930.

Courtesy of Young Harris College

Byron Herbert Reece

Byron Herbert Reece

Renowned poet Byron Herbert Reece, a native of Dahlonega, attended Young Harris College, although he never completed a degree. Reece returned to the school as an instructor in the 1950s.

Young Harris Students

Young Harris Students

Students participate in an art class at Young Harris College, in Towns County. The two-year liberal arts school offers a variety of fine arts and music classes, made possible through an endowment of approximately $100 million.

Courtesy of Young Harris College

Waycross College

Waycross College

Waycross College, a two-year institution of the University System of Georgia, was founded in Waycross in 1970. The administration building, pictured, is part of the school's 155-acre campus, which opened for classes in 1976.

Courtesy of Waycross College

Wesleyan Students

Wesleyan Students

Students at Wesleyan Female College, later Wesleyan College, in Macon study astronomy in 1905. The college was not only the first institution of higher education to grant degrees to women, but was also notable for its emphasis on mathematics and science courses.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bib037.

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Wesleyan College

Wesleyan College

Wesleyan College, located in Macon, was chartered in 1836 as the first degree-granting women's college in the world. Today approximately 700 students are enrolled at the four-year liberal arts school.

Photograph by Farrargirl

Wesleyan Female College

Wesleyan Female College

Georgia Female College, founded in Macon by the Methodist Church in 1836, became Wesleyan Female College in 1843. The name change honored Methodism's founder, John Wesley. In 1917 the school's current name, Wesleyan College, was adopted.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bib011.

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Adelphean Room

Adelphean Room

The Adelphean Room, located in the Alpha Delta Pi sorority house at Wesleyan College in Macon, is named in honor of the Adelphean Society, which was founded at the school in 1851. Later renamed Alpha Delta Pi, the society is considered to be the mother of the modern sorority system.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bib136.

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Wesleyan College

Wesleyan College

Wesleyan College moved from downtown Macon to its current location in the suburb of Rivoli in 1928. The original master architecture and landscape plan has been maintained since that time, and the campus was named a National Register Historic District in 2004.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
bib133.

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Wesleyan Students

Wesleyan Students

Wesleyan College, a four-year liberal arts college for women, is ranked among the nation's top liberal arts colleges for diversity. Located in Macon, the school offers twenty-nine undergraduate majors, as well as eight preprofessional programs and two master's degrees.

Courtesy of Wesleyan College

Peterson Hall

Peterson Hall

Students gather in front of Peterson Hall on the campus of the Eleventh District Agricultural and Mechanical School (later South Georgia College), circa 1920.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
cof052.

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Founders Hall

Founders Hall

Founders Hall houses the Department of Fine Arts and Humanities at Fort Valley State University in Peach County. Fort Valley State is one of three public historically Black colleges and universities in the state.

Courtesy of Communications Department, College of Agriculture, Home Economics and Allied Programs, Fort Valley State University

Fort Valley State University

Fort Valley State University

Students in the College of Agriculture, Home Economics, and Allied Programs at Fort Valley State University attend class. Fort Valley was founded in Peach County as an industrial high school in 1895 and attained university status in 1996.

Courtesy of Communications Department, College of Agriculture, Home Economics and Allied Programs, Fort Valley State University

Cooperative Extension Service

Cooperative Extension Service

Stinson Troutman (left), an agent with the Cooperative Extension program at Fort Valley State University in Peach County, assists farmers in the surrounding community with making their operations more profitable.

Courtesy of Fort Valley State University Cooperative Extension Program

Veterinary Science

Veterinary Science

Veterinary students at Fort Valley State University in Peach County gather for an anatomy lecture by Frank Lochner, a professor in the Department of Veterinary Science. The department was established in 1976.

Courtesy of Communications Department, College of Agriculture, Home Economics and Allied Programs, Fort Valley State University

King Chapel

King Chapel

The Martin Luther King Jr. International Chapel was built on the Morehouse University campus to honor one of the school's most prestigious alumni. The chapel's mission is to continue King's work by welcoming adherents of all faiths who "embody the vision of peace."

Courtesy of Morehouse College

John Hope

John Hope

John Hope, the first Black president of both Morehouse College and Atlanta University (later Clark Atlanta University), was an important African American educator and race leader of the early twentieth century.

Image from The Crisis, Vol 8, No 1, May 1914

Benjamin Mays

Benjamin Mays

After a period of decline during the 1930s, Morehouse College emerged as a thriving institution under the guidance of Benjamin Mays, who served as the school's president from 1940 until 1967. During his tenure, Mays encouraged both faculty and students, including the young Martin Luther King Jr., to become involved in the civil rights movement.

Courtesy of Morehouse College

Morehouse College Graduates

Morehouse College Graduates

Graduates of Morehouse University in Atlanta, one of the most prestigious historically Black colleges in the nation, proceed through campus during a baccalaureate ceremony.

Courtesy of Morehouse College

Circus Parade, Madison

Circus Parade, Madison

A circus parades through the square in downtown Madison, circa 1912. This photograph is included in the Vanishing Georgia collection at the Georgia Archives in Morrow. The project was initiated by Carroll Hart, the former director of the archives, in 1975 to collect and preserve images documenting the state's past.

Courtesy of Georgia Archives, Vanishing Georgia, #
mor017-014.

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